• Question on spoken Italian: Is saying Commissa' for Commissario, Signo' for Signora, etc., purely Neapolitan, or what?

    In the excellent series of Commissario Ricciardi mysteries by Maurizio de Giovanni, set in Naples, various speakers (as translated and presumably in the original Italian) use the above and various other shortenings of titles and names (e.g., Bambine' for Bambinella). Is this a general thing in colloquial Italian, typical only of Naples and... show more
    In the excellent series of Commissario Ricciardi mysteries by Maurizio de Giovanni, set in Naples, various speakers (as translated and presumably in the original Italian) use the above and various other shortenings of titles and names (e.g., Bambine' for Bambinella). Is this a general thing in colloquial Italian, typical only of Naples and perhaps other regions, or what?
    2 answers · Languages · 1 year ago
  • Can anyone tell me why, in "View from the Bridge" on Broadway, Rodolfo (Russell Tovey) takes off his shirt toward the end of the play?

    I know why the producers would want the actor to strip--Tovey has developed an impressive body, as shown in photos--but what's the *character's* motivation? The video at the NewYorkCityTheatre site seems to show his brother Marco also gets shirtless w/ him.
    I know why the producers would want the actor to strip--Tovey has developed an impressive body, as shown in photos--but what's the *character's* motivation? The video at the NewYorkCityTheatre site seems to show his brother Marco also gets shirtless w/ him.
    1 answer · Comics & Animation · 2 years ago
  • Can anyone tell me why, in "View from the Bridge" on Broadway, Rodolfo (Russell Tovey) takes off his shirt toward the end of the play?

    I know why the producers would want the actor to strip--Tovey has developed an impressive body, as shown in phots--but what's the *character's* motivation? The video at the NewYorkCityTheatre site seems to show his brother Marco also gets shirtles w/ him.
    I know why the producers would want the actor to strip--Tovey has developed an impressive body, as shown in phots--but what's the *character's* motivation? The video at the NewYorkCityTheatre site seems to show his brother Marco also gets shirtles w/ him.
    2 answers · Comics & Animation · 2 years ago
  • Is it true that bi people, guys in particular, can go thru phases as tho they alternated str8 and gay?

    The above was stated in an answer here in Y!/A as tho it was a certainty. Is it established that this happens w/ bisexuals--even if it's only for a minority--switching back and forth from male to female preference? Or do they/you always feel attraction (not necessarily 50/50) to both genders? Sign me, Ignorant Gay Guy P.S. Ignorance is... show more
    The above was stated in an answer here in Y!/A as tho it was a certainty. Is it established that this happens w/ bisexuals--even if it's only for a minority--switching back and forth from male to female preference? Or do they/you always feel attraction (not necessarily 50/50) to both genders? Sign me, Ignorant Gay Guy P.S. Ignorance is curable! Help me find a cure.
    3 answers · Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgendered · 4 years ago
  • What's the point of including Q for "Questioning" in LGBTQIA?

    When LGBTQIA means Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transsexual, QUEER, Intersex, Asexual and/or Ally, it makes sense to me. But what possible use is including "questioning", as I see the acronym expanded in more than one place? (And Wikipedia notes 'Other variants may add a "U" for "unsure" [and/or] a "C" for... show more
    When LGBTQIA means Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transsexual, QUEER, Intersex, Asexual and/or Ally, it makes sense to me. But what possible use is including "questioning", as I see the acronym expanded in more than one place? (And Wikipedia notes 'Other variants may add a "U" for "unsure" [and/or] a "C" for "curious"', which come to the same thing.) So far as I can tell, society is not now, and hopefully never will be, in a thought-control situation where merely wondering what one is requires the kind of legal and social support that knowing what one is--and that our identity isn't the heterosexual norm!--requires. If this attitude is insensitive and/or ignorant, that why I'm posting, in order to be enlightened.
    2 answers · Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgendered · 4 years ago
  • What are "swing shorts"?

    I recently read a NYTimes article declaring that swing shorts are a new element of Dsquared2's current men's fashion show. My text Net searches find no explanation, and image searches turn up women's garments that, to me at least, just look like various women's shorts. My run thru a slideshow of the Dsquared2 presentation... show more
    I recently read a NYTimes article declaring that swing shorts are a new element of Dsquared2's current men's fashion show. My text Net searches find no explanation, and image searches turn up women's garments that, to me at least, just look like various women's shorts. My run thru a slideshow of the Dsquared2 presentation doesn't help. So I turn to y'all. Helpppp! Thx! Note: Article is "Dsquared sticks with the formula" at http://runway.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/06/...
    1 answer · Fashion & Accessories · 4 years ago
  • What's the right term for those leaves & curlicues printers can use to mark divisions inside a chapter?

    They aren't "printer's marks" (the term I thought I remembered) or "printer's devices". Both terms mean a more or less elaborate colophon at the ends of books. I'm talking about the pretty little things scattered through the text, sometimes only as large as 2 characters together, as a substitute for a blank... show more
    They aren't "printer's marks" (the term I thought I remembered) or "printer's devices". Both terms mean a more or less elaborate colophon at the ends of books. I'm talking about the pretty little things scattered through the text, sometimes only as large as 2 characters together, as a substitute for a blank line, or substituting for or supplementing a paragraph starting w/o an indent.
    2 answers · Books & Authors · 4 years ago
  • Why are some guys turned on by built shirtless guys, even tho they do NOT want to have sex w/ them?

    More than one guy has declared in Y!/A (usually in the LGBT section) that he gets turned on by looking at hot male bodies, in life and/or in pix--at least one even masturbates to climax--but the thought of actually having sex w/ another guy turns him off. My best guess, which I've expressed to them AS a guess, is that these guys are excited... show more
    More than one guy has declared in Y!/A (usually in the LGBT section) that he gets turned on by looking at hot male bodies, in life and/or in pix--at least one even masturbates to climax--but the thought of actually having sex w/ another guy turns him off. My best guess, which I've expressed to them AS a guess, is that these guys are excited by the idea of BEING a built guy showing off for the world. They identify w/ the sexy models rather than lusting after them. Others over in LGBT dismiss them as "bi or bi-curious". But given that these guys want to date only girls and have sex only with girls, I have to say they're str8, not bi. Since I haven't seen any better explanation than my own guess in LGBT, I'm now offering the problem in this section. Any insights, people?
    9 answers · Men's Health · 4 years ago
  • Italian question: What vowel is the apostrophe in Lorenzo de'Medici substituting for?

    I'm reading a historical novel, and have been struck by all the instances of "de" in surnames being spelled w/ an apostrophe, which is apparently standard usage in Italian. The online dictionaries and grammars inform me that an Italian apostrophe indicates a dropped final vowel. That is in fact what I expected, as in D'Egidio,... show more
    I'm reading a historical novel, and have been struck by all the instances of "de" in surnames being spelled w/ an apostrophe, which is apparently standard usage in Italian. The online dictionaries and grammars inform me that an Italian apostrophe indicates a dropped final vowel. That is in fact what I expected, as in D'Egidio, presumably elided from De+Egidio, or Dell'Amore, I suppose from Della+Amore, or Dell'Orso, from Dello+Orso (if I've got my genders right), eventually from Di+Lo+Orso. But I can't figure what's going on with de' before consonants! Looking up "de" gets me nowhere, except to make perfectly clear that the Italian equivalent of Spanish "de" (which I know more about) is "di", and that "de" is restricted to names. So, what's the history here?
    2 answers · Languages · 4 years ago
  • What ARE yoga pants? How do they differ from exercise pants in general?

    Until the news reports of Lululemon yoga pants being recalled (they were too thin over the buttocks and went see-thru when a woman bent), I had never heard of yoga pants. And now that I have, and I've done image searches on the Net, I don't see how "women's yoga pants" is a different category from "women's exercise... show more
    Until the news reports of Lululemon yoga pants being recalled (they were too thin over the buttocks and went see-thru when a woman bent), I had never heard of yoga pants. And now that I have, and I've done image searches on the Net, I don't see how "women's yoga pants" is a different category from "women's exercise pants"! Most of the hits show what I'd call tights--no surprise, given what the str8 guys like to look at--but those at http://yoga.about.com/od/yogagear/tp/yog... range from form-fitting to form-disguising, ankle length to calf length. Is that site misleading, and "yoga pants" is ordinarily just a synonym for "exercise tights"? If so, is this just trendiness in labeling, or what? If not, what exercise pants (other than shorts!) would you NOT call yoga pants?
    4 answers · Fashion & Accessories · 5 years ago
  • In Flint's 1632 series, what does Harry Lefferts look like?

    In the Papal Stakes installment, he's said to be striking and distinctive, but w/o a word of detail. And I can't remember what I've read earlier. So, HELP?!?
    In the Papal Stakes installment, he's said to be striking and distinctive, but w/o a word of detail. And I can't remember what I've read earlier. So, HELP?!?
    1 answer · Books & Authors · 5 years ago
  • Why have all the most interesting questions in Religion & Spirituality been deleted?

    And nevertheless show up on the list when sorted by fewest answers? Happens occasionally in LGBT, where I usually hang out, too. But it's an absolute plague here in R&S!
    And nevertheless show up on the list when sorted by fewest answers? Happens occasionally in LGBT, where I usually hang out, too. But it's an absolute plague here in R&S!
    3 answers · Religion & Spirituality · 5 years ago
  • I can see why an octogenarian w/ a persistent fever would be placed in the ICU. But why a liquid diet?

    I'm wondering, of course, about former US President George H.W. Bush, who had such a problem w/ a bronchitis-type illness. All I can find from a 'Net search is that his spokesman, when asked, didn't know why the diet was prescribed either. Of course we must avoid long-distance diagnosis, so: Why MIGHT a man LIKE the ex-President be... show more
    I'm wondering, of course, about former US President George H.W. Bush, who had such a problem w/ a bronchitis-type illness. All I can find from a 'Net search is that his spokesman, when asked, didn't know why the diet was prescribed either. Of course we must avoid long-distance diagnosis, so: Why MIGHT a man LIKE the ex-President be prescribed a liquid diet in SIMILAR circumstances?
    3 answers · Respiratory Diseases · 5 years ago
  • Does setting the weight back to zero each time prolong the life of a balance beam scale?

    I'm talking about a simple two-beam scale, the kind many health clubs (including mine) and more traditional doctor's offices use. Quite a while ago, I heard or read that it's good to set such scales back to zero rather than leave them displaying your weight. But I don't remember from whom or where, so I can't evaluate the... show more
    I'm talking about a simple two-beam scale, the kind many health clubs (including mine) and more traditional doctor's offices use. Quite a while ago, I heard or read that it's good to set such scales back to zero rather than leave them displaying your weight. But I don't remember from whom or where, so I can't evaluate the claim's likely reliability. I'm asking this in Engineering rather than where the Y!/A robot suggests because I hope someone here can figure out the answer, even if they don't already know it. (Better yet if somebody knows, I suppose!)
    4 answers · Engineering · 6 years ago
  • Can one use a diminutive w/ a patronymic in Russian?

    Specifically, is calling Mr. Putin "Vlad Vladimirovich" merely over-familiar, or too bizarre to use at all?
    Specifically, is calling Mr. Putin "Vlad Vladimirovich" merely over-familiar, or too bizarre to use at all?
    4 answers · Languages · 6 years ago
  • What explains the strange pawn design in the giant chess set of "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" movie?

    They are figures of men kneeling and bent over, each holding two swords, w/ shields on their backs. (The kings, queens, and bishops also have shields on their backs.) They're quite impressive in the movie when, as the kids approach the row of white pawns, they all rear up and cross their swords with a great noise. But although I've... show more
    They are figures of men kneeling and bent over, each holding two swords, w/ shields on their backs. (The kings, queens, and bishops also have shields on their backs.) They're quite impressive in the movie when, as the kids approach the row of white pawns, they all rear up and cross their swords with a great noise. But although I've seen quite a few chess sets over my life, including some from previous millennia, none have ever had pawns remotely like these! Have the designers ever discussed this choice? Because if so, my 'Net searches aren't finding anything about it!
    2 answers · Movies · 6 years ago
  • ¿Por qué necesitamos ambos “te” y “a tí” en este oración? (Question on translation from English.)?

    (Since this is basically a translation question, I trust I will be permitted to ask it essentially all in English, which I can write accurately. I am prepared to work through answers in Spanish. My master's is in linguistics.) In the paperback hymnal our parish uses, there is a macaronic (partly English, partly Spanish) hymn with each... show more
    (Since this is basically a translation question, I trust I will be permitted to ask it essentially all in English, which I can write accurately. I am prepared to work through answers in Spanish. My master's is in linguistics.) In the paperback hymnal our parish uses, there is a macaronic (partly English, partly Spanish) hymn with each language translated into the other at the bottom of the page. One line in the Spanish translation particularly caught my eye because it illustrates well the standard computer programmer’s complaint that everything is longer in any other language than it is in English. Cuando servimos a los pobres y a los humildes te encontramos a tí. is meant to translate We find you when we serve the poor and lowly. Why, when we need only one “you” in English, are both “te” and “a tí” needed in the Spanish? *Please* don’t tell me “because that’s grammatical” or “because it sounds right” (which is a way of saying that you know Spanish grammar but can't explain it) or even "because English doesn't have as much grammar"! I want to know what rule of Spanish grammar requires both. It wouldn’t hurt to also tell me whether the sentence would mean something different or simply be wrong if either were omitted. ¡Muchas gracias! In case anybody cares, the hymn is “Amén, El Cuerpo de Cristo” by John Schiavone.
    2 answers · Idiomas · 6 years ago