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carlo

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  • "Don't you like it?" "No." <- How would you understand it?

    If someone says "No" to a negative question, how would you interpret it?

    A) No, I don't like it.

    B) No, it's not like that.  I like it.

    Thank you in advance.

    2 AnswersWords & Wordplay3 months ago
  • "Don't you like it?" "No." <- How would you interpret it?

    If anyone simply says "No" to a negative question, how would you interpret it?

    A) No, I don't like it.

    B) Yes, I like it.

    Thank you in advance.

    2 AnswersLanguages3 months ago
  • any + plural and singular?

    I'm studying English.

    I don't understand how you decide whether you use a singular form or a plural form after "any".

    i.e.

    A1) I don't have any friend in the U.K.

    A2) I don't have any friends in the U.K.

    B1) Tom's taller than any other student in his class.

    B2) Tom's taller than any other students in his class.

    C1) Have you ever seen any Japanese film?

    C2) Have you ever seen any Japanese films?

    I don't understand when I should use a plural form and when a singular form. What makes the difference?

    Thank you in advance.

    2 AnswersLanguages3 months ago
  • The place of an adjective.  Difference in meaning? ?

    I'm studying English.

    A1) Venus is the closest planet to the Earth.

    A2) Venus is the planet closest to the Earth.

    They both mean the exactly same thing, don't they?

    How about the sentences below?

    B1) Tom is the closest friend to me.

    B2) Tom is the friend closest to me.

    I don't know if I understand correctly, but they sound different to me.  Please tell me what you think and why.  Thank you in advance.

    1 AnswerWords & Wordplay3 months ago
  • any + plural and singular?

    I'm studying English.

    I don't understand how you decide whether you use a singular form or a plural form after "any".

    i.e.

    A1) I don't have any friend in the U.K.

    A2) I don't have any friends in the U.K.

    B1) Tom's taller than any other student in his class.

    B2) Tom's taller than any other students in his class.

    C1) Have you ever seen any Japanese film?

    C2) Have you ever seen any Japanese films?

    I don't understand when I should use a plural form and when a singular form.   What makes the difference?

    Thank you in advance.

    Words & Wordplay3 months ago
  • The place of an adjective?

    I'm studying English.

    A... Tom cannot speak any other languages than English.

    B... Tom cannot speak any languages other than English.

    Are they both fine?  Thanks.

    4 AnswersWords & Wordplay3 months ago
  • Do you ever consider "L" and "R" are similar?

    I'm studying English.

    To the ears of the speakers of my mother tongue, L and R sound almost the same and are very hard to distinguish.  For example, "clap" and "crap", "election" and "erection", "free" and "flee" sound almost exactly the same.

    I'd like to ask native English speakers whether or not you ever consider the two sound similar.  Do you think they are as close as "bat" and "bad"?  Or do they sound as different as "free" and "tree"?

    If a foreigner says "flend", do you think you can understand that they actually meant to say "friend"?  Or are you more likely to consider it as another word such as "fend" or "fled"?

    I want to know how native speakers consider foreigners' pronunciation.  Thank you in advance.

    10 AnswersLanguages4 months ago
  • Pronunciation of th?

    I know how to pronounce th sound in English but many languages including my mother tongue do not have the sound.

    I'd like to ask native English speakers how you feel when you hear words whose th is replaced by another sound, such as "s" and "t".

    People from my country pronounce "thank you" like "sankyuu".  "Th" sounds very similar to "s" to the ears of my people.  What do you think of that?  Do you ever consider "th" is similar to "s" and "z"?

    People from some countries replace "th" with "t", pronouncing "thank you" like "tankyuu".  Do you think "th" is close to "t"?

    I'd like to know how native speakers find foreign pronunciation.  Thank you in advance.

    4 AnswersLanguages4 months ago
  • "some apples" or "apples"?

    I'm studying English.  How do you explain the difference between the two sentences below?

    A1) There are apples on the table.

    A2) There are some apples on the table.

    Is A1 unnatural?

    B1) I've got apples in my bag.

    B2) I've got some apples in my bag.

    Is B1 unnatural?

    I wonder when plural forms without "some" sound unnatural because my mother tongue does not have a word corresponding to "some".

    If A1 and B1 are as OK as A2 and B2, how do you describe the difference? 

    Thank you in advance.

    2 AnswersLanguages4 months ago
  • visit it? visit there?

    I'm studying English.  What do you think of the sentences below?

    A1) You are from Paris?  Oh, I'd like to visit it one day.

    A2) You are from Paris? Oh, I'd like to visit there one day.

    Strictly speaking, I think "to visit it" is grammatically correct since "to visit" is a transitive verb.  But what do you think of A2?  Does it sound awkward to native English speakers?  If I wrote "to visit there" on a thesis, would a teacher correct it?

    How about the sentences below?

    B1) What did you visit in France?

    B2) Where did you visit in France?

    How do they sound?  Grammatically speaking, I think B1 is correct, but is B2 unnatural?  Would a teacher correct it if I used the phrase in an essay?

    Thank you in advance.

    3 AnswersWords & Wordplay4 months ago
  • Nice to meet you? Nice meeting you?

    I'm studying English.  I'd like to know the difference between to-infinitives and gerunds.

    A1) Nice to meet you.

    A2) Nice meeting you.

    What is the difference?  I think I often hear A1 when two people meet and A2 when they part, like "Hello. I'm Bob. Nice to meet you." and "Nice meeting you, John. See you next time."  Is my understanding correct?

    B1) I like to play the piano.

    B2) I like to playing the piano.

    Is there any difference between them?  My textbook says there's no difference between "like to do" and "like doing".  Is it correct?

    C1) It's fun to play basketball.

    C2) It's fun playing basketball.

    My textbook mentions only C1 and says no comment about the difference between the two.  What is it?

    Thank you in advance.

    3 AnswersWords & Wordplay4 months ago
  • The difference between "思います" and "考えます"?

    Japanese language.

    What's the difference between 思います and 考えます? 

    1 AnswerLanguages4 months ago
  • "three years in a row" "for the third year in a row"?

    "They won the championship three years in a row."

    "They won the championship for the third year in a row."

    Are they both grammatically OK and the same?  I'm studying English.  Thank you in advance.

    2 AnswersWords & Wordplay4 months ago
  • "first time to do"? "first time doing"?

    Which sentence is more natural.

    A) This is my first time to climb Mt. Fuji.

    B) This is my first time climbing Mt. Fuji.

    My textbook says that B is correct and A is not.  Is it true?  Is A unnatural?

    Is B the same as "This is the first time that I've climbed Mt. Fuji."?

    I'm studying English.  Thank you in advance.

    3 AnswersLanguages4 months ago
  • Singular they?

    I'm studying English and I've got a question about the singular they.

    Imagine you saw someone behind the wall.  You didn't see the person clearly, so you don't know whether the person is a boy or a girl but you guessed that the person is a student.""I saw someone behind the wall.  I think they are a student."Is this sentence correct?  Is it OK to say "they are a student" when you use "they" as a singular pronoun?Thank you in advance/

    6 AnswersWords & Wordplay4 months ago
  • We have a nose?  We have noses?

    Which do you think is more natural?

    A1) We have a nose.

    A2) We have noses.

    Which do you think is more natural when each student is issued with one tablet PC?

    B1) The school provided all the students with a tablet PC.

    B2) The school provided all the students with tablet PCs.

    Could B1 lead to misunderstanding that they share one tablet PC?  Or can it convey the meaning that I want to tell?

    How about B2?  Does it sound like each student has more than one PC?

    I'm studying English and I'm always complicated whether I should use a singular noun or a plural noun.

    Thank you in advance.

    1 AnswerWords & Wordplay4 months ago
  • "Dogs have a tail"? "Dogs have tails"?

    I'm studying English.  I always have trouble choosing singular form and plural form.

    Each dog has one tail.  When you want to describe this fact, which is more likely to be used?

    A1) Unlike humans, dogs have a tail.

    A2) Unlike humans, dogs have tails.

    If each student is given one textbook, which would teachers say?

    B1) Students are to bring their textbook in the excursion.

    B2) Students are to bring their textbooks in the excursion.

    I wonder whether they are both fine and can convey the same meaning or one is natural and the other is unnatural.

    Thank you in advance.

    2 AnswersLanguages4 months ago
  • With one blow?  In one blow?

    A) I knocked him down with one blow.

    B) I knocked him down in one blow.

    What's the difference?  I'm studying English.  Thank you in advance.

    3 AnswersLanguages4 months ago
  • the difference between "have been playing" and "have played" ?

    "I have played basketball for three years."

    "I have been playing basketball for three years."

    Do they convey the same meaning?  Are they both natural?

    I'm studying English.  Thank you in advance.

    6 AnswersLanguages4 months ago
  • How would you describe the difference between "if I'm late" and "if I will be late"?

    I'm studying English.  Many textbooks say that you don't use "will" in when-clauses and if-clauses even if you are mentioning future.

    However, I have seen some sentences using will inside if-clauses.

    What is the difference between the two below?

    A) I'll call you if I'm late.

    B) I'll call you if I'll be late.

    My understanding is like this.

    A...The promised time is 10 a.m..  I call the person at ten or later in case I have not reach the place yet.

    B...The promised time is 10 a.m.. I call the person before ten in case I am sure I won't make it in time.

    Is my understanding correct?  If not, please tell me the difference between the two sentences.

    Thank you in advance.

    3 AnswersWords & Wordplay4 months ago