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Brett

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Questions115
  • Where to place an adjective?

    I'm studying English.

    A) the planet closest to earth

    B) the closest planet to earth

    Is there any difference?

    5 AnswersWords & Wordplay3 months ago
  • "I think that..." When do you take a breath, before or after "that"?

    I'm studying English.

    "I think that it's going to rain tomorrow." or what ever.

    I've been wondering which is the better way to read it.

    [I think] [that it's going to rain tomorrow.]

    [I think that] [it's going to rain tomorrow.]

    How do native speakers read this sentence?  Thank you in advance.

    2 AnswersWords & Wordplay3 months ago
  • How to say "Paris is a good city in which to raise children" in conversation?

    I'm studying English.

    I learnt that "Paris is a good city in which to raise children" is grammatically correct but so formal that none would say it in conversation.

    Then what is the natural way to say "Paris is a good city in which to raise children" in conversation?  Thank you in advance.

    8 AnswersWords & Wordplay3 months ago
  • "Paris is a nice city to raise children."  Is this sentence grammatically correct?

    I'm studying English.

    Since you say that you raise children IN the city, do you need to add an "in" in the sentence?  i.e.  "Parice is a nice city to raise children in."  or  "Paris is a nice city where to raise children."

    Which sentence is correct?  Thank you in advance.

    5 AnswersWords & Wordplay3 months ago
  • The apple is my favourite fruit?  Apples are my favourite fruits?

    I'm studying English.  Which sentence makes the most sense?

    A) Apple is my favourite fruit.

    B) An apple is my favourite fruit.

    C) Apples are my favourite fruits.

    D) The apple is my favourite fruit.

    E) The apples are my favourite fruits.

    I also want to know which of the below is the best.

    A) My favourite fruit is apple.

    B) My favourite fruit is an apple.

    C) My favourite fruits are apples.

    D) My favourite fruit is the apple.

    E) My favourite fruits are the apples.

    Please tell me if there's any better way to describe it.  I'm always confused about singular and plural.

    Thank you in advance. 

    1 AnswerLanguages3 months ago
  • My answers are often dismissed.  Why?

    I can see my answers when I use my account, but when I log out, I can't see my answers.  

    It often happens for some reason.  I have no idea why.  Does anyone know why?

    8 AnswersYahoo Answers3 months ago
  • How to use "the ...est of the ..."?

    I'm studying English and heard a sentence, "It'd be the lamest of the lame."

    How do you use "the ...est of the..."?  Is this phrase applied to all adjectives?

    >>"The man is the craziest of the crazy."

    >>"The girl is the cutest of the cute."

    Do these sentences make sense?

    I also want to know if you can use this phrase with "the most...", like

    >>"The lady is the most beautiful of the beautiful."

    Is this OK?

    Thank you in advance.

    3 AnswersLanguages3 months ago
  • Knowledge of computer? a computer? computers? the computer?

    I'm studying English and want to ask about grammar.

    When you want to mention a man who's a computer expert, which sentence would be the best?

    A) He has a great knowledge of computer.

    B) He has a great knowledge of a computer.

    C) He has a great knowledge of computers.

    D) He has a great knowledge of the computer.

    E) He has a great knowledge of the computers.

    I want to know how to say when I want to mention "computer" as a concept, not a real thing.

    Thank you in advance.

    1 AnswerLanguages3 months ago
  • Having lived in NY 10 years?  for 10 years?

    "I have lived in NY 10 years."

    "I have lived in NY for 10 years."

    I am studying English and learnt at school that you use "for" in front of a span of time when you use the present perfect tense.  I, however, have seen some sentences without "for".  I've been wondering whether a sentence without "for" is grammatically correct or it's an expression used only in conversation and cannot be used in exams and theses.

    Thank you in advance.

    2 AnswersWords & Wordplay3 months ago
  • increase by 15%?  increase 15%?

    "The population in the country increased by 15% over the last decade."

    "The population in the country increased 15% over the last decade."

    Are they both fine?

    3 AnswersLanguages3 months ago
  • Please check my English.?

    I'm studying English.  Please check if there's any mistake in the sentence below.  If any, please show how I should change it.

    "We use language as a tool to express things in our own way, just like we use scissors to cut paper into whatever shape we like."

    Thank you in advance.

    7 AnswersLanguages5 months ago
  • Do you say "What time is it now?" Is it natural English or not?

    I'm a foreign student studying English.

    I learned that you say "What time is it now?" when you want to know the time.

    But another book says that this expression sounds weird to native speakers and that they say "Do you have the time?" instead.

    I wonder whether the expression "What time is it now" really sounds weird or not. If so, please tell me why you think it sounds weird and what expression I should use instead. Since situations might be different from country to country, please let me know where you are from, too.

    Thank you very much.

    8 AnswersLanguages8 years ago
  • Why does the U.S. still consider Cuba as an enemy?

    The cold war ended long ago. Is there any reason for the U.S. to hate Cuba now?

    8 AnswersPolitics8 years ago
  • Have you ever said "How do you do?" in your real life?

    I am a foreign student studying English.

    I learnt that you say "How do you do?" when you meet someone for the first time, which means I learnt "How do you do?" is the English counterpart of French "Enchanté".

    However, I still have never seen anyone say "How do you do?" in English speaking countries. Do you really use "How do you do" in your real life? If not, what do you say when you meet someone for the first time?

    Thank you.

    6 AnswersOther - Society & Culture8 years ago
  • Do the British include people from Northern Ireland?

    In other words, does the word, the British people or the Britons, include people who have the U.K. citizenship but live outside the island?

    Thank you.

    4 AnswersLanguages8 years ago
  • Why is Japan considered as the most favorable country in the world?

    http://www.globescan.com/images/images/pressreleas...

    According to this survey conducted by the BBC, Japan is thought to have the most positive influence on the world. What do you think is the reason it is? What kind of positive influence does Japan have?

    Thank you?

    2 AnswersOther - Society & Culture8 years ago
  • Why is American English closer to Queen's English than Scottish English is?

    I find Scottish English very different from what I learnt at school in my country. But both American English and Queen's English are understandable to me. Why is Scottish English more different from Queen's English than American English though it Scotland is closer to England than America is?

    Thank you.

    1 AnswerLanguages8 years ago
  • "I love you." "Me, too." Is this a correct response?

    I am worried about whether or not this "Me, too" can be interpreted as "I love me".

    Does this response mean "I love you, too" or not? Is "Me, too" OK here? How about "So do I"?

    I am not a native speaker of English. Thank you.

    5 AnswersLanguages8 years ago
  • What's so good about gangnam style?

    I don't find it interesting at all... Why is it so popular?

    4 AnswersOther - Music8 years ago