• Complete this sentence: "I wish Donald Trump would..."?

    Best answer: Slap himself in the face if ever Social Security gets cut for elderly retirees.

    Because his retarded wall isn't worth putting Americans out. Especially, if they've earned it. Same for the Republicans in Congress.
    Best answer: Slap himself in the face if ever Social Security gets cut for elderly retirees.

    Because his retarded wall isn't worth putting Americans out. Especially, if they've earned it. Same for the Republicans in Congress.
    10 answers · 14 hours ago
  • Which word is correct?

    Best answer: "I saw the two boys streak down the road on their bicycles." That is how I would say it in Britain. Americans etc might have different ideas. Actually I would more likely use "streaking" rather than "streak". But however you want to form the start the sentence, you must use "on... show more
    Best answer: "I saw the two boys streak down the road on their bicycles." That is how I would say it in Britain. Americans etc might have different ideas. Actually I would more likely use "streaking" rather than "streak".

    But however you want to form the start the sentence, you must use "on their bicycles". The notion of "each on a bicycle" looks simply comical - no native speaker would use that form. I note that others support "each on a bicycle" but that form seems so false to me in Britain, if you were reporting an incident to the police etc.
    10 answers · 3 days ago
  • What does the Fireball word GUS mean?

    8 answers · 18 hours ago
  • What does 'such a' mean in this sentence?

    You're such a lovely person. Is this a nice thing to say abut someone?
    You're such a lovely person. Is this a nice thing to say abut someone?
    12 answers · 2 days ago
  • Congratulations! You SNAGGED free shipping on this order. How informal is the verb SNAG in American English with the sense, "catch; obtain"?

    Can it be used for informal business writing, e.g. in conversational style emails?
    Can it be used for informal business writing, e.g. in conversational style emails?
    6 answers · 1 day ago
  • What words rhyme with Orange??

    Best answer: I once had wondered what other word rhymes with the word orange as well.

    Orange has almost no perfect rhymes. The only word in the 20-volume historical Oxford English Dictionary that rhymes with orange is sporange, a very rare alternative form of sporangium (a botanical term for a part of a fern or similar plant).
    Best answer: I once had wondered what other word rhymes with the word orange as well.

    Orange has almost no perfect rhymes. The only word in the 20-volume historical Oxford English Dictionary that rhymes with orange is sporange, a very rare alternative form of sporangium (a botanical term for a part of a fern or similar plant).
    11 answers · 4 days ago
  • Anne Frank once said "In spite of everything, I still believe people are good at heart!" I wonder, did she still believe that while she was?

    dying in Bergen-Belsen concentration camp??? Did she think the Nazis were good at heart after they murdered her mother and sister? People are NOT good at heart! They don't even have a heart!
    dying in Bergen-Belsen concentration camp??? Did she think the Nazis were good at heart after they murdered her mother and sister? People are NOT good at heart! They don't even have a heart!
    5 answers · 14 hours ago
  • Is this sentence grammatically?

    Best answer: It's very grammatically. Or grammatical, as some people say. Seriously, it is grammatical and in fact a good example of the rarely used future perfect progressive. For those who don't understand, if the speaker was speaking 24 hours later, he or she would say "they have been flying for a few... show more
    Best answer: It's very grammatically. Or grammatical, as some people say.

    Seriously, it is grammatical and in fact a good example of the rarely used future perfect progressive.

    For those who don't understand, if the speaker was speaking 24 hours later, he or she would say "they have been flying for a few hours.' Since it's in the future, it's "they will have been flying for a few hours."

    It might be a bit easier and more understandable to put "by this time tomorrow" at the beginning of the sentence.
    8 answers · 2 days ago
  • Why do people use the word 'now' in a sentence?

    Best answer: Because they want to emphasize the immediacy of the situation.
    Best answer: Because they want to emphasize the immediacy of the situation.
    6 answers · 22 hours ago
  • Is "piss" a curse word?

    Best answer: No. It's considered vulgar. I should add, curse words are ones like G* d damn or Jesus Christ, in anger or " Damn you" directed at a person. Many people consider f* ck a curse word but it's actually vulgar. P* ss sh*t and f* ck all came from Anglo Saxon words. When the Normans invaded England, the... show more
    Best answer: No. It's considered vulgar.
    I should add, curse words are ones like G* d damn or Jesus Christ, in anger or " Damn you" directed at a person.
    Many people consider f* ck a curse word but it's actually vulgar.
    P* ss sh*t and f* ck all came from Anglo Saxon words. When the Normans invaded England, the French language became popular and Anglo words became considered vulgar.
    Hope that helps.
    5 answers · 2 days ago
  • Is it really that hard to understand sarcasm?

    I'm blown away by the amount of people that don't understand it. No I'm not speaking about my sarcasm but in general. I find a lot of people just can't grasp it.
    I'm blown away by the amount of people that don't understand it. No I'm not speaking about my sarcasm but in general. I find a lot of people just can't grasp it.
    4 answers · 10 hours ago
  • How can phrase this sentence without using the word "I realized"?:?

    As my eyes fluttered open–beds were lined up against the wall, holding countless amount of wounded soldiers as nurses rushed about to get to their patients- I realized that I was evacuated to an English hospital.
    As my eyes fluttered open–beds were lined up against the wall, holding countless amount of wounded soldiers as nurses rushed about to get to their patients- I realized that I was evacuated to an English hospital.
    6 answers · 2 days ago
  • What dose noob mean?

    6 answers · 3 days ago
  • Do I need to add an apostrophe?

    Best answer: The second is more often correct. Under assumption that the sentence starts with Microsoft as the first word, Microsoft's focus group participants This refers to Microsoft as a noun/company having possession or ownership of a focus group. The first sentence uses Microsoft as an adjective modifier, awkward... show more
    Best answer: The second is more often correct. Under assumption that the sentence starts with Microsoft as the first word,
    Microsoft's focus group participants
    This refers to Microsoft as a noun/company having possession or ownership of a focus group.
    The first sentence uses Microsoft as an adjective modifier, awkward in making a 3 word adjective modifier of participants.
    It can be done as:
    The Microsoft focus group participants noted...
    or, as part of a series of statements such as:
    Microsoft focus group participants noted...
    Apple focus group participants claimed...
    Linux focus group participants believed...

    Both are correct, depending upon context. English is a language of context.

    New York residents earn more than Chicago residents.
    New York's residents earn more than Chicago's residents.
    Both are grammatically correct. A city can be descriptive as an adjective making a compound noun or as possessing residents. They both mean New Yorkers earn more than Chicagoans.

    I am not comfortable in a choice of a three word adjective set opening a stand-alone sentence referring to Microsoft as a descriptive modifier. Unless you have more context, the second is preferred.
    5 answers · 23 hours ago