• Can you help me with English please?

    Simple or closed: The fractured bone does not break through the skin. I can't understand this sentence! Please help me more clearly. I am very weak in English. Thanks!
    Simple or closed: The fractured bone does not break through the skin. I can't understand this sentence! Please help me more clearly. I am very weak in English. Thanks!
    9 answers · 14 hours ago
  • Which is grammatically correct?

    A. There were brightly colored flowers. B. There were brightly-colored flowers. Thanks!
    A. There were brightly colored flowers. B. There were brightly-colored flowers. Thanks!
    14 answers · 1 day ago
  • Take Mondays OFF the calendoor?

    9 answers · 3 hours ago
  • Could this sentence be grammatically correct?

    Best answer: The sentence is grammatically correct WHEREVER you place the word 'please'. Where you decide to place 'please' is a matter of style, not of grammar. Your sentence is grammatically correct as it stands, and would also be correct if you changed it as other people have suggested. I am a retired... show more
    Best answer: The sentence is grammatically correct WHEREVER you place the word 'please'. Where you decide to place 'please' is a matter of style, not of grammar.
    Your sentence is grammatically correct as it stands, and would also be correct if you changed it as other people have suggested.

    I am a retired English teacher and editor.

    EDIT TO ADD: To my ear, your positioning of ;please' in the middle gives added emphasis. It reads to me as if someone is trying to interrupt, and you are saying impatiently, 'Will you PLEASE let her finish!'

    Whatever the reason for its position, it is GRAMMATICALLY CORRECT.
    12 answers · 3 days ago
  • Army or mariens?

    9 answers · 6 hours ago
  • What's faster? Typing a sentence or writing a sentence?

    Best answer: If it is just 'a sentence' or two, writing is faster. Typing requires more preparations like feeding the paper etc. For longer work, typing is faster and above that, it is neater.
    Best answer: If it is just 'a sentence' or two, writing is faster. Typing requires more preparations like feeding the paper etc. For longer work, typing is faster and above that, it is neater.
    11 answers · 18 hours ago
  • What's the difference between the sentences below?

    "I saw lots of animals when I was on the trip." "I saw lots of animals on the trip" Do the sentences have the same meaning? If so, is there a reason why the "when I was" was omitted?
    "I saw lots of animals when I was on the trip." "I saw lots of animals on the trip" Do the sentences have the same meaning? If so, is there a reason why the "when I was" was omitted?
    9 answers · 1 day ago
  • Which two words will be most appropriate in these blanks?

    There is no________of capital to finance massive infrastructure development provided the projects involving huge investments are________with transparency. 1) dearth, handled 2) deny, managed 3) shortage, completely 4) paucity, direct 5) absent, persuaded
    There is no________of capital to finance massive infrastructure development provided the projects involving huge investments are________with transparency. 1) dearth, handled 2) deny, managed 3) shortage, completely 4) paucity, direct 5) absent, persuaded
    8 answers · 16 hours ago
  • What is the propper name for a band-aid?

    i mean like the name not the brand e.g ford = car
    i mean like the name not the brand e.g ford = car
    9 answers · 1 day ago
  • Is saying dad instead of father considered slang?

    Best answer: No, just informal. While all slang is informal, not all informal English is slang. "Dad" is an informal word for father, not slang. Examples of slang words for father might include "pops" or "daddy-o."
    Best answer: No, just informal. While all slang is informal, not all informal English is slang. "Dad" is an informal word for father, not slang. Examples of slang words for father might include "pops" or "daddy-o."
    10 answers · 1 day ago
  • How common is the phrase AS LONG AS used wth the sense of SINCE in American English?

    As in, As long as you're going to the bakery, please buy some fresh bread. As long as you're here, please stay for dinner. Source: McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/as+long+as Also, is that phrase used with the sense of "since" in... show more
    As in, As long as you're going to the bakery, please buy some fresh bread. As long as you're here, please stay for dinner. Source: McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/as+l... Also, is that phrase used with the sense of "since" in other varieties of English?
    8 answers · 1 day ago
  • I don't know who you are but I don't like you so I'm leaving?

    Best answer: Sayonara, silly goose.
    Best answer: Sayonara, silly goose.
    11 answers · 2 days ago
  • Is this sentence grammatically correct/natural?

    "I really want to tell my parents but they're extremely religious and I don't think they would understand."
    "I really want to tell my parents but they're extremely religious and I don't think they would understand."
    7 answers · 18 hours ago
  • Does the term "false facts" exist?

    for something it to be a fact, it has to be 100 percent true, these 2 words contradict each other. but i've also heard many people say things like "facts that are inaccurate" or "facts that were proven wrong". do those phrases exist?
    for something it to be a fact, it has to be 100 percent true, these 2 words contradict each other. but i've also heard many people say things like "facts that are inaccurate" or "facts that were proven wrong". do those phrases exist?
    27 answers · 4 days ago
  • Is "ruder" a word?

    Best answer: "Ruder" may be used to compare 'rudeness' in different individuals.e.g,. 'He appears ruder than most others in the group'. "More rude' is generally used to compare different qualities in the same individual. e.g., He is more rude than he appears. He is more rude than sensible.
    Best answer: "Ruder" may be used to compare 'rudeness' in different individuals.e.g,. 'He appears ruder than most others in the group'. "More rude' is generally used to compare different qualities in the same individual. e.g., He is more rude than he appears. He is more rude than sensible.
    13 answers · 2 days ago