• Whats the meaning of life?

    15 answers · 2 days ago
  • What is the f word?

    My cousin got in trouble for saying the f word but nobody will tell me what it is.
    My cousin got in trouble for saying the f word but nobody will tell me what it is.
    12 answers · 2 days ago
  • If so many liberals support communism, than why do they hate communist-Russia?

    It just makes no sense.
    It just makes no sense.
    18 answers · 3 days ago
  • What does it mean "Subtle threat"?

    Best answer: subtle means not obvious, hidden in a way that takes effort to be revealed as existing. A subtle threat is generally a veiled threat, but "veiled" means that someone made the effort to hide the threat whereas subtle does not say whether or not there is an effort to hide it. An implied threat is never... show more
    Best answer: subtle means not obvious, hidden in a way that takes effort to be revealed as existing. A subtle threat is generally a veiled threat, but "veiled" means that someone made the effort to hide the threat whereas subtle does not say whether or not there is an effort to hide it. An implied threat is never actually stated but is what is actually stated leaves little doubt that a bad thing will happen if you ignore the statement. Kind of like saying "or else" without saying what the "or" part would be.

    A veiled threat could also be implied, with the hiding (cover, veil) being the use of the implied rather than the direct. "I don't like liars, I beat the crap out of them. You seem to be a liar to me. You might want to stop your lying." I never say (directly or openly) "I will beat the crap out of you (because you are lying)" but it is barely hidden through the implication that I intend to beat the crap out of you if you keep lying.
    7 answers · 16 hours ago
  • Do these sentences mean the same thing?

    Best answer: A is correct. B would be correct if you insert "in" before 1492. Your version of B suggests that you're telling America Columbus discovered 1492.
    Best answer: A is correct. B would be correct if you insert "in" before 1492. Your version of B suggests that you're telling America Columbus discovered 1492.
    9 answers · 2 days ago
  • How do you pronounce evaluated?

    7 answers · 20 hours ago
  • What does pillock mean?

    Best answer: Only a pillock would think that pillock is a compliment.
    Best answer: Only a pillock would think that pillock is a compliment.
    6 answers · 2 days ago
  • Why is British English So Redundant and Otherwise Strange?

    Examples: In the move, "A Night to Remember (1958)," the second class couple, before leaving England, promises to send their relatives a wireless "from the ship." Just where else would they send it from? A crew member who spotted the Californian exclaimed that it was so many "miles"... show more
    Examples: In the move, "A Night to Remember (1958)," the second class couple, before leaving England, promises to send their relatives a wireless "from the ship." Just where else would they send it from? A crew member who spotted the Californian exclaimed that it was so many "miles" away, with heavy emphasis on the word "miles." Was there some uncertainty about the measure of distance? Another crew member assured someone that the Carpathia should be here "any time now," which emphasis on the word "now." What does the word "now" add to the sentence? In other contexts, the British will preface an assertion with "in actual fact." If a "fact" is not "actual" (i.e. true), then it is not a fact. The British refer to an ordinary flashlight as a torch. What do they call a real torch?
    8 answers · 3 days ago
  • Is n’t a word 😱?

    8 answers · 3 days ago
  • Are South Americans, Mexicans, and Canadians considered "Americans" as well? Or is that just the US?

    Best answer: For instance Canada calls itself "Canada" but the US calls itself "United States of America" Then there is Brazil, Argentina, Mexico, etc, but NOT "Canada of America", nor "Mexico of America, Brazil of America", etc. Get the picture now? Since our official name ends in... show more
    Best answer: For instance Canada calls itself "Canada" but the US calls itself "United States of America" Then there is Brazil, Argentina, Mexico, etc, but NOT "Canada of America", nor "Mexico of America, Brazil of America", etc. Get the picture now? Since our official name ends in "America", we can call ourselves "Americans" for short.
    6 answers · 2 days ago
  • What does over compensate mean?

    My friend asked me if I over compensate? She was talking about reading into punctuation. Example: Thanks. Anyone feel like that person is angry when they use periods alot like: I am okay. I don't know. OK.
    My friend asked me if I over compensate? She was talking about reading into punctuation. Example: Thanks. Anyone feel like that person is angry when they use periods alot like: I am okay. I don't know. OK.
    5 answers · 2 days ago
  • Is this phrase grammatically correct "this promising to be successful school year"?

    Best answer: Only @Buster has noticed so far that this COULD be correct, depending on the full context.

    For example, "So now, as a new term begins, we look forward to this promising-to-be-successful school year, and hope for good luck and a following wind."
    Best answer: Only @Buster has noticed so far that this COULD be correct, depending on the full context.

    For example, "So now, as a new term begins, we look forward to this promising-to-be-successful school year, and hope for good luck and a following wind."
    6 answers · 3 days ago
  • What's an innocent tone?

    Best answer: No. As you have detailed, "innocently" applies to their motivation, not their tone.
    Best answer: No. As you have detailed, "innocently" applies to their motivation, not their tone.
    4 answers · 22 hours ago
  • If people who practice Christianity are Christians, then people who practice Norse Mythology are called what?

    Best answer: Sort of like asking what language Europeans speak. There was never a fixed, established, universally practiced "religion" so there is no strict and definable term for that specific generic polytheistic world view. It was not a structured and formalized system so there was no organization that had the... show more
    Best answer: Sort of like asking what language Europeans speak. There was never a fixed, established, universally practiced "religion" so there is no strict and definable term for that specific generic polytheistic world view. It was not a structured and formalized system so there was no organization that had the last word on the "truth", and thus no name that we give to indicate such a unified belief (there was never such a unified belief so no need to name, not proper to name as if it actually was; it was not).

    Probably the most common term would be Old Norse Religion (compare Ancient Roman and Ancient Greek religions). Pagan is too broad a term. Old Norse Religion was a pagan religion, one of many. I have never met a living adherent although I bet there is someone, somewhere, that at least pretends to believe in that Norse pantheon of gods etc.

    Old Norse would be a subset of an entire family of ill-defined but similar religious belief systems that tend to be associated with iron-age societies of northern Europe.
    7 answers · 3 days ago