• By scientific definition, isn't a fetus a human?

    A fetus is considered a separate organism from the parent, and the organism is considered a homo sapien made up of living human cells and tissue. I know science doesn't really take it this far for ethical and philosophical reasons, but wouldn't abortion and incinerating the aborted human organism be murder?
    A fetus is considered a separate organism from the parent, and the organism is considered a homo sapien made up of living human cells and tissue. I know science doesn't really take it this far for ethical and philosophical reasons, but wouldn't abortion and incinerating the aborted human organism be murder?
    75 answers · 5 days ago
  • Are mammals, animals?

    10 answers · 1 day ago
  • How did humans become the top of the food chain if we are so weak and slow?

    Best answer: How did humans become the top of the food chain if we are so weak and slow?
    I think it can go either way.

    ~Peanuts2345
    Best answer: How did humans become the top of the food chain if we are so weak and slow?
    I think it can go either way.

    ~Peanuts2345
    15 answers · 4 days ago
  • Is it true that every human being takes a sht?

    Best answer: Yes
    Best answer: Yes
    9 answers · 3 days ago
  • A question about multivitamins?

    I read that you take digestive enzymes before a meal and then 20 minutes later you take hydrochloric acid. Do I take the multivitamin with the the multivitamin with the enzymes or with the hydrochloric acid?
    I read that you take digestive enzymes before a meal and then 20 minutes later you take hydrochloric acid. Do I take the multivitamin with the the multivitamin with the enzymes or with the hydrochloric acid?
    4 answers · 2 days ago
  • Do you want to live forever?

    9 answers · 3 days ago
  • Why Black Africans the only race to have wooly textured hair & swollen lips?

    Best answer: It is because the Blacks are not fully human. I feel so sorry for them.
    Best answer: It is because the Blacks are not fully human. I feel so sorry for them.
    15 answers · 6 days ago
  • Would it be really confusing to be blind in your left eye and deaf in your right ear?

    Best answer: you would know no different .. your left and right brain dominance does not mean one side of the brain hears better then the other ... it just means that GENERAL thinking goes on in one side or the other .. the typical physical inputs can be connected to either side .. a brain that is damaged can reroute... show more
    Best answer: you would know no different .. your left and right brain dominance does not mean one side of the brain hears better then the other ... it just means that GENERAL thinking goes on in one side or the other .. the typical physical inputs can be connected to either side .. a brain that is damaged can reroute processing of hearing for an area of damage to an area that is not damaged .. NOW this being said CAN means just that .. it doesnt mean it WILL .. just that it is possible ..

    so whether the brain input for the left ear is on the right side or left side is no matter the brain will sort out what ear that is based on other information that it gets..
    4 answers · 18 hours ago
  • Are overly sterile environments for young children a health risk?

    Best answer: This is a popular theory in what I would call popular science right now. We know from experiments that a child raised in a completely sterile environment - as in entirely free of all microorganisms - is very unhealthy, but that's not what we're talking about. There is also some evidence to suggest a... show more
    Best answer: This is a popular theory in what I would call popular science right now. We know from experiments that a child raised in a completely sterile environment - as in entirely free of all microorganisms - is very unhealthy, but that's not what we're talking about. There is also some evidence to suggest a correlation between lack of childhood exposure to pathogens and later health complications, but that evidence is not as compelling as many would like to believe, and there is still some controversy surrounding the whole notion. But, it's out in the wild now among those who only half-understand how science works, so it's pointless to try to argue about it any more.
    9 answers · 5 days ago
  • Why are humans considered to be a part of the ecosystem?

    I know it s because we are living organisms interacting with our physical and chemical environment. But in what ways?
    I know it s because we are living organisms interacting with our physical and chemical environment. But in what ways?
    5 answers · 1 day ago
  • Wife slept with many many random partners befoe marriage(kinky and unrotected too), then will it effect the offspring of her husband)?

    (like DNA impact on child she haves with her husband having so many mens semen inside her before)?
    (like DNA impact on child she haves with her husband having so many mens semen inside her before)?
    15 answers · 7 days ago
  • What evolved sooner? Brain or Heart?

    Best answer: Kind of depends on how you define your terms. There are definitely critters with something that could be considered a brain, that do not have anything that could be considered a heart (for example, I don't think insects have circulatory systems as we understand them, and thus they don't have hearts, but at... show more
    Best answer: Kind of depends on how you define your terms.

    There are definitely critters with something that could be considered a brain, that do not have anything that could be considered a heart (for example, I don't think insects have circulatory systems as we understand them, and thus they don't have hearts, but at least most of them do have brains). And there may also be things that have hearts, but don't really have brains (depending on how much of a neural cluster you count as being a "brain").

    I think, in general, primitive brains developed before primitive hearts, but most things with a relatively complex brain also have a relatively advanced heart.

    I know starfish have a ring brain, which is... kind of nifty.
    8 answers · 5 days ago
  • How is biomass created in a ecosystem?

    4 answers · 2 days ago
  • At what point in its evolution does a subspecies become a species? What is the scientific requirement?

    Best answer: A subspecies is defined as a geographic variant of a species. A subspecies is not necessarily an incipient species, even if some scientists seem to treat them as such. Some species may for example evolve sympatrically (in the same area) as its ancestor, and while it evolved it cannot be classified as a subspecies... show more
    Best answer: A subspecies is defined as a geographic variant of a species. A subspecies is not necessarily an incipient species, even if some scientists seem to treat them as such. Some species may for example evolve sympatrically (in the same area) as its ancestor, and while it evolved it cannot be classified as a subspecies since it is not a geographical variant. Some populations that eventually become a new species may also not be different enough to be classified as a subspecies.

    In many cases, a population becomes adapted to the local environment and it evolve differences that make it classifiable as a subspecies. However, sometimes a subspecies may be the result of neutral genetic drift and the differences are not adaptive even if it is noticeable enough to make it a different subspecies. For example a population of snakes has a neck ring that is interrupted in the middle, but the other populations have a complete neck ring. It is extremely doubtful that such a trivial character is an adaptation to the environment and therefore it may not be evolving into a different species, but it is nevertheless classifiable as a subspecies. If the adaptation to the local environment is drastic enough then a population may become so different ecologically that if it interbreeds with other populations, the hybrids would not be able to compete with one or both parental species. If so, then the hybrids will not be able to survive and the 2 populations may avoid interbreeding in the future due to natural selection against hybridization. If and when that happens, then a new species has evolved. Reproductive isolation, therefore, is how we can tell if a subspecies or a population (that was not classifiable as a distinct subspecies) has become a new species.

    If a new species has evolved from an isolated population, then if and when it comes into contact with the old species again (secondary contact) they may not recognize each other as different (because they still have the same mating call, mating dance, phermone, or color pattern for example) and therefore they may interbreed at first. Because the hybrids are not as fit as either parental species, the two may then evolve premating reproduction isolation (by evolving different mating calls, dances, or color patterns or phermones for example). Their subsequent unwillingness to interbreed will therefore be good evidence that they are different species. Unfortunately, sometimes two populations that are adapted to different local environments may not come into secondary contact, and in those cases scientists would have to determine whether these 2 are different species or 2 different subspecies by comparing them. For example, the bonobo is geographically isolated from the chimpanzee. For a long time, scientists classified them as different subspecies of the same species. More recently scientists have determined that they are so different that if they meet, they may not interbreed, since the hybrids would be unlikely to fit into the lifestyles of either species. That is why most scientists now classify them as different species instead. It would be easier if these two were to come into contact in nature and inform us through their lack of interbreeding that they are indeed different species. But since they do not come into contact, scientists would have to determine their species status based on how different they are and whether they are different enough to refuse to evolve premating reproductive isolation should they meet in the future. Such determination is unavoidably subjective, but there is no objective means of determining species status in such cases.
    8 answers · 4 days ago
  • Possible to have green eye gene if have brown eyes? 5 POINTS FOR BEST ANSWER?

    Best answer: Not if no one in your family has them. To have a recessive green eye gene, one of your parents would have had to have had the recessive gene to pass onto you. That means someone in you're related to has to have green eyes, like a grandparent.
    Best answer: Not if no one in your family has them. To have a recessive green eye gene, one of your parents would have had to have had the recessive gene to pass onto you. That means someone in you're related to has to have green eyes, like a grandparent.
    5 answers · 3 days ago