• Do you think silence is golden?

    25 answers · 1 day ago
  • Is "ain't" a word?

    A lot of people say it's not a word: but, I found it in the dictionary. So, I'm confused.
    A lot of people say it's not a word: but, I found it in the dictionary. So, I'm confused.
    51 answers · 3 days ago
  • What does the o' in o'clock mean?

    Best answer: In the fourteenth century, the mechanical clock was invented. However, not everyone used it yet (some still used sun dials and hourglasses and water clocks, which may use slightly different systems of time). So to emphasize that we are using a "real clock," we say "It's 7 of the... show more
    Best answer: In the fourteenth century, the mechanical clock was invented. However, not everyone used it yet (some still used sun dials and hourglasses and water clocks, which may use slightly different systems of time). So to emphasize that we are using a "real clock," we say

    "It's 7 of the clock."

    But of course something like this always gets abbreviated in the end. In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries more and more people used "o'clock" instead of "of the clock." By the eighteenth century it was widespread, the same time the word Jack-o'-lantern (Jack of the lantern) became popular.

    Today we no longer need to emphasize that our measurements are "of the clock," but apparently we still use the phrase.

    Source: http://gizmodo.com/why-we-say-o-clock-1655979092

    ps. If you go to that page, make sure you check out the bonus facts!
    15 answers · 1 day ago
  • Bacon does not necessarily mean pork?

    36 answers · 4 days ago
  • What does going on holiday mean ?

    i talk to many people online and i have heard from several people.from the uk.. "im on holiday" or "going on holiday" and me being from the US do not understand wat this means... can someone explain?
    i talk to many people online and i have heard from several people.from the uk.. "im on holiday" or "going on holiday" and me being from the US do not understand wat this means... can someone explain?
    19 answers · 3 days ago
  • What does it mean to be called snowflake ?

    I've noticed it's became a popular insult ... But like what dose it even mean?
    I've noticed it's became a popular insult ... But like what dose it even mean?
    12 answers · 19 hours ago
  • Please stop spelling "definitely" incorrectly?

    It is not spelled "definately." It is really starting to bother me.
    It is not spelled "definately." It is really starting to bother me.
    32 answers · 4 days ago
  • What is the meaning of life?

    10 answers · 20 hours ago
  • Difference between refusal and denial?

    Best answer: A: Would you like to come to this concert tomorrow? B: No thanks, it's not my kind of music. = REFUSAL. A: You like the Rolling Stones, don't you? B: No, I don't. = DENIAL. 'Deny' must be followed by something. You can't just say 'He denied'. You have to say 'He denied the... show more
    Best answer: A: Would you like to come to this concert tomorrow?
    B: No thanks, it's not my kind of music. = REFUSAL.

    A: You like the Rolling Stones, don't you?
    B: No, I don't. = DENIAL.

    'Deny' must be followed by something. You can't just say 'He denied'. You have to say 'He denied the allegation' or He denied the accusation' or 'He denied that he liked the Rolling Stones'.
    We NEVER 'deny' an invitation; we 'refuse' it.
    11 answers · 1 day ago
  • In one word, describe Trump?

    102 answers · 7 days ago
  • What does "rotoscoping" mean? and what is the origin of this word?

    Best answer: Rotoscoping is a very old technique for animation. You take a film of a live actor doing something, then you trace over the film frame-by-frame and now you have an animation. It was used in the earliest days of animation, in the 1910s, when animation was just a curiosity. It was really perfected by the Fleischer... show more
    Best answer: Rotoscoping is a very old technique for animation. You take a film of a live actor doing something, then you trace over the film frame-by-frame and now you have an animation. It was used in the earliest days of animation, in the 1910s, when animation was just a curiosity. It was really perfected by the Fleischer Bros. and Disney.

    If you ever saw Snow White and the Seven Dwarves, Disney's first full-length animated feature, you can see many scenes where the characters look and move almost too human. One scene is where Snow White and the dwarves dance at the little party they hold in the dwarves' house. It was very hard to make cartoon characters dance realistically so Disney had live actors dance and then traced their movements, and you can tell to watch it.

    In these modern days of CGI you'd think rotoscoping would have gone out of style years ago. But it's still used today!
    7 answers · 8 hours ago
  • Do you get annoyed by people who say lol at everything?

    Why do people feel the need to add LOL to the end of every sentence? Why are more and more people persistently using this pointless 'expression. Some people say i got drunk other night lol. What was the point to add lol in that...some use lmao too...both make same sense. My gf was unable talk with me for few... show more
    Why do people feel the need to add LOL to the end of every sentence? Why are more and more people persistently using this pointless 'expression. Some people say i got drunk other night lol. What was the point to add lol in that...some use lmao too...both make same sense. My gf was unable talk with me for few days. I asked her sister is she fine? She said yeah lool. i know there was no point to add lol der but still people do.
    20 answers · 3 days ago
  • 'I live in London for three years.' Is this sentence grammatically correct?

    I'm not a native speaker of English. I would like native speakers of English to answer this question. "I live in London for three years." Do you think this sentence is grammatically correct? I learned that you have to say either "I have lived in London for three years." or "I have... show more
    I'm not a native speaker of English. I would like native speakers of English to answer this question. "I live in London for three years." Do you think this sentence is grammatically correct? I learned that you have to say either "I have lived in London for three years." or "I have been living in London for three years." and that "I live in London for three years." is wrong. If this sentence is correct, would you please tell me the difference between "I live in London for three years." and "I have lived in London for three years." and in what situation you think you could say "I live in London for three years." Thank you.
    10 answers · 1 day ago
  • 'He wished he had the whiskey straight up right now' What does 'straight up' mean here?

    Best answer: It means "without ice"'; not "on the rocks." Since it is a manner of service, then tipping a bottle will usually be to pour and not to drink. In some circles, service "straight up" instead of just "up" would refer especially to unmixed, straight liquor (to wit, bourbon... show more
    Best answer: It means "without ice"'; not "on the rocks." Since it is a manner of service, then tipping a bottle will usually be to pour and not to drink. In some circles, service "straight up" instead of just "up" would refer especially to unmixed, straight liquor (to wit, bourbon whiskey) as opposed to blended or diluted whisky. But that is not a hard-and-fast rule.
    7 answers · 18 hours ago
  • What does this mean? "People of color can't take or steal things from white people because they never actually owned it in the first place."?

    I've seen this more and more and some people say it's because America never 'belonged' to white people, but others say that it is because America was built on the backs of people of color, so they are the one's who truly own the fruits of their labor and not white people. I understand the... show more
    I've seen this more and more and some people say it's because America never 'belonged' to white people, but others say that it is because America was built on the backs of people of color, so they are the one's who truly own the fruits of their labor and not white people. I understand the context, but isn't this a little too harsh, or too blanketing of a statement?
    12 answers · 2 days ago
  • When making a sentence, can you omit the subject when using it a second time for a different verb.?

    Example: "He ran, and was soon gone". versus "He ran, and he was soon gone". Can you use the first one with the comma. "He ran and was soon gone" is fine, but if you put in a comma to better structure the sentence and separate details, is it still grammatically correct?
    Example: "He ran, and was soon gone". versus "He ran, and he was soon gone". Can you use the first one with the comma. "He ran and was soon gone" is fine, but if you put in a comma to better structure the sentence and separate details, is it still grammatically correct?
    7 answers · 1 day ago
  • What does ''drink bleach'' mean?

    i was just wondering because a girl told me to drink bleach. is it literal or has some meaning?
    i was just wondering because a girl told me to drink bleach. is it literal or has some meaning?
    16 answers · 4 days ago
  • Explain like I'm 12: What is the opposite of love: Hate or indifference?

    Hate because they are on opposites sides of the spectrum. Strong like vs strong dislike. Indifference is in the middle. You could say the opposite of happiness and sadness is indifference by that logic.
    Hate because they are on opposites sides of the spectrum. Strong like vs strong dislike. Indifference is in the middle. You could say the opposite of happiness and sadness is indifference by that logic.
    10 answers · 2 days ago