What is the name for @ in the English language and how many diferent names it has ?

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  • 1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    it is normaly called "At the Rate"

    its mostly used in emailid like

    bob@yahoomail.com means bob'attherate'yahoomail.com

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It is just called the "at" sign. It is NOT the ampersand, that is the & sign. Here's the history behind the @ sign:

    - On the Internet, @ (pronounced "at" or "at sign" or "address sign") is the symbol in an e-mail address that separates the name of the user from the user's Internet address, as in this hypothetical e-mail address example: msmuffet@tuffet.org.

    In business, @ is a symbol meaning "at" or "each." For example, it means "each" in "4 apples @ $.35 = $1.40." Perhaps because it was one of the standard characters designed into typewriters (usually with the upper shift key pressed), the @ was chosen for inclusion as one of the special characters in the ASCII set of characters that became standard for computer keyboards, programs, and online message transmission. In July, 1972, as the specifications for the File Transfer Protocol (FTP) were being written, someone suggested including some e-mail programs written by Ray Tomlinson, an engineer at Bolt Beranek and Newman, chief contractor on ARPANET (Advanced Research Projects Agency Network), the precursor of the Internet. In their book, Where Wizards Stay Up Late, Katie Hafner and Matthew Lyon describe how the @ sign got there:

    Tomlinson....became better known for a brilliant (he called it obvious) decision he made while writing [the e-mail] programs. He needed a way to separate, in the e-mail address, the name of the user from the machine the user was on. How should that be denoted? He wanted a character that would not, under any circumstances, be found in the user's name. He looked down at the keyboard he was using, a Model 33 Teletype, which almost everyone else on the Net used, too. In addition to the letters and numerals there were about a dozen punctuation marks. "I got there first, so I got to choose any punctuation I wanted," Tomlinson said. "I chose the @ sign." The character also had the advantage of meaning "at" the designated institution. He had no idea he was creating an icon for the wired world.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It is not an ampersand. That is the name for the symbol meaning "and" (i.e., "&"). It is sometimes referred to, however, as an ampersat.

    The "@" sign originated as a scribe's quick way of writing the Latin word ad, especially in lists of prices of commodities. It is usually known as 'the at sign' or 'the at symbol', which is good enough for most people. It is sometimes called 'commercial a', and occasionally by the French name arrobe or arroba. It has acquired various nicknames in other languages, but none has so far caught on in English.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    good question indeed. I always though it was called "alias" as this is what we call it here in Malaysia: Robert @ Jumali bin Rupert means the 'real' name of the guy is Jumali, his father is Rupert, but his common calling name is Robert...

    Just 'wikipedia'd' it and there it says the following:

    {The at sign (@, read aloud in English as "at") is a typographic symbol most commonly used as an abbreviation in accounting and commercial invoices, in statements such as "7 widgets @ $2 ea. = $14". More recently, the at symbol has become ubiquitous due to its use in email addresses.

    It is often referred to informally as the at symbol, the at sign, the ampersat, the commat, or just at. It has the official name commercial at in the ANSI/CCITT/Unicode character encoding standards.}

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  • 1 decade ago

    The at sign (@, read aloud in English as "at") is a typographic symbol most commonly used as an abbreviation in accounting and commercial invoices, in statements such as "7 widgets @ $2 ea. = $14". More recently, the at symbol has become ubiquitous due to its use in email addresses.

    It is often referred to informally as the at symbol, the at sign, the ampersat, the commat, or just at. It has the official name commercial at in the ANSI/CCITT/Unicode character encoding standards.

  • 1 decade ago

    The ampersand is "&".

    You must be thinking about the "ampersat" which is another name for the at-sign or commercial-at.

    @ is the arobase/arobace/arobas/ampersat/commercial-at/at-sign.

    shtrudel in israeli

    apestaart in dutch

    snabel or kanelbulle in swedish

    chiocciola in italian.

    It is however most commonly known in english as the "At sign". But we in IT we call it by it's name : arobace/arobas or at-sign...depending how fancy or busy we are.

    Source(s): IT Pro
  • 1 decade ago

    It has the official name "commercial at" in the ANSI/CCITT/Unicode character encoding standards.

    It is often referred to informally as the "at symbol", the "at sign", the "ampersat", the "commat", or just "at".

    It's not an ampersand, the ampersand is "&".

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It is not an ampersand this "&" is an ampersand. I don't know what it is called but I know it means "at". GREAT QUESTION! I have often wondered what it is called. Thanks for asking! I will keep an eye on your question for the answer! I hope someone out there knows the answer!

  • hafner
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    The "ampersat" it extremely is yet another call for the at-signal or commercial-at. @ is the arobase/arobace/arobas. shtrudel in israeli apestaart in dutch snabel or kanelbulle in swedish chiocciola in italian. that's notwithstanding maximum usually popular in english because the "At signal". yet we in IT we call it by that's call : arobace/arobas

  • tosha
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    Wow! Thank you! Just what I was searching for. I looked for the answers on the internet but I couldn't find them.

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