How exactly do Pit Bull owners explain this?

Its a difficult question. But I have to ask. I keep reading here on YA how Pit Bulls are unfairly categorized, and that its the owner, not the dog and all that stuff (course that flies in the face of the same people who write dog behavior is genetic - not learned which means its the dog - not the owner).... show more Its a difficult question. But I have to ask. I keep reading here on YA how Pit Bulls are unfairly categorized, and that its the owner, not the dog and all that stuff (course that flies in the face of the same people who write dog behavior is genetic - not learned which means its the dog - not the owner).

Anyway, as unpopular as it is, how exactly do Pit Bull owners explain the number of bite incidents reported in this document?

The document is called:

Dog Attack Deaths and Maimings, U.S. & Canada September
1982 to January 1, 2008

To give you an idea here are some comparative numbers on recorded number of dog attacks on people from the same document:

Akitas: 48
Boxer: 35
Presa: 39
Chow: 51
Dobe: 12
GSD: 71

And now (drum roll please)......

The Winner is: Pit Bulls - total number of reported dog bites in the period between 1982 to 2008:

1312

I'm wondering how exactly Pit Bull owners defend this? A serious question, hopefully people can give objective responses.

http://www.scribd.com/doc/11249213/Dog-A...
Update: @Greyhound: Why is it inflammatory to ask a serious question about a document published by a 3rd party with no inherent bias? Are you suggesting this is some conspiracy theory? Is the entire world out to get Pit Bulls? And if its popularity then do some math. Even if you add the bite stats from the 6 breeds... show more @Greyhound: Why is it inflammatory to ask a serious question about a document published by a 3rd party with no inherent bias? Are you suggesting this is some conspiracy theory? Is the entire world out to get Pit Bulls? And if its popularity then do some math. Even if you add the bite stats from the 6 breeds listed (and Rottis were about 400) - you still don't come CLOSE to Pit Bull bites. Are you stating the Pit Bull population is GREATER in NA than all those 7 breeds combined? Does that seem reasonable?
Update 2: Quote from article: There is a persistent allegation by pit bull terrier advocates that pit bulls are over-represented because of misidentifications or because "pit bull" is, according to them, a generic term covering several similar types of dog. However, the frequency of pit bull attacks among these... show more Quote from article:
There is a persistent allegation by pit bull terrier advocates that pit bulls are over-represented because of misidentifications or because "pit bull" is, according to them, a generic term covering several similar types of dog. However, the frequency of pit bull attacks among these worst-in-10,000 cases is so disproportionate that even if half of the attacks in the pit bull category were misattributed, or even if the pit bull category was split three ways, attacks by pit bulls and their closest relatives would still outnumber attacks by any other breed.
Update 3: More stats: If you look at the bottom - the TOTAL number of reported dog bites for all breeds listed (I didn't add them up but would estimate over 100) is 2524. Pit Bulls account for HALF of the total bites reported. Is it mathematically probable that Pit Bulls are 100 x more popular than all other breeds combined? show more More stats: If you look at the bottom - the TOTAL number of reported dog bites for all breeds listed (I didn't add them up but would estimate over 100) is 2524. Pit Bulls account for HALF of the total bites reported.

Is it mathematically probable that Pit Bulls are 100 x more popular than all other breeds combined?
Update 4: Greeks point is actually the heart of my question.

If we accept that genetics is responsible for breed behavior, ergo the dog is bred that way, then why does it matter who owns it?
Update 5: Last add: The report clearly states the reported bites are "attacks doing bodily harm". While no one disputes a Chi or Yorkie can bite, its almost impossible for a dog this size to do bodily harm to a human. If we want to go down that road, I was bitten by my hamster as a child. My parents didn't report that... show more Last add: The report clearly states the reported bites are "attacks doing bodily harm". While no one disputes a Chi or Yorkie can bite, its almost impossible for a dog this size to do bodily harm to a human. If we want to go down that road, I was bitten by my hamster as a child. My parents didn't report that either.
Update 6: @Greek: A serious question. If the breed is bred and preserved as per your definition, but dog-on-dog combat is no longer tolerated by society (in Canada anyway and I think its true of the US as well) who in society should own this breed and why? Or said another way, why do we need Pitbulls if their sole purpose... show more @Greek: A serious question. If the breed is bred and preserved as per your definition, but dog-on-dog combat is no longer tolerated by society (in Canada anyway and I think its true of the US as well) who in society should own this breed and why? Or said another way, why do we need Pitbulls if their sole purpose is to kill other dogs which is illegal?
Update 7: @Poppy. Recommend opening the report. The document identifies crosses separately. If you add the Pit crosses - it adds about 75 more bites. Also, the number of deaths for PB is 131 or about 10% of bites resulting in bodily harm. The Rotti is the 2nd worse at 61 deaths - still less than half of all PB.
Update 8: @PitbullPassion: If we bred as per standard (dog bred for dog-on-dog combat), then how does one socialize a Pitbull if their temperament is genetically hard wired to be dog aggressive? Isn't the words Pitbull and socialization an oxymoron? Or, are you advocating the breed temperament be changed to encourage a... show more @PitbullPassion: If we bred as per standard (dog bred for dog-on-dog combat), then how does one socialize a Pitbull if their temperament is genetically hard wired to be dog aggressive? Isn't the words Pitbull and socialization an oxymoron?

Or, are you advocating the breed temperament be changed to encourage a more dog social, society friendly dog?
Update 9: @PitbullPassion. Ok I appreciate your response. I honestly don't have an answer - beyond saying when Ontario made dogs biting anything (dog or cat or person) a criminal offense in 2005 - the number of serious dog bites went down SIGNIFICANTLY. Its hard to be completely objective about PB (here) because at the... show more @PitbullPassion. Ok I appreciate your response. I honestly don't have an answer - beyond saying when Ontario made dogs biting anything (dog or cat or person) a criminal offense in 2005 - the number of serious dog bites went down SIGNIFICANTLY. Its hard to be completely objective about PB (here) because at the same time they made it a crime for ALL dogs to bite - they implemented BSL for PB (only) - which of course resulted in hundreds of PBs being surrendered and euthanized. So would those dogs have bitten if they were still alive? We will never know - people abandoned ship rather than take the risk.
Update 10: Here is another report from NW Australia for years 2005-2010 - rates breed that has most # of dog bites per breed population. And AGAIN, Pit Bull is the highest with a score of 1 bite for every 103 dogs. (And for those that think Chi's are vicious, they rated 1 bite for every 13,959... show more Here is another report from NW Australia for years 2005-2010 - rates breed that has most # of dog bites per breed population. And AGAIN, Pit Bull is the highest with a score of 1 bite for every 103 dogs. (And for those that think Chi's are vicious, they rated 1 bite for every 13,959 dogs).

http://www.scribd.com/doc/61222125/NSW-A...



Update 11: Here is a description of the bites in 2006. One dog was shot 24 times by a police person before it stopped attacking. Warning: This report is really difficult to read.

http://www.scribd.com/doc/12090999/Pit-B...
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