Is Song of the South racist? (answers only from people who have seen it please)?

I remember watching Song of the South when I was too young to know what racism was... it's out in the UK... easy to find...

I don't remember if it was racist or not - I simply wasn't aware of those things when I was younger.. and I own the video, but since my video player is broken I was wondering - what do people think?

Racist? Or just a nice Disney film about a nice old man who helped out a couple of little kids?

Update:

I'm not racist - I just want to know if the film is... Actually I'm extremely anti-racism and left-wing...

8 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    Most early cartoons such as those from Disney, as well as the Warner bros., like the looney toons and the like were racist in subtle ways. Especially with their depiction of other races, like blacks portrayed as "mammys" or the aunt Jamima type servant wearing a scarf and doing all the cleaning. Or like a popular television cartoon I used to watch when I was young, in the US, called Johnny Quest by hanna barbara, and its depiction of the indian kid named Hadji playing the quintessential "Indian" sidekick that's not too bright while the blond haired, blue eyed Johnny Quest was the hero. For the most part these cartoons reflected the times when they were made and for anything made in the 60's or earlier it is very common to see something that seems racist, only indirectly. It is much the same in live action movies also.

  • 1 decade ago

    It's based on the Uncle Remus stories, and I've seen it a couple of times. I honestly don't remember what it was that people said was racist about it , as most of it was animated animals.

    Our Current Events teacher in high school had a copy that he converted from PAL to NTSC, he used it in class. I remember him saying his original copy was from the UK because it's apparently not sold in the US.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    You go girl!! I haven't seen the movie, but I saw several clips from the internet (go on google.com then type in song of the south) and there is NOTHING racist about it. I think that the only reason why they think that is because the little boy's mother wouldn't let him hear stories from Uncle Remus, but there were good reasons. IT IS NOT RACIST AND I DON'T THINK IT SHOULD BE BANNED IN THE US!!!!

    Source(s): www.google.com (video)
  • I think you have to take it in context. The time frame in which this movie was made was also the time frame for mammie and other stereotypical roles for blacks. Blacks weren't allowed to play anything else besides the "friendley, smiling" servants to whites, who also could tap dance. Shown in today's context, the movie can seem quite upsetting to blacks who no longer have to sing and dance slave songs in order to be an actor or actress.

    So, no I don't think it's racist, just a harsh reminder of what people once thought of blacks.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Absolutely not, in fact it portrays the black people in a very favorable light. It's just a nice Disney film about a nice old man who helped out a couple of little kids. Black people will complain about ANYTHING and EVERYTHING constantly. You'll never be able to please them.

  • 1 decade ago

    Nope. not even close.

    It's only "deemed" as racist by certain viewers becuase they see the movie as not an accurate portrayal of a southern plantation.

    It showed the blacks as jolly and happy, whcih wasn't quite true back then.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    No, I own the movie in DVD. (Got it from overseas) There was a movement in the late 70's by Black activists that got it banned. Censorship?!?!

    It is a very good movie that does not represent racial issues, does not represent slavery (although you do see servants in it) and shows a very special relationship BETWEEN races.

  • 1 decade ago

    IT'S A RACIST MOVIE because it makes it seem like blacks LOVED slavery. RACIST

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