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Why do we tip staff in certain professional services, but not others?

Are Canadians confused about tipping? While most Canadians are happy to tip the standard 15 per cent at a restaurant, it seems they are far less gracious when it comes to tipping staff in other service jobs, according to a new survey.

Read the news article:

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/s/24072007/3/business-can...

250 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Tipping is not only out of control in Canada, but it plays right into the hand of employers with long pockets and short arms. What's the reason we would tip a Starbucks barista and not an IGA bagger? It's because Starbucks had the balls to put a "karma cup" out. I feel no obligation to help out the Starbucks corporation financially by supplementing the salary of their employees. I thank them, as they should also thank me - for providing the customer base that ensures they continue to have jobs. That's my piece on that.

  • 1 decade ago

    I thinking tipping is getting out of control in general and feel we need to put the break on this expanding practice.

    Having worked in a restaurant when i was younger i still feel there is some merit to tipping your waiter. They are getting paid to provide a basic service: take your order, bring your meal or drinks (in a reasonabe time), clear your plates and provide a bill. Dinning out is still very much about the experience and this is where I believe there is still some merit for the concept of tipping. Although we can cook our own meals at home we often eat out as a break from this daily chore and we enjoy being pampered while at a restaurant. Knowing a tip is at stake is a positive incentive for reastaurant staff to go those extra steps and provide not only the basics but also a positive dinning experience.

    I have slowly watched though as tipping has prevaded into a number of other proffessions where i do not personally see the rationale for this practice, including among others taxi drivers and barbers. Where I have a problem is when i can no longer identify why a tip is required beyond the payment for the service i am already paying for. What part of the taxi service requires a tip in addition to the metre fee,... the feeling that your driver took the shortest route rather than driving the long way to jak up the bill and his/her commission?

    I think tipping is a cyclical trend but one that will never disappear completely. As it gets out of control people will shake their heads and reset the guage aguring that employers should pay their employees appropriately and tipping should not be an expectation. However, it only takes a small group to get the trend started again and so the process begins again.

    I don't think we've seen the worst of it yet in North America but as the existance of this question shows, we are definately a good ways along the path.

  • 1 decade ago

    Just curios has anyone here ever tipped the people that deliver them new furniture or appliances and or your movers, even just a nice cold drink?

    TIPS stands for: To Insure Proper Service if a person does that they get a tip from me.

    I know my post is long but please read the whole thing

    I have only not tipped at a restuarant 2 xs. Once was a highend (Gotham Steakhouse) in Vancouver the place was empty and the service was poor no excuse especially when you are buying everything Ala carte and the Steak alone is $50. I love the service at Mortons each table gets 2 servers and I have no problem leaving them a 20-25% tip

    I used to be in the retaurant industry myself as far as Pizza places are concearned that is one in toughest - lowest profit margin type of restaurant there is try making your own pizza with the same ingrediant and see how much it cost you

    How I tip at bars/restaurants: 10% for fair service if not busy, 15% fair service and busy, 20% good service not busy, 25+% good to excellent service anytime and small greasy spoon places I like to leave a higher % tip

    My barber I give a $2 tip on a $12 cut and he is the owner, I have gone to salon's and paid 2-3 times that then I give 10-15% to the stylist and a couple bucks to the shampoo girl

    I will never base my tip on the taxes, and will never tip for poor service

    I think the 15% unwritten rule is actually derived from AAA or something like that as restaurants that charge a tip on a large group usually tip that and cruises/resorts that have no tip policies usually add that into the cost of some services ie booze ( I know Carnival does). I still tipped on the cruise the people that made my trips a blast as they usually still dont make that much in wages.

    Also if you go on a trip and the cruiseline or resort offers excursions tip your guides, in Jamaica the Martha Brae guides that dont work for the company that does the tours and just get tips. The gov makes it so free agaents can still work the river but you still pay the tour fee and the free agent gets nothing from the operator.

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    I am more then happy to give a 15% tip or more when the service that has been provided is up to the quality that I think it should be. I have worked in a customer service environment for the past 10 years so I might be a little harder to please then the average person. The thing that I don't get is that a waitress who brings your food to the table and that is about it gets a tip but the person working as a cashier or some other form of customer service does not receive anything. I have been in a position many times where I have run around getting information and doing things that are not part of my job just so the customer gets what they need and is happy yet this is not as good as bringing food to a table? Don't get me wrong I know that being a waitress is a hard job but so is being a cashier. Cashiers are generally the face of the company and get all the complaints. They are also responsible to make the customer happy and get any information that a customer requires. I have a deep appreciation for Cashiers and I try to tip when I feel their job is done right. Why don't other people feel the same way... Being in customer service is a hard job whether you are a waitress, cashier, or working in the complaint department. Why do we not see them as equals?

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  • 1 decade ago

    Canadians are not confused about tipping - they know exactly what they are doing - "15% rule" be damned, or so it seems! I had no idea that Canadians were such a cheap bunch.

    Judging by many of the answers already submitted, it appears that most people think workers don't earn or deserve that extra payment for their services - the difference of opinion is also based on what makes the grade of good vs. exceptional service.

    From the article this question stems from, the service that receives the worst tips are food delivery drivers. I'm sorry, but if you can't be bothered to haul your lazy, unable-to-cook-a-decent-meal self into your own kitchen and make a sandwich, you SHOULD be paying someone else extra to be bringing a prepared and hot meal to your doorstep - especially someone driving the streets of a place like Montreal, where it can be considered borderline danger pay.

    The other amount of cheapness on the part of Canadians that I have a difficult time understanding is undertipping someone who is touching your unpleasant feet and performing the miracle of making them less unsightly.

    "People who offer manicures, pedicures, facials and waxing (only 13 per cent of Canadians tip higher than 15 per cent)"

    I pity the stingey woman who thinks it wise to undertip the person giving her a bikini wax - I'd rather invest that extra few bucks into a familiar specialist who is happy to do a waxing job well done. Why take the chance?

    I may not have a lot of money, but the concept of undertipping a person doing a good job (whether the gas station attendant pumping gas for me in -40 degree weather or the Tim Horton's maven serving me a double-double at lunch hour), it just seems wrong. The idea of not tipping or undertipping a worker because you think you're sticking it to the corporation who underpays them really doesn't send a message to the corporation. It doesn't affect the corporation. It just provides less of an income to a worker.

    And that's my two cents...minus tip ;-)

  • 1 decade ago

    I have always been confused about the way we tip. I am more then happy to give a 15% tip or more when the service that has been provided is up to the quality that I think it should be. I have worked in a customer service environment for the past 10 years so I might be a little harder to please then the average person. The thing that I don't get is that a waitress who brings your food to the table and that is about it gets a tip but the person working as a cashier or some other form of customer service does not receive anything. I have been in a position many times where I have run around getting information and doing things that are not part of my job just so the customer gets what they need and is happy yet this is not as good as bringing food to a table? Don't get me wrong I know that being a waitress is a hard job but so is being a cashier. Cashiers are generally the face of the company and get all the complaints. They are also responsible to make the customer happy and get any information that a customer requires. I have a deep appreciation for Cashiers and I try to tip when I feel their job is done right. Why don't other people feel the same way... Being in customer service is a hard job whether you are a waitress, cashier, or working in the complaint department. Why do we not see them as equals?

  • 1 decade ago

    I miss Japan - you don't tip there, like in China. It's insulting to the person as it indicates that you think their normal level of service is so low that the service you got was great, when every customer should be treated the same. Being a foreigner, I expected some poor service sometimes, but I can't remember a single time.

    I came back and found that I was overtipping - something like 30%. For service that was hardly comparable to what I recieved in Japan. So I started tipping less. 10-15% if service was satisfactory, more if the service was fabulous.

    I tip my hairdressers, taxi drivers, and anyone else who does that type of service about 15%. I don't really go to bars, so I don't know what I'd tip on drinks. Probably round up. If the drink is $3.75,$4 or so, I'll leave a $5.

    I also work in the service industry, and although I make minimum wage, I don't get tips, or bonuses, or anything else for my time. I'll help customers for hours, and sometimes the work is physical (moving heavy things around). Usually I get a "thank you", though. I've tried to become a waitress for the reason of making tips and therefore more money, but I haven't had luck thus far (since everywhere wants someone with experience).

    I don't like it when wait staff acts like they deserve 15% tips just because they're wait staff, regardless of the service they gave. Staff who talk really fast, don't smile, aren't friendly... *shakes head*.

    *sighs longingly for the way of Japan again*

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    I consider myself a good tipper when service is good.

    but...

    I used to tip the pizza delivery guy with $5. Now that pizza chain charges for delivery when it used to be free, I take this out of the tip. I know its not the drivers fault, but if the drivers start complaining about their tips going down when service charges went up, the company would listen.

    Another pet peeve I have is the AUTOMATIC 15% tip in the food bill. I took my wife to a restaurant last week where they did this AND they still left a blank spot for you to add in a tip on the bill. That's cheating the patron when some folks haven't read the fineprint or its hidden where the taxes are. That's double tipping!!!

    What about those new credit card machines where they swipe your card right at the table. The waitress stands there watching you key in a tip amount. Talk about confrontation if it isn't enough!

    The most ridiculous I've seen was a tipping cup at the convenience store. The part time clerk probably does this without knowledge from management. How about a smile and "how are you" first before even asking for a tip.

    My tips go to people who have gone above and beyond what satisfactory level of service should be.If you're just doing your job, why do you expect a bonus?

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Typically with the service industry, I pay up to the next $5 dollar mark. For example, if the bill is $21.40, i give them $25, they can keep the change. Seldom do I go out for expensive meals, but if i do, the rule seems to be about $5 per person in the group. Mind you the bill is usually quite a bit with alcohol, and appetizers, lol. If i don't have enough money, I do not leave a tip. When I worked at McDonald's, I never expected a tip. Occasionally I would receive one for doing a great job, and it felt nice. The gratification would have disappeared had it been a common occurrence. I never leave a tip in a fast food place when they have a tip cup set up. I find it insulting. As a waiter, I worked in a very slow restaurant, so if I made $20 in tips a night, it was a great night, rofl. The owners did add a tippage charge for tour groups (more than 30 people) to be split between everyone, kitchen staff included.

  • JuanB
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    Tipping is partially to compensate for low paying jobs of people with little skills or trying to make a buck to improve their situation. Therefore tipping etiquette leaves out business owners and those that learned a skill. That is skilled and trained hairdressers, or hair shop owners. As well potentially, a fair number of taxi drivers are a business. You just don't know. Plus, you tip for service, and usually both of these should be giving your their best service anyhow. This is a one on one service, how can they not give you their normal service? Although, I usually tip (waitresses) and taxi drivers. And I tip taxi drivers even more if they shut up for most of the trip, unless I started a conversation or asked a question.

    As Canadians we are in the middle between cultures where a tip can be an insult verses the American Culture where it is the norm. I find this article insulting with a title suggesting we are wrong, when the survey is pointing out how Canadians feel as a norm.

    Hmm? So to answer your question. Yes, Canadians are confused about tipping. Coming from a background where tipping is an insult because it says we're better than you, and living next to a neighbour where tipping is accepted as generous.

  • D D
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    Much has changed when it comes to tipping. TIPS is actually an acronym for To Insure Prompt Service, and when it first came about it was common that it be paid in advance (think slipping the Maitre'D a few bucks to get a good table).

    As for who I am supposed to tip and who I'm not, well I really don't know (or care) what the rules say.

    I tip my barber, because he does a good job on my hair, and doesn't complain when I don't make it in for a haircut often enough so he ends up taking more time that usual. He will also stay a little late if I call him and ask if he can squeeze me in a closing time.

    I tip taxi drivers, they got me there safely and quickly (and many have to pay for their own gas).

    I tip the pizza delivery person. I used to have a neighbor that didn't tip them and was always complaining that his pizza was cold by the time he got it. I'd order from the same place and it would arrive steaming hot and I'd have to let it cool or I'd burn the roof of my mouth. I was the first stop when the driver left the store, my neighbor was the last. Don't think it's hard to figure out why ...

    When it comes to tipping in restaurants, when I sit down the server is going to get a 15% tip. If the service is bad the tip goes down (sometimes to nothing if its' really bad), if the service is exceptional then the tip goes up.

    I will also tip hotel staff when I stay in one, but other than that I can't think of any other service jobs that I tip for.

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