bpiguy
Lv 7
bpiguy asked in Science & MathematicsGeography · 1 decade ago

What's the difference between Holland and the Netherlands? Why are the people called Dutch? It's confusing.

7 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    ok i read a lot of answers above here, and as a native, i must say, they all have some inacuracies in them. or a lot of them actually. (yes even the copy/paste answer of mr top contributer above here.)

    in short:

    The netherlands is the country, it has been called the netherlands since 1500ish. or well actually it switched through several names, the two most important being:

    - Republiek der zeven verenigden Nederlanden (republik of the seven united netherlands) 1588-1775

    - Koningkrijk der Nederlanden (kingdom of the netherlands) 1830-Present day

    as you can see in the first name, the netherlands comprised of 7 provinces. One of these, by far, the richest, and the most powerful, is Holland. (in the past aswell as today) infact, today, 8 million out of the netherlands 17 million inhabbitants live in holland, which makes up about 1/5th of the country's area.

    3 out of the 5 biggest cities of the netherlands are in holland, including the oficcial and the defacto capital, Amsterdam and The Hague.

    under no condition, in any period of time is Holland ever the correct proper term for the country. its name is The Netherlands.

    as for the term dutch. it has nothing to do with the word Deutch (which means german in german) this is a common misconception. The word Dutch has its origin in english, anno 1500-1700 ish. It means cheap or of bad quality. The english during this time were our rivals. we were one of europes most powerful seafaring countries of that time, we had 6 wars in total with england during those 200 years. (which btw we almost all won) the english despised us for it. and our successes in the far east. They started using slang words for us people, and the dutch is the one that caught on.

    Source(s): Native Dutch guy. this is primary school stuff over here. here is a quote from ditcionary.com on the origins of hte word dutch: Since 1608, Dutch (adj.) has been a "pejorative label pinned by English speakers on almost anything they regard as inferior, irregular, or contrary to 'normal' (i.e., their own) practice" [Rawson]. E.g. Dutch treat (1887), Dutch uncle (1838), etc. -- probably exceeded in such usage only by Indian and Irish -- reflecting first British commercial and military rivalry and later heavy Ger. immigration to U.S.
  • 4 years ago

    Hello, I'm a German and we're not considered to be both Dutch's. You must have heard wrong there - no offense. The language of the Netherlands is considered as today's advancement of a German dialect as English is. I can't remember the source dialect for Dutch but English is today's advancement of a pre-medival German dialect called 'Anglo-Saxxon.' Anyway : German and Dutch are -that- different that I don't understand them at all - most of the time. You can compare the differences of German and Dutch to the difference of ancient Latin and the Italian of today .. ;) In other words : They're very different. Hope I could help ... ;) Best Regards, Michael.

  • Numbat
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    Historical reasons.

    The Netherlands is often called Holland. This is formally incorrect as North and South Holland in the western Netherlands are only two of the country's twelve provinces.

    Dutch refers to the language BUT the Dutch themselves call it Nederlands. The language originates from Middle Dutch (1150AD to 1500AD) which itself originates from Old Dutch (700AD to 1150AD). Dutch was an official language until the end of the 18th century.

    Originally, the Netherlands was much bigger than it is now. At that time it came under Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor. It included present day Belgium, Luxembourg, and parts of France and Germany. After independance, The republic was a confederation of the provinces Holland, Zeeland, Groningen, Friesland, Utrecht, Overijssel and Gelre. The Republic was known as the Republic of the Seven United Netherlands. On January 19, 1795, a day after stadtholder William V of Orange fled to England, the Batavian Republic was proclaimed. From 1795 to 1806, the Batavian Republic designated the Netherlands as a republic modelled after the French Republic.

    The Kingdom of Holland 1806 – 1810 was set up by Napoleon Bonaparte as a puppet kingdom for his third brother, Louis Napoleon Bonaparte, in order to control the Netherlands more effectively. THE NAME OF THE LEADING PROVINCE, HOLLAND, WAS NOW TAKEN FOR THE WHOLE COUNTRY. The kingdom of Holland covered the area of present day Netherlands, with the exception of Limburg, and parts of Zeeland, which were French territory.

    From 1810 to 1813, when Napoleon Bonaparte was defeated in the battle of Leipzig, the Netherlands were part of the French Empire.

    In 1795 the last stadtholder William V of Orange fled to England. His son returned to the Netherlands in 1813 to become William I of the Netherlands, Sovereign Prince of the Netherlands. On March 16, 1815 the Sovereign Prince became King of the Netherlands.

    So it used to be called HOLLAND but is now called the NETHERLANDS (as from 1815).

  • 1 decade ago

    holland and netherlands are the same thing.

    holland is an english- born name, meanwhile dutch people call their country Netherlands, so it's the original name of this state.

    the dutch name is due to the near germany, who reigned for several time in holland and bring there the language.

    nowadays the dutch language is a saxon language

    bye from italy!! ;)

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    They are usually synonymous...technically the term Holland

    is the name of two provinces in the Netherlands , i.e. North Holland and South Holland..

  • 1 decade ago

    THEY ARE ONE AND THE SAME. NETHERLANDS MEANS LOWLANDS AN AT A GUESS I'D SAY THAT AT LEAST 50%OF HOLLAND/NETHERLANDS ARE BELOW SEA LEVEL WITH THE SEA HELD BACK WITH DAMS AND DIKES. THE INHABITANTS ARE CALLED DUTCH BECAUSE THEY SPEAK DUTCH WHICH IS VERY CLOSE TO GERMAN BUT NOT QUITE.THE GERMAN WORD FOR GERMAN IS DEUTCH. SOUNDS LIKE DUTCH HUH?

  • 1 decade ago

    The name Netherlands came from when Spain controlled the area.

    Dutch came from the connection to Germany

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