Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Cars & TransportationAircraft · 1 decade ago

VFR flight requirements?

I live in Saskatchewan, Canada and there is this ignorant SHMIDT that fies over our village in a Cessna 172 at tree top level at least once a week. The nearest airstrip is 30 miles away. I've tried to get the registration off the wing but by the time we hear him coming it's too late to get a good look. What is the minimum altitude when flying over a town or village?

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  • Best Answer

    Stop to consider that perhaps he is flying pipeline patrol

    to ensure YOUR safety. Maybe he is a volunteer flying needed

    blood, or organs for transplant. Could be law enforcement on traffic watch. could be a guy making his living taking photos of aerial views of property, .May be there is a private grass strip that the public(you) are not aware of, and he is going there,,,,could be many things Flying low is not endangering you any more than a airliner at 30,000'

    Your statement by the time we hear him coming its too late to get a good look tells me he is not overhead long, so noise should not be an issue, have a dog barking nearby? he is louder than a C172 at 500 feet, and barks for a lot longer.why are you upset? He also could have a low altitude waiver, if not the following might apply .

    To address your question on what is legal in CANADA ,( the above regards the FAA's rules for the US)

    Permissible Low Altitude Flight

    602.15 (1) A person may operate an aircraft at altitudes and distances less than those specified in subsection 602.14(2) where the aircraft is operated at altitudes and distances that are no less than necessary for the purposes of the operation in which the aircraft is engaged, the aircraft is operated without creating a hazard to persons or property on the surface and the aircraft is operated

    (a) for the purpose of a police operation that is conducted in the service of a police authority;

    (b) for the purpose of saving human life;

    (c) for fire-fighting or air ambulance operations;

    (d) for the purpose of the administration of the Fisheries Act or the Coastal Fisheries Protection Act;

    (e) for the purpose of the administration of the national or provincial parks; or

    (f) for the purpose of flight inspection.

    (2) A person may operate an aircraft, to the extent necessary for the purpose of the operation in which the aircraft is engaged, at altitudes and distances less than those set out in

    (a) paragraph 602.14(2)(a), where operation of the aircraft is authorized under Subpart 3 or section 702.22; or

    (b) paragraph 602.14(2)(b), where the aircraft is operated without creating a hazard to persons or property on the surface and the aircraft is operated for the purpose of

    (i) aerial application or aerial inspection,

    (ii) aerial photography conducted by the holder of an air operator certificate,

    (iii) helicopter external load operations, or

    (iv) flight training conducted by or under the supervision of a qualified flight instructor.

    Minimum Altitudes and Distances

    602.14 (1) [Repealed]

    (amended 2003/03/01; previous version)

    (2) Except where conducting a take-off, approach or landing or where permitted under section 602.15, no person shall operate an aircraft

    (a) over a built-up area or over an open-air assembly of persons unless the aircraft is operated at an altitude from which, in the event of an emergency necessitating an immediate landing, it would be possible to land the aircraft without creating a hazard to persons or property on the surface, and, in any case, at an altitude that is not lower than

    (i) for aeroplanes, 1,000 feet above the highest obstacle located within a horizontal distance of 2,000 feet from the aeroplane,

    (ii) for balloons, 500 feet above the highest obstacle located within a horizontal distance of 500 feet from the balloon, or

    (iii) for an aircraft other than an aeroplane or a balloon, 1,000 feet above the highest obstacle located within a horizontal distance of 500 feet from the aircraft; and

    (b) in circumstances other than those referred to in paragraph (a), at a distance less than 500 feet from any person, vessel, vehicle or structure.

  • 1 decade ago

    In most countries, the minimum altitude above ground for VFR flight is 500 feet over unpopulated areas, or 1,000 feet over populated areas. I don't know the Canadian rules verbatim, but they are very similar to US rules on such matters as this.

    It is a serious infraction, and it doesn't matter whether he/she is buzzing houses or not. It should not be done. If you can't get the number, just a description of the airplane will help the authorities investigate.

    EDIT: As Cherokeeflyer points out, there are numerous exceptions. If one of those exceptions applies, the authorities will determine that. In the USA at least, pipeline and power line patrols are supposed to be conducted from 500 feet AGL. There have been a number of fatalities resulting from these pilots ducking too low.

    Source(s): old pilot
  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Except when necessary for takeoff or

    landing, no person may operate an air-

    craft below the following altitudes:

    (a) Anywhere. An altitude allowing, if

    a power unit fails, an emergency landing without undue hazard to persons or property on the surface.

    (b) Over congested areas. Over any

    congested area of a city, town, or set-

    tlement, or over any open air assembly

    of persons, an altitude of 1,000 feet

    above the highest obstacle within a

    horizontal radius of 2,000 feet of the

    aircraft.

    (c) Over other than congested areas. An

    altitude of 500 feet above the surface,

    except over open water or sparsely populated areas. In those cases, the aircraft may not be operated closer than

    500 feet to any person, vessel, vehicle,

    or structure.

    This is straight from the Federal Aviation Regulations. If he's under 500 feet above the ground, he is breaking the law. Common sense would probably dictate that he wouldn't be able to land safely in the event of an engine failure, as well.

    I'm sorry that there is a pilot out there inconsiderate enough to do that. I apologize on behalf of general aviation pilots everywhere.

    Source(s): Private pilot and FAR part 91.
  • 4 years ago

    You don't have to go anywhere near the planned route of VFR flight. When IFR since you lead turns at most course changes, you might not fly over the fixes listed in that flight plan either.

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  • 1 decade ago

    The answer is that he should be at least 500 feet above the ground. But what I don't understand is why this is a problem. Once a week, assuming it's not ridiculously early in the morning or late at night, I can't imagine what the issue is. Does he circle on area? Is it the noise? A single fly over a week shouldn't be much noisier than a truck going by your street.

  • Fly B
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    kabfighter2 has it bang on. I just want to add in that with an instructor in the right seat, for learning purposes, the plane may go lower than 500 feet above ground level.

    I know some instructors will have the student take the plane into the flare over farmers' fields just prior to a commercial test to make sure they are making the forced approach.

  • 1 decade ago

    Call the FAA (or the Canadian version). They take this kind of violation seriously. They will know exactly what is the minimum flight height.

    Good Luck...

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