Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsAstronomy & Space · 1 decade ago

Space Junk Question?

How come space junk always falls in remote areas? Is it just luck that it never lands on someone's house or on the highway?

Update:

Also, does anyone know how often a piece makes it though the atmosphere?

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    space junk does occaisonally land in populated areas. the reason it doesnt is becuase large sections of the earth are not heavily populated. in addition it can be difficult to find bits of space junk on the roads of a city (it looks just like all the other junk) but its easy to spot in remote areas where is there is no other artifical debris.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Two third of our planet is comprised of oceans and most of the land mass is covered with forests,mountains and other natural factors.Thus the probablity of space junk falling in remote areas is quite rare.Besides most of the space junk doesn't even manage to reach the earth's surface.Because of the air resistance in the atmosphere and great velocity the burn up in the atmosphere itself.

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  • eri
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    The vast majority of the planet is ocean or remote areas. The chances of it landing on a house or highway are actually very small.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Most of the Earth is composed of large bodies of water, wilderness, and rural land. The chances and probabilities of it hitting a home in an urban city are very small or slim, a probability of 1 out of 11 million. But the probability is still there.

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  • 1 decade ago

    It actually falls everywhere-- most of it burns up on re-entry.

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