If space is a vacuum and is composed of nothing?

You can't go through nothingness can you? I mean to say that it took time to travel to the moon but why if there is nothing there?

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Space within our expanding Universe is not a complete vacuum. Space within our Universe contains heat energy at a temperature of 2.745K. Space also contains the matter that we can see, the dark matter that we cannot see and even in deep space where there appears to be nothing you would be able to find an atom of Hydrogen in every square meter of space. So although space appears to be totally empty it is not.

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  • 1 decade ago

    The absence of anything does not preclude the possibility of something. Utter emptiness can be easily penetrated, as there is nothing to resist it.

    Also, it can be argued that the nothingness you are wrestling with is no longer nothingness once something is in it.

    Don't try to consider the properties of nothingness. It's a useless application of intellectual energy. You will get into a knot of convoluted arguments and end up with nothing but anxiety. This is a case where the simple, common sense perception is really the best. Distance does exist whether there is anything in it or not. All there has to be is something at both ends.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Yes, things go through nothingness all the time. (Electrons in a cathode ray tube monitor come to mind).

    It takes time because there is significant distance involved (400,000 km, about) and we've not made many machines that can go much over 40,000 km/hour carrying significant payloads.

    To leave the earth and go to the moon, a spacecraft has to be accelerated to about 40,000 km/hr (25,000 mi/hr) but over time it will slow down (the spacecraft engines only operate for a brief period at the beginning of the flight, and then other short times during it.

    Anyway, it takes a couple days to reach the moon, and a couple days to come back. Life support for three men for over a week was needed for Apollo flights back in 1969-1971. That, the men, and all counts as a "significant payload" in my book.

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  • Kes
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    If you drop an object in a tube filled with a vacuum it still takes time to fall even though there is nothing in the tube. A feather and a coin will fall at the same rate because there is no air resistance.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It is just space - an almost empty volume. You just have a few atoms per cubic meter.

    This does not hinder travel - contrary: It makes it easier as you have practically no friction at all. You just need to give something a push (by using rocket engines) and this object will travel on, only affected by gravity.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Since space is a vacuum it would stop you so you would have to be propelled through it and that would take time. Also the theory of dark matter could explain that, but no proof of dark matter exists, other than the question: What holds our universe together?

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  • 1 decade ago

    Think of it as a vacuum (as you said), dust is being pulled into a mass of gas and dust, the universe's composition, there is matter and gravity throughout the universe

    Source(s): Science class last year
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It's space. It has dimensions, like the space inside a box.

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  • 1 decade ago

    even if there's no matter in it, space itself is not nothing. there's a sea of virtual particles, maybe a higgs field or two, it warps, it stretches, and it always has the potential to accomodate matter. doesn't sound like nothing to me.

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  • Adam
    Lv 6
    1 decade ago

    I understand your confusion. There are places where there is *nothing*. It's a bit strange being where there is nothing, unlike here on Earth where you are always surrounded by air.

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