For what crimes do people get the death penalty?

What crimes do you have to commit to be sentenced to the death penalty and how much do different countries vary with the severity of your crime. Also, what places do they still have the death penalty.

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Almond gave a great answer. Internationally,

    most nations have abolished the death penalty. 135 nations are abolitionist by law or practice while 91 nations retain it. The leaders in numbers of executions over the last couple of years are China, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, the United States and Sudan. The best source on this part of your question is http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/death-penalty-inte...

    Nationally, 36 states have the death penalty but very few execute anyone.

    The 36 states are:

    Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado,

    Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana,

    Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland,

    Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada,

    New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio,

    Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina,

    South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia,

    Washington, Wyoming

    In 2006-7, most states carried out no more than 1 execution:

    Alabama 4, Arizona 1, California 1, Florida 4, Georgia 1, Indiana 3, Mississippi 1,Montana 1, North Carolina 4, Nevada 1, Ohio 7, Oklahoma 7, South Carolina 2, South Dakota 1, Tennessee 3, Texas 50, Virginia 4.

    The other 33 states carried out no executions at all.

    Source: www.deathpenaltyinfo.org

    Look at Execution database, State by State and at International pages

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  • 4 years ago

    1

    Source(s): Criminal Records Search Database - http://CriminalRecords.raiwi.com/?tjKR
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  • 1 decade ago

    You know there are people on death row that didn't commit any crime what so ever, our judicial system needs some work.

    In fact we have the highest prison population of any country, maybe the system needs a whole lotta work.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Serial killer.. like jack the ripper!

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    premeditated murder

    murder of a child

    Here are some more:

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  • julz
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    Don't forget treason.

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  • Almond
    Lv 5
    1 decade ago

    Alabama. Intentional murder with 18 aggravating factors (Ala. Stat. Ann. 13A-5-40(a)(1)-(18)).

    Arizona. First-degree murder accompanied by at least 1 of 14 aggravating factors (A.R.S 13-703(F)).

    Arkansas. Capital murder (Ark. Code Ann. 5-10-101) with a finding of at least 1 of 10 aggravating circumstances; treason.

    California. First-degree murder with special circumstances; train wrecking; treason; perjury causing execution.

    Colorado. First-degree murder with at least 1 of 17 aggravating factors; treason.

    Connecticut. Capital felony with 8 forms of aggravated homicide (C.G.S. 53a-54b).

    Delaware. First-degree murder with at least 1 aggravating circumstances.

    Florida. First-degree murder; felony murder; capital drug trafficking; capital sexual battery.

    Georgia. Murder; kidnaping with bodily injury or ransom when the victim dies; aircraft hijacking; treason.

    Idaho. First-degree murder with aggravating factors; aggravated kidnapping, perjury resulting in death.

    Illinois. First-degree murder with 1 of 21 aggravating circumstances.

    Indiana. Murder with 16 aggravating circumstances (IC 35-50-2-9).

    Kansas. Capital murder with 8 aggravating circumstances (KSA 21-3439, KSA 21-4625).

    Kentucky. Murder with aggravating factors; kidnapping with aggravating factors (KRS 32.025).

    Louisiana. First-degree murder; aggravated rape of victim under age 13; treason (La. R.S. 14:30, 14:42, and 14:113).

    Revision: Revised the definition of aggravated rape as a capital-eligible offense to include any offense involving victims under age 13. (2006 La. Sess. Law, Act 178), effective 8/15/2006.

    Maryland. First-degree murder, either premeditated or during the commission of a felony, provided that certain death eligibility requirements are satisfied.

    Mississippi. Capital murder (97-3-19(2) MCA); aircraft piracy (97-25-55(1) MCA).

    Missouri. First-degree murder (565.020 RSMO 2000).

    Montana. Capital murder with 1 of 9 aggravating circumstances (Mont. Code Ann. § 46-18-303); aggravated sexual intercourse without consent (Mont. Code Ann. § 45-5-503).

    Nebraska. First-degree murder with a finding of at least 1 statutorily-defined aggravating circumstance.

    Nevada. First-degree murder with at least 1 of 15 aggravating circumstances (NRS 200.030, 200.033, 200.035).

    New Hampshire. Six categories of capital murder (RSA 630:1, RSA 630:5).

    Revision: Amended the capital statute to increase the minimum age of eligibility for a death sentence from 17 to 18 years at the time the offense was committed (N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. 630:1,V), effective 1/1/2006.

    New Jersey. Murder by one's own conduct, by solicitation, committed in furtherance of a narcotics conspiracy, or during the commission of the crime of terrorism (NJSA 2C:11-3C). NOTE: On December 17, 2007, the New Jersey death penalty was abolished.

    New Mexico. First-degree murder with at least 1 of 7 statutorily-defined aggravating circumstances (Section 30-2-1 A, NMSA).

    New York. First-degree murder with 1 of 13 aggravating factors (NY Penal Law Sec. 125.27). NOTE: On June 24, 2004, the New York death penalty statute was ruled unconstitutional.

    North Carolina. First-degree murder (NCGS 14-17).

    Ohio. Aggravated murder with at least 1 of 10 aggravating circumstances (O.R.C. secs. 2903.01, 2929.02, and 2929.04).

    Oklahoma. First-degree murder in conjunction with a finding of at least 1 of 8 statutorily-defined aggravating circumstances; sex crimes against a child under 14 years of age.

    Revision: Added as a capital offense sex crimes against a child under 14 years of age when the offender has a previous conviction for a similar offense (Okla. Stat. Ann. 10 § 7115), effective 7/1/2006.

    Oregon. Aggravated murder (ORS 163.095).

    Pennsylvania. First-degree murder with 18 aggravating circumstances.

    South Carolina. Murder with 1 of 12 aggravating circumstances (§ 16-3-20(C)(a)); criminal sexual conduct with a minor with 1 of 9 aggravators (§ 16-3-655).

    Revision: Added as a capital offense second and subsequent offenses of first-degree criminal sexual conduct with a minor who is less than 11 years of age (§16-3-655). Lawmakers also added as an aggravating factor murder committed by a person deemed a sexually violent predator under South Carolina law (§16-3-20(C)(a)(12). Both changes were effective 7/1/2006.

    South Dakota. First-degree murder with 1 of 10 aggravating circumstances.

    Revision:Amended the definition of aggravated kidnapping to eliminate death as a possible sentence (SDCL 22-19-1), effective 7/1/2006.

    Tennessee. First-degree murder with 1 of 15 aggravating circumstances (Tenn. Code Ann. Sec. 39-13-204).

    Texas. Criminal homicide with 1 of 9 aggravating circumstances (TX Penal Code 19.03).

    Utah. Aggravated murder (76-5-202, Utah Code Annotated).

    Virginia. First-degree murder with 1 of 13 aggravating circumstances (VA Code 18.2-31).

    Washington. Aggravated

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