LJ asked in TravelCanadaVancouver · 1 decade ago

Living in Vancouver (compared to Lisbon)?

Hi, Canadians. =) I've been doing some research on prices in Vancouver, especially house prices, because I would like to immigrate from Lisbon, the capital of Portugal. Now of course buying a home is not how I plan to start my life there, I haven't won the lottery yet... But in the long term, I'm considering all of my options, depending on how my career goes. But for now, I need to think in practical terms and decide whether I can establish myself economically. I hope you can help me figure this out.

Fact number 1: we use the Euro in Portugal. Accordingly:

C$1 = €0.63

€1 = C$1.59

Fact number 2: the current monthly minimum wage in Portugal is €426 (C$677), while in Vancouver it's almost double. It has been said some time ago that it might go up to €450. What can I say? We are hardly a rich country.

Fact number 3: here, we generally consider taxes to be heavy and wages to be objectionable, since we note that we always have enough money to last us for at least a month but it's very hard to make real savings. We pay a 21% tax (called IVA) on basically everything we buy. Like I said, this is hardly a country of the rich.

Fact number 4: as examples, here are the prices of some basic stuff. (I hope these values are accurate.)

- 1kg of bread = 3.75€ (based on a 40g bun at €0.15)

- 1l of water = €0.40 (average)

- 1kWh of electricity = €0.1011

Fact number 5: the cost of the middle-class apartment me and my family are living in (and still paying for, of course) is €175K. That's C$278K. It's an OK home - but really just OK, I think, and not in a very friendly part of town either. Normal rents seem to usually range between €500 and €800 - already well above the minimum wage. And that basically means that with the job I have now, all of my full-time salary would go to the rent; good thing I don't live alone.

Fact number 6: The two most expensive luxury homes that I could find in Lisbon cost a whopping six million Euros (C$9.5M) and 5.5 million Euros, while I expect the cheapest luxury homes to be around €300K and the average around €1M. These two values are just guesses, though.

I consider life in my own country to be slow, tiresome and very expensive, under these conditions. Suffocatingly expensive. Even though it's actually improving massively from the way it was 40 years ago. But that's another story.

My questions: how does all this compare to Vancouver? And in the short term, what kind of monthly expenses, including taxes, am I to expect if I earn at least C$1920 per month (that's C$23,040 per year, before tax deductions), renting a simple room with shared bathroom and kitchen at around C$400?

I already know that my salary will go to:

- room rent (C$400);

- taxes (if it's 20%, then it's almost another C$400);

- public transportation fees;

- electricity (just for the lights and the computer);

- food and water (that's decently feeding myself; neither starving, nor going to a fancy restaurant every day);

- all other everyday stuff such as clothes and hygiene products.

How much money will I have left at the end of each month? Will it at least be enough? Or will I fall short instead?

Thanks for your attention. (Please, detailed answers.)

4 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    My questions: how does all this compare to Vancouver? And in the short term, what kind of monthly expenses, including taxes, am I to expect if I earn at least C$1920 per month (that's C$23,040 per year, before tax deductions), renting a simple room with shared bathroom and kitchen at around C$400?

    You will be hard pressed to find shared accomodation at this rate. you can find it, but it is hard.

    I already know that my salary will go to:

    - room rent (C$400);

    - taxes (if it's 20%, then it's almost another C$400);

    There is 12% tax on goods and services

    - public transportation fees; the buses and skytrain have 3 zones depending on how far you go. Costs $2.50 to $5.00

    - electricity (just for the lights and the computer); probably included with the room price.

    - food and water (that's decently feeding myself; neither starving, nor going to a fancy restaurant every day); You can eat for $10 a day or less with out going to a restaurant. Restaurant meals for breakfast or lunch will cost between $7-10. Suppers cost $15-20. If you eat at Tim Hortons, thats the cheapest

    - all other everyday stuff such as clothes and hygiene products. Walmart is the cheap place, but they are a distance away

    How much money will I have left at the end of each month? Will it at least be enough? Or will I fall short instead? With the amound of money you are looking at earning, you will have no money left

    Thanks for your attention. (Please, detailed answers.)

    Source(s): I live here
  • 3 years ago

    Lisbon is Europe's second-oldest capital and when house to the world's best explorers like Vasco da Gama, Magellan and Prince Henry the Navigator, getting the very first true earth town, the capital of an empire scattering total continents, from South America (Brazil) to Asia (Macao, China; Goa, India) and know you can spend a couple of time to know this historical town, with hotelbye is wherever you must start. The most acknowledged of Lisbon's key attractions is the St. George's Castle. That fort commands a glorious place near Alfama on the crown of a mountain overlooking the Portuguese capital. This really is among Lisbon's most popular tourist destinations. Their amazing battlements, interesting museum, and intriguing archaeological site mix to help make the castle a gratifying knowledge for all the family, and young ones specially will like clambering on the strong walls and systems that encircle the grounds.

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    You forgot to add cell phone bill. I pay about $56 monthly.

    I agree with the above poster about room $400CAD....difficult to find. Vancouver has the highest housing costs in Canada and one of the highest in North America and in the world. I know people who live with other roommates and they work 2 jobs to get by. I know people who moved to Vancouver and then come back after 2-3 years because it was just too expensive and they knew would not be able to own a home and car. British Columbia is a beautiful place but so damn expensive. Good luck.

    Source(s): I live in Canada
  • 3 years ago

    With its extensive areas and fairly equable climate keeping conditions mild throughout every season, Vancouver is really a heaven and today, you have the chance to discover it with hotelbye . Vancouver is features a busy cultural life. Among the areas worth visited in Vancouver is Granville Island. After primarily professional, Granville Island is now a successful hub of activity with a relaxed and exclusive atmosphere. Artists and merchants have transferred into modified warehouses alongside houseboats, cinemas, galleries, and restaurants. The Granville Island Public Market is certainly one of the most used attractions selling fruit and veggies, seafood, and a good variety of other specialties in addition to ready-to-eat items. Not really an area, the arts centre is associated with residential parts by one road and footbridges to the south, and to the Downtown peninsula (across Fake Creek) by ferry.

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