Anonymous
Anonymous asked in HealthOther - Health · 1 decade ago

service dog i need more info on this?

Dear Online Community,

I have recently delpoed a serious medical condition, i black out, i am in a wheel chair tube feed ect.

I live in BC Canada, i have a dog for two years she is a Golden retiver, she is my dog extreamly well behavide, smart and loyal.

i want her to be my service dog. i am only 15. how do i do this? will someone esle train her because i can't? Is there anacademy for this? what do i have to do? please give me websites your story if you have//had a service dog , names and phone numbers for people who can help. how do i get her certifed? Any information helps. i need this please help. thank you

sorry for the speeling i am also dylexic

thank you

2 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Start by making yourself a list of the things you cannot do because of your disability that you need to be able to do to live. Put your list in order with the thing that most hinders your daily life activities at the top of that list. Now start a second column and ask yourself what an assistant could do to help you overcome that barrier to independent living. Finally, ask yourself whether these tasks are something a dog might be able to do with training.

    You'll need this worksheet as a starting point when talking to trainers about helping you to train your dog. There really aren't good places to send a dog off for service dog training unless you get wildly lucky with a specialist private trainer. I know of no programs that will accept a clients dog for training. They train only the dogs they select.

    So that leaves you with one real option if your heart is set on this dog even if it means you don't get a service dog because it turns out she isn't able. You have to be prepared for that possibility because the vast majority of dogs, even of lovely, sweet tempered dogs, are not going to have all the pieces needed to be full service dogs. It doesn't make them less any more than being disabled makes a person less. It just means their strengths lie elsewhere and that they should do what they do best.

    That one option is to hire a private trainer to work with you in training your dog. You should arrange to see the trainer at least once a week and spend the time in between working hard on the exercises the trainer recommends. Since you are physically challenged with training, I strongly recommend you find a trainer to work with who specializes in clicker training. It is possible for a person to train a dog using clicker methods even if they are not able to use their arms or legs, if they are determined enough to master the skills.

    Look for the OC-Assist-Dogs list on YahooGroups. They may be able to help you find such a trainer. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/oc-assist-dogs/

    If you are willing to consider having a different dog be your service dog, your chances of success will improve. You can use this webpage to help you look for a service dog program: http://servicedogcentral.org/content/node/262

  • 5 years ago

    Find what motivates your dog. Some dogs do anything for food. Some dogs do anything for Toys. Some do anything for a good petting. Some do anything for only one type of food, like cheese, or hotdog. Some only have interest in training for 5 minutes at a time, and others can go for an hour. Figure out what your dog is willing to work for, and then work with her in sessions that are no longer than she can tolerate. How to train your dog properly https://tr.im/Vj6Qt

    Sign up for a dog obedience training class. It will not train your dog. It will give you training on how you can train your dog. Most people understand the idea of training, but there is a right and a wrong way to do it, and there is good and bad technique. Timing and consistency is very important, and it helps to have feedback of someone watching you who can help you improve your technique to get more efficient results with your dog.

    However, she may be somewhat anxious around other dogs, sort of like the shy kid on the playground. She will benefit from continuing what you are doing as far as asking her to sit before entering, but there are more things along those lines that will help her to calmly go in and out of the dog park. She may also benefit from going in short bursts, or only when fewer dogs are present, or avoiding times when other dogs that make her nervous are present. Maybe she just plays loud - my brother's dog is this way - or maybe she is a dogpark bully - sorry it is possible. But more likely she is just a little anxious around new dogs and she wants to play but just doesn't quite know how to do that and still feel comfortable. Don't be surprised if your dog does not actually like the dog park, and maybe she would get more enjoyment and less stress out of simply going for a good walk somewhere else.

    A wagging tail does not mean that your dog is happy or even comfortable with the situation. It means your dog is emotionally aroused. This could be a happy arousal, or it could be a nervous arousal, or it could be an aggressive arousal. Go youtube it, there are plenty of videos of 'vicious' dogs who are throwing a very aggressive fit of barking and snarling while their tail is wagging vigorously. Even police dogs who are not let off the leash to chase down a suspect can be lunging and barking and snarling, and their tails are still going.

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.