Work in public sector or private sector?

Currently I am working in a government agency and my co-workers are telling me I am young I should work outside the government because that's where the money is and plus you promote faster. I am 24 years old, I always wanted to work in the government because I like to serve the public so I feel I am doing something that helps people and have a factor in making decisions that will affect the entire state/province. For money, I just need money to buy a place to live other than that I don't really seem to need money at all since I prefer taking the public transit than driving. I am more concern about the promotion aspect. I planned to study master's part time (hoping the government agency will pay for it) so hopefully that might help me with promotion. I just need to be a manager other than that I don't really have much expectations in life. I want to have time to take courses in school so I can upgrade myself.

Update:

The problem seems that the things I specialize inside and the computer software I use will not be used outside. Well at my current department that is. I have planned to become an Analyst (business analyst, policy analyst or statistical analyst) but since I work in the Alcohol and Gaming Commission so I will focus in the states Alcohol and Gaming businesses I will pretty much remain in the these area.

Update 2:

Note: I only started working in this place for 2 months. So I still don't know what it is like to work in the public service.

2 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Best Answer

    Public sector is more stable, period. You have better benefits and you can promote from within. Furthermore, say you work for DOJ. You work in California. Your mom and dad retire to Maryland. You can transfer to Washington DC to be close to your folks. You don't lose your tenure, either.

    You can also switch from one agency to the next. I switched from one agency to another and I was given preference over other applicants because of my years of service already provided.

    Furthermore, private sector is fickle. You will work your butt off, and the slacker who sits next to you will get promoted. You know, the guy who's job you're always doing 'cause he's goofing off?

    You are a girl much like me. If you prefer helping people and working in the public sector, you will NOT be happy in the private sector. I took the advice of people who told me what people are telling you and I was sorry for it.

    The fact is you don't make more money. If you're lucky to find a job that actually pays more, great, but they generally don't. Private companies are also subject to the whims of the stock market, if they're public companies, and that puts you in danger for layoffs, etc.

    Unemployment is 9.7%, the highest in 26 years. Do NOT leave your job. In fact, why don't you get me one? I'd love to come back :-)

  • 1 decade ago

    I worked in the public sector for 9 years in the 90s. Finally I had to quit because ni matter what I did there would never be the resources to do the job right. And nothing I could do made any lasting impact on anyone. I was just a replaceable cog in the machine as an engineer I was getting too depressed.

    I packed up, moved from Vancouver to LA and been working in private industry and making a difference now to people's lives all around the world. No regrets in getting out. Even the loss of the pension.

  • 1 decade ago

    public sector is more reliable. yes you could make more money in the private sector but some dont offer benifets like the public sector. you should look for jobs in your skills and see if anything is open with higher pay and good benifets. good luck

  • 1 decade ago

    i say do the best you can to get the promotion. maybe talk to a few people about moving up. its hard sometimes to get people to notice when you are doing a good job some jerks take it for granted. or use it to make themselves look good. i say if they don't give you the credit you deserve then its time to leave.

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