ESL ENGLISH seeking for help on my vocab thanks! scoff?

Does scoff mean the same as jeered and laughed?

the audience scoffed at the magician for making a silly mistake during his performance.

Does this sentence make sense, any way of improvement?

Thanks in advance!

6 Answers

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  • Bert H
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    scoff -

    verb (used without object)

    1. to speak derisively; mock; jeer (often fol. by at): If you can't do any better, don't scoff. Their efforts toward a peaceful settlement are not to be scoffed at.

    –verb (used with object)

    2. to mock at; deride.

    –noun

    3. an expression of mockery, derision, doubt, or derisive scorn; jeer.

    4. an object of mockery or derision.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Origin:

    1300–50; ME scof; orig. uncert., but cf. ON skopa to scorn

    Related forms:

    scoffer, noun

    scoff⋅ing⋅ly, adverb

    Synonyms:

    1. gibe. Scoff, jeer, sneer imply behaving with scornful disapproval toward someone or about something. To scoff is to express insolent doubt or derision, openly and emphatically: to scoff at a new invention. To jeer suggests expressing disapproval and scorn more loudly, coarsely, and unintelligently than in scoffing: The crowd jeered when the batter struck out. To sneer is to show by facial expression or tone of voice ill-natured contempt or disparagement: He sneered unpleasantly in referring to his opponent's misfortunes.

    Antonyms:

    3. praise.

    Your sentence is fine.

    If you wanted to make it more vocal, use jeered.

    The audience jeered at the magician for making a silly mistake during his performance by saying rude statements and guffaws.

    ;-)

    Source(s): Published author.
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  • 1 decade ago

    Yes 'scoff' has a similar meaning to 'jeer' and 'laugh'.

    That sentence makes perfect sense.

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  • 1 decade ago

    No, scoff at someone means to rebuff someone, to rebuke them with a demeaning air

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  • Rose
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    You are so complacent that we are giving you the answers to your homework. We obliquely gave the seventh grader vocabulary sentences for her homework. Girls that get help from Answers for their homework will be discontent when they get a bad grade from their teacher because she found out that the student cheated.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Yes, it does. The example is fine.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    an alternative would be to ridicule

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