Is it acceptable for my ex-boss to be contacting me every couple of months asking me about work I did for her?

I left a research position in the summer and she keeps contacting me every couple of months to ask about some of the research I did.

Now, when I worked there, I was fairly new and no one was really guiding me and I kinda got dumped with a big project. Turns out I made some mistakes, which I fully recognize, but I really believe that part of it was the lack of oversight on her part.

Anyway, she's been really passive aggressive in her emails (making me feel like total crap but still saying all the right words) and is questioning me about various aspects of the work.

I instantly get anxious when I see her name pop up and I feel terribly.

My question is though, is this appropriate for her to be doing this? I'm a really nice person so always respond but I'm starting to wonder if this is crossing a line.

What are your thoughts?

8 Answers

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  • 1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    There are good bosses and bad bosses - your ex-boss doesn't strike me as being very good at people management, nor exercising the proper type and level of control.

    This person would have responsibility for assigning a group of tasks to you, and access to relevant resources? Since you were new to the project, I would further assume these would have been reasonably minor tasks - taken perhaps as a measure of your ability to follow instruction and work on your own initiative. She would have responsibility for keeping close tabs on you, and taking corrective action wherever you went astray. What happened?

    Normally, I'd recommend that you maintain good relations with this person, but she sounds to have been promoted to her own level of incompetence. From the small amount that you have said about her, this person is someone to be avoided.

    You have been nice for far too long here. STOP it!

    If this person again asks you again what you did, create a one-page summary of your duties and tasks undertaken and instructions followed (No more than 400 words). Send it to her by registered post, at the research plant she works at. (This will test if she is still actually working there.)

    This document represents your final-word on the matter of your duties, working under the instruction and guidance of this woman. You consider any further correspondence would be intrusive and intimidatory.

    The matter should now be considered closed.

    Make certain you send a copy of this document to the CEO (by name) of the company. Remember - this woman may do this to several ex-staff members. Leave it up to the company to discover why (if they want to).

    Further correspondence could be interpreted as harassment, and may be handed to a lawyer, if you should choose to engage one.

    Be sure to move on to something better.

    Good luck

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  • 1 decade ago

    When I first read your question, I immediately thought "No way. Your ex-boss shouldn't make you continue doing your work after you have left and are no longer paid." However, in this specific circumstance, it's understandable. It would be very helpful for her to just ask you some questions and fix the mistakes (understand your thinking process) instead of having to re-do the whole thing herself! It is also not your obligation to respond if you really don't want to since you don't work there anymore.

    But it might be a good idea to help her out a bit for a little longer. You never know when you might need her recommendation or as a reference for future jobs! Keep on good terms at all cost even if she is overstepping her boundaries a bit.

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  • 1 decade ago

    I would not consider this to be acceptable, even if you hypothetically ruined the entire system once you no longer worked there you should not be contacted to help with work. However if I personally made a mistake I would attempt to fix it, but to a limit, after months of her contacting you (especially if she's aggressive) it needs to end. I would tell her that you are too busy to handle your current responsibilities plus your old ones, so any questions she has need to be asked in one final email or call when you will give her any information you can, and after that it needs to end. As long as you are polite and respectful, it will not be a rude thing to tell her not to contact you anymore.

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    Just tell her in your own words that you don't work there any more and you don't want to talk about your old job. If she wants to know you should be sitting in her office as her employee having that conversation. It's not your business anymore.

    I still try to help my old employers, but none of them were buttholes to me either. If they were, I'd tell them I don't want to discuss confidential research projects over a public email server, and that I don't work there anymore. Face. lol

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  • Rick B
    Lv 7
    1 decade ago

    No. You need to tell her that you appreciate her interest in your work, but you simply don't have the time to talk about work that happened several months ago. Tell her that you are sorry, but you have to go. Then hang up.

    It is not rude, just direct.

    Good luck.

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  • 1 decade ago

    Not really

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  • 1 decade ago

    if your getting paid then yes . if not then tell her/ him to **** off and solve it her/himself . its not ur problem anymore :D

    Source(s): myself cause im awesome
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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    no, no and no.

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