how much weight does the earth gain each year?

From people, buildings, vehicles, meteorites, etc. Or does it not gain any weight at all considering it's on a fixed orbit?

8 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    10 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    The earth is a closed system and as such does not gain or lose any weight. However, around 1000 tons of space dust falls to earth every year, and when shuttles or satellites are launched, technically the earth is losing some weight from it. But this is negligible and as such should be disregarded. The most weight the earth has ever lost is when the moon was formed by a collision with another proto-planet.

  • 10 years ago

    If the earth isn't gaining weight; I suppose its must be like a balloon being filled with air that will eventually burst! Perhaps all of you should stop looking up to solve this question. Meaning if you look down, you will find some other ways of thinking to solve this question. The sun shines and plants grow. The plants die and the soil amount increases. To further exaggerate the huge amount of weight being gained; take a long look at any excavation in which will reflect multitudes of layers of earth dating back 100's of thousands or further years earlier in time. So if mass is not being increased and only being used by already existing sources, where is the source of this mass? So I believe the earth is gaining mass and is getting bigger each year and I fail to believe this mass is coming from a source already present. So in the future, first look within your spirit which is lead by a higher power and not question but let yourself be guided by one that knows all and you will be overwhelmed by so much insight, you may in fact burst yourself.

  • Liz
    Lv 7
    10 years ago

    No weight from stuff that's here being turned in to other stuff that's here. So things like people, and buildings and vehicles.. Those are just transformations of things like carbon, metals, and other dirt that was already here.

    Now.. meteorites.. that's another story. We get a BUNCH of those every year.

    About 50,000 TONS of meteorites a year.. or so.

    Atmospheric escape counters this to a degree, but on the whole, the Earth adds about one quadrillionth of one percent to its overall mass every day.

  • quasar
    Lv 5
    10 years ago

    It doesn't gain weight. Weight is the measure of the mass of a certain body when subjected to the force of gravity.

    The Earth mass, however, is equal to 5.9742 × 10^24 kilograms. This mass doesn't change in the general sense of the meaning. All of what you mentioned above, except meteorites, don't add to the Earth's mass because they are simply part of this mass. All the materials needed in manufacturing these things come from Earth, even us as humans and other living things get our energy/nutrients from Earth. Earth in this perspective is a huge recycling factory.

    Now meteorites does add to the Earth mass, but their additional value is negligible considering Earth's size. Nonetheless, there is a certain value being added by meteorites.

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  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    It doesn't gain any weight. People die when people are born, too. Buildings and vehicles come from materials on earth. Meteorite impacts are not common or significant enough to make the earth gain any weight.

  • 10 years ago

    It does gain weight from meteorites entering the atmosphere and it loses on space shuttles leaving earth.none weight gains from population increase or buildings ,but loses since we spend the food mass in chemical and than mechanical energy

    Source(s): sorry abt misspellings wrote on cell no auto correct herf
  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    i dont think it can gain any more weight because if u take clay and make a pot it still weighs the same the earth question gets the same answer but on a bigger scale

  • 10 years ago

    The Earth weighs around 6,600,000,000,000,000,000,000 tons and it gets 100 tons heavier every day due to falling space dust.

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