Shonda asked in Arts & HumanitiesGenealogy · 10 years ago

Was the last name Benjamin a common one for slavemasters in South Carolina?

I am trying to find out about slavemasters with the last name of Benjamin in South Carolina. Were there Jewish slave masters?

4 Answers

Relevance
  • Anonymous
    10 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    There are three slave OWNERS in South Carolina with that last name in 1860.

    Age Gender Race Name of Slave Owner Home in 1860 (City,County,State)

    40 Female Black H G Benjamin Charleston City Ward 4, Charleston, South Carolina

    36 Female Black H G Benjamin Charleston City Ward 4, Charleston, South Carolina

    17 Female Black H G Benjamin Charleston City Ward 4, Charleston, South Carolina

    17 Female Black H G Benjamin Charleston City Ward 4, Charleston, South Carolina

    8 Female Black H G Benjamin Charleston City Ward 4, Charleston, South Carolina

    4 Male Black H G Benjamin Charleston City Ward 4, Charleston, South Carolina

    3 Female Black H G Benjamin Charleston City Ward 4, Charleston, South Carolina

    2 Female Black H G Benjamin Charleston City Ward 4, Charleston, South Carolina

    60 Male Black John Benjamin Laurens, South Carolina

    45 Female Black John Benjamin Laurens, South Carolina

    38 Male Black John Benjamin Laurens, South Carolina

    25 Female Black John Benjamin Laurens, South Carolina

    20 Male Black John Benjamin Laurens, South Carolina

    16 Male Black John Benjamin Laurens, South Carolina

    8 Male Black John Benjamin Laurens, South Carolina

    4 Female Black John Benjamin Laurens, South Carolina

    2 Male Black John Benjamin Laurens, South Carolina

    45 Female Black M Benjamin Laurens, South Carolina

    Slave "Master" sounds like an overseer.

    It looks to me like H G was running a bordello and sold the boys as soon as they were old enough to work - age 8 or so, I'd guess. He'd keep the girls and use them, probably. John there has a plantation, and M has a housekeeper.

    No US census or slave schedule asked religion.

  • 10 years ago

    how about being more exact?

    use www.familysearch.org, the surname Benjamin, and place is South Carolina. When the results come up, filter to census...then to 1850.

    The result is 42 persons in the census named Benjamin. Some are in Louisiana. Several of those are wives/ children.

    It narrows it down. For example, you can pull up the census image for a John Benjamin with his wife Anna and two children. His occupation is farmer, and his property value is $700. Was that land or slaves? It does not indicate on this, but there are such things as slave schedules. If he died and left a probate file (will or otherwise), you could find out. You also could search through the deed records in a county.

    I have a hunch that maybe oral history in your family says so-and-so (wife?) came from a wealthy plantation owner and/or slavemaster father. If that is the situation, my advice is that you are putting the cart before the horse. Find documents re your person in the census, for example, and look for the NAME of the parent. It often is possible that you will find the person as a child living with the parent (depending on the year). When you have a verified name, you then can look for applicable documents to support or rule out the family story.

    None of the census records will show religion. I don't know if you perhaps have heard that Benjamin "is a Jewish name".. if so, that would be an assumption and probably incorrect. Otherwise, records will often reflect if oral history is accurate. On the outside chance that the person was prominent, he MIGHT show up in a county history with a biography, that occasionally mentions a person to be a devoted Methodist, a staunch Republican, etc.

    If my hunch is correct on your goal.. try reposting a question with name of the child, details of time frame and location...then let us hungry researchers take a bite out of it.

  • It is better to seek one particular family, or one person, with the surname of Benjamin.

    Yes, there were Jews who owned slaves, and people who made the Jew a slave.

    Since you mentioned South Carolina, you will find that the Cherokee also owned slaves. That's why Andrew Jackson had them rounded up and forced on the Trail of Tears, because the Cherokee was acting like the whites.

    Every person alive on earth has had royalty in their ancestry; everyone has had slaves in their ancestry.

    If you have a particular location, and a particular time period, you can check newpaper archives, historical/genealogical societies, and, since it is in the South, check the Virginia State Library and the one in Alabama, as well as the Library of Congress archives.

    Source(s): life; genalogical research
  • eames
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    As of 2009, the call Benjamin became extensive type 20 on the stunning a hundred record of maximum accepted infant names in accordance to the Social protection administration internet site. might I advise Bennett, Benedict or Benson? Colton, on the different hand, became in basic terms the ninetieth maximum accepted call in 2009. for my section, i think of Benjamin Colton or Colton Benjamin are extremely long names to be precise after one yet another, and the two end with an "en" sound which makes it slightly atypical to the ear. basically IMO tho. consistent with possibility Benjamin Colt extremely?

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.