Question About Pilot Licensing.?

Since I live in Canada I have the option of getting a recreational pilot permit. I've been considering getting one because it is considerably cheaper than a PPL but I'm not 100% sure on what the allows me to do. I know I can fly a lightweight single engine prop with no more than 4 seats but can only take one passenger and I'm restricted to day time VFR flight. If I got a RPP would I be able to go too, say Qualicum Beach for dinner and back (from Vancouver)? And when does "daytime" end acourding to the FAA and what would only having VFR restrict me from? Any info would greatly appreciated. Thanks.

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  • 8 years ago
    Best Answer

    Aviation daytime typically is 1 hour before sunrise & 1 hour before sunset. Only flying VFR would mean you cannot fly in IFR (Instrument Flight Rules) low visibility and ceilings.

    In my honest opinion I would go for the PPL since you could fly at night and day, you just can't fly IFR but that is my 2 cents hope this helps.

    For more information look in the FAR/AIM (Federal Aviation Regulation/Aeronautical Information Manual)

    http://www.faa.gov/search/?q=Far%2FAim&x=0&y=0

    LINK FOR THE PTS Standards

    http://www.faa.gov/training_testing/testing/airmen...

    Other Useful RPL Information

    http://brandonflyingclub.ca/training/recreational-...

    Source(s): Google.com www.faa.gov
  • 8 years ago

    1) The Canadian Recreational Pilot Permit (RPP) is only valid for use in Canada. You cannot fly to the USA with one.Since you mentioned the FAA then I must assume you are thinking of flying to the USA from time to time.

    2) According to Transport Canada (the Canadian civil aviation authority) , night means the time between the end of evening civil twilight and the beginning of morning civil twilight, which changes throughout the year and also depends on your latitude. In the vicinity of Vancouver "night" begins roughly 30 minutes after sunset and ends about 30 minutes before sunrise.

    3) The ONLY restrictions to a RPP are the day VFR requirement, the 4 maximum seat single engine requirement, the requirement to stay within Canadian airspace, and the single passenger requirement. Other than that, it is the same as the PPL.

    4) There is a contradiction here. In one breath you say that the PPL is considerably more expensive, and in the next you want to go fly someplace for dinner, which makes for an extremely expensive meal. I think you need to get your financial priorities straight. From a safety, operational and insurance standpoint, the benefit of additional flight training far outweighs the benefit gained from purchasing the proverbial "hundred dollar hamburger". Get the RPP, put any additional money toward getting the PPL afterward, and save expensive meals for later.

    5) In actuality, while the RPP flight time requirements are much lower (25 hours total), in reality the average student requires about as much flight time as required to get a PPL (45 hours) in order to gain sufficient proficiency to pass the RPP flight test.

    6) In addition to all that, any FBO that rents airplanes is going to be highly restrictive about where they'll let an inexperience recreational pilot fly one of their airplanes.

  • Anonymous
    8 years ago

    Hi!

    The only down lows i can think off is just a limitation on the type of aircraft, passengers and that you can only fly on Canada, but for what you want is not really that important.

    The restrictions about a VFR only is that you cannot enter Class A airspaces wich are only used by major international airports (not a problem) and above 18000ft.

    Daytime is referred by the period of time between 1 hour before sunrise and 1 hour after sunset.

    VFR is defined by the following conditions:

    You have to fly 1,000 feet above ground level (AGL) if there are no clouds. VFR pilots may only fly when visibility is not less than 3 miles (reported), no more than one mile from horizontal clouds, 500 feet away vertically and 500 feet AGL when clouds are present. VFR pilots may not fly through clouds at anytime.

    I analysed the sectional charts for that trip and you have no problems to do it with that license!

    Personally i think that license would be just enough for what you want and if you really like it, you can always upgrade! Wish you good luck.

    Source(s): me JAA - PPL IR ME CPL(A) FAA - PPL
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