Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsWeather · 8 years ago

can thunderstorm clouds pass through the stratosphere?

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  • TQ
    Lv 7
    8 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Pass-through? No

    Enter into? Yes!

    The updraft in some strong thunderstorms will bulge into the stratosphere.

    This phenomenon is called an 'overshooting top.'

    "overshooting top—(Or anvil dome, penetrating top.) A dome-like protrusion above a cumulonimbus anvil, representing the intrusion of an updraft through its equilibrium level (level of neutral buoyancy).

    "It is usually a transient feature because the rising parcel's momentum acquired during its buoyant ascent carries it past the point where it is in equilibrium; the air within it rapidly becomes negatively buoyant and descends.

    "Tall and persistent overshooting tops are frequently observed with strong or severe thunderstorms in which there is a nearly continuous stream of buoyant updrafts."

    http://amsglossary.allenpress.com/glossary/browse?...

    Source(s): Meteorologist.
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  • 8 years ago

    No. Because the stratosphere is define as the place where the air temperature starts increasing with altitude and that forms an inversion and clouds don't rise because the air above is relatively warmer.

    But sometimes, thin cirrus clouds can be lifted into the stratosphere and they can linger there a long time. Then there is also the fact that in a thunderstorm, the air rises often lifting the tropopause. For example, around the equator, the tropopause can be as high as 18 km above the sea where it is perhaps only 10 km at the poles. This is because a) the earth's rotation bulges the atmosphere at the equator and b) the strong convections of tropical storms lift the tropopause in many different thunderstorms. So yes, the top of a thunderstorm clouds can be higher than the surrounding tropopause but it is still in the troposphere. It is then like the ceiling of the room being uneven with upward holes in it.

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  • revak
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    Clouds In The Stratosphere

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  • 8 years ago

    Pass through No, GO in to Yes They are known as Tropo Busters. But mind you these are very in tense thunderstorms.

    Almost all thunderstorm clouds grow to heights above 20,000 feet. With 35,000 feet being typical. The more intense ones continue upwards until they hit the top of the troposphere, called the tropopause. Since penetrating into the stratosphere takes a lot of energy, many cumulonimbus clouds flatten out on the tropopause into the classic anvil shape with the tip streaming off downwind. If the storm is unusually intense, the updraft may punch into the stratosphere in cauliflower-like turrets. These “trop busters” are usually severe storms, with internal updrafts perhaps exceeding 100 mph. At any given place and time the height of the tallest storms is thus controlled by the height of the troposphere. Over the U.S. the tops of the stronger storms range from 40,000 to 65,000 feet from spring through summer and from north to south, respectively. There are some radar reports of echoes exceeding 70,000 feet, but if these reports are correct, this would be a very rare event. In any case, most thunderstorms are high enough that commercial jet traffic does not fly over most storms but rather circumnavigates since there can be “surprises” inside thunderstorm tops including extreme turbulence, hail, lightning, and wind shears

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  • Anonymous
    8 years ago

    No, they cannot pass through...assuming if you mean that they are created there...but if you mean to enter in there, then YES. They can most certainly enter into it. But they probably will no longer be thunderstorm clouds. If you mean cumulonimbus as of a thunderstorm cloud, then yes.

    You see, cumulonimbus clouds are the BIG hail clouds. They are so tall, that they reach the stratosphere. So I hope I just answered your question. :)

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  • Elliot
    Lv 7
    8 years ago

    No, but large thunderstorms may approach the bottom layer of the stratosphere. All weather-producing clouds typically stay in the troposphere.

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