The rise in antibiotic-resistant populations of bacteria?

-What effect does the increasing frequency of antibiotic resistance alleles in bacteria have on our potential ability to fight infectious disease in the future?

- What could be done to ensure that we have effective antibiotics for the future use?

-Where do antibiotics come from, and is it possible to create new ones to replace the ineffective ones?

- If antibiotics were no longer effective, how would this affect the gene pool of the human species?

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  • Anonymous
    8 years ago
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    1. The frequency of antibiotic-susceptible alleles decreases, and the resistance alleles begin to dominate the population.

    2. Responsible antibiotic use. Or - and some researchers are exploring this - develop antibiotics that do not induce a selection pressure but simply mitigate the pathogenicity of bacteria.

    3. Plants, molds, other bacteria, rarely animals. It is possible, that is what happened with penicillin. We had penicillin, then bacteria got resistant so we tweaked the chemical structure so we had ampicillin, then they got resistant to that so we made a new penicillin. We're on 4th generation penicillins now, I believe.

    4. This is a question that has a highly speculatory answer. I suppose the textbook answer would be... it would select against human genes for infection-susceptibility ("weak" immune system) I suppose, and select for infection-resistance, just like we did to the bacteria.

    Source(s): Microbiology, immunology, medicinal chemistry
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  • 8 years ago

    1. it decreases our ability because our bodies will no longer be able to naturally fight off bacterial infections and the antibiotics will be of no use.

    2. stop the parents from giving antibiotics to their kids for each and ever illness, especially when antibiotics won't fight viral infections. stop the use of everything being antibacterial.

    3. it is possible but they will be stronger and stronger so that they won't only kill off the bacteria but human cells as well.

    4. only people with natural antibodies would survive, and the gene pool would become very limited with a much smaller population.

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