Prosecutor: duty to inform the court of exculpatory evidence when . . .?

(this is a general question about miscarriages of justice. Previous Q with added parameters.) The defendant has no lawyer. The evidence is within the complainant's own statement to the police. There's no physical evidence against the defendant. There's no independent witnesses AGAINST the... show more (this is a general question about miscarriages of justice. Previous Q with added parameters.)

The defendant has no lawyer.
The evidence is within the complainant's own statement to the police.
There's no physical evidence against the defendant.
There's no independent witnesses AGAINST the defendant.
The complainant admitted in that statement to committing a crime against the defendant.

Now I'd like to add the following parameters:
The defendant has a mental disability and easily blames himself.
Due to his mental disability, the defendant does not recognize the evidence that exculpates him in the complainant's statement.
The complainant has identified the defendant as mentally disabled and has used this to justify abusing him.
Though the defendant has not been diagnosed, the signs of a mental disability are apparent (recognized by arresting officer).

Stick to these parameters, or don't answer at all - they define my question.
Don't worry about whether or not you're giving advice about a specific case - this is a GENERAL QUESTION about cases of a certain nature.

Here is a text used to train police officers and deals with this subject (I think some here may find it interesting and useful):
Principles of Kinesic Interview and Interrogation by Stan Walters
Update: To dobberx: Your answer in inane. Specifics of each case are always considered; otherwise, the Courts would simply rule without hearing the facts, based simply on the charge. Cases with these parameters are not rare at all, and even, ESPECIALLY, when parameters are rare these should be considered intelligently.... show more To dobberx:

Your answer in inane.

Specifics of each case are always considered; otherwise, the Courts would simply rule without hearing the facts, based simply on the charge. Cases with these parameters are not rare at all, and even, ESPECIALLY, when parameters are rare these should be considered intelligently. Do a little research and thinking before you answer. Then quote your sources. You especially. I've asked similar questions and gotten intelligent answers. My guess is that people are often so offended at you that they choose your answers as the best just so they can tell you off.
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