Want to write a novel/ book?

Right im a 19 year old lad, I work part time.. wanting to find a full time job but I always stop myself going fulltime because I want to achieve something with my life. Ive always enjoyed writing novels/ stories and now I want to write decent work and get spotted by someone for my work and become someone in writing. Is it hard to get spotted? What can I do to make someone spot my work? I know J. K. Rowling didnt get a break through intill she was about 30 so im feeling positive in the things I can do.. do I travel to a city like london and go and get my work out there to make people see it?

6 Answers

Relevance
  • Best Answer

    I don't know what you mean by "spotted". Writing isn't like acting, in that you get a big break and then suddenly you're famous. With writing it's much different. Location doesn't matter at all, so don't bother traveling to London. The first -- and most important -- thing to do is to actually write the novel.

    Average-sized novels range in length from 80,000 to 120,000 words, so bear that in mind as you write and remember to adequately pace yourself. Once it's finished in its entirety, you need to embark on a lengthy editing process wherein you edit your whole book three times or more. You do this to ensure it's completely free of grammar/spelling errors, that there are no evident plot-holes, that characters' back-stories remain consistent and that the entire thing flows logically. During this stage it is wise to recruit other people to help you, as it's often hard to see your own flaws. Once your finished novel has been edited, polished and edited again to within an inch of its life, you're ready to start the publishing process.

    To do this, you need to find a literary agent. Bear in mind there are plenty of scam-artists out there who are posing as agents, so be on your guard. Agents don't receive any money until you get published, so if an "agent" is asking for money up-front, then they are in all likelihood a fake. It's wise to only appeal to agents who specialise in your chosen genre, so it's a good idea to get your hands on a copy of The Writer's Market, as this will give you an in-depth rundown of all the potential agents you could deal with.

    Once you've chosen a diverse list of different agents (because let's be frank here, you're not going to strike gold on the first try), you need to compose a query letter that introduces your novel to the agent, and highlights why it would be popular in today's market. Query letter templates can be found online, and they usually include the first three chapters of your finished novel, although this number does vary from agent to agent.

    Once you've done this, it's out of your hands. You need to be aware that you will, in all likelihood, face a lot of rejection. Every writer does. Agents and publishers are particularly wary about new writers, as they don't have an established fan-base and therefore it's a gamble whether or not your book will sell. But don't let the rejection deter you. J.K. Rowling was rejected an absurd amount of times (over a hundred) before an agent finally agreed to take on her and her novel, Harry Potter.

    If an agent accepts you, then they'll do all the heavy-lifting when it comes to publishers. They'll pitch your novel to relevant publishing houses, as well as handle payment negotiations and things like that. Agents typically take a percentage of all profits you receive as payment, and once everyone has taken their share you're likely to receive less than $1 back per book sold. Yeah, writers don't make much money, unless they're a roaring success, which is why it's a good idea to have a day job to keep yourself sustained.

    And sure, you can go straight the the publishing house sans agent, but it's a bad idea. Most publishers won't even look at a manuscript that doesn't have the backing of an agent, so unless you want your hard work to end up in the trash unread, it's better to invest the time and money into an agent.

    So, good luck. Judging by this question, I'd say you still need to work on your spelling and grammar until you're at a publishable standard, so keep at it.

  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    Define your subject, research it. Find the niche. Write the book. Proof read it, have someone else proof read it. Have it edited. Send out query letters to agents. Send out synopsis to agents. Find an agent. Get the manuscript to him or her. Convince them that they should represent your book. Make changes to your book that the agent requires. Have the agent find a publisher.

    Usually this only takes a couple of years, but remember this:Agents have told me that everyone with a computer thinks they can write a book. One agent said they get 1500 query letters each month.

    You will not get "Spotted" you need to go after the agents.

    Check on the internet for a list of agents accepting new authors. That will be the hard part.

    Source(s): I have been there. No one else is J.K. Rowling. From what I have heard London has more new writers and you still need and agent. Check out agents first. But they will require a complete, perfected manuscript. Do that first. But work on your spelling and sentence construction. It is sorely lacking in presentation. An agent will cast it aside immediately if it is not exactly correct. www.jameshuberbooks.com
  • 3 years ago

    better watch a movie,than read a written publication.Of course,it is simpler to get an improved picture by watching the action(images),then browsing through all these words.

  • 3 years ago

    Television is only educational if you're watching a documentary or something similar

  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 7 years ago

    Most authors don't start off writing as a full time job...most have a full time job and keep it until their books become so popular that they don't need it anymore, but that's rare...

  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    So sit down and write it. No, you don't go do something dramatic and showy. Writers write, not tell people they write.

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.