Tony asked in Science & MathematicsPhysics · 7 years ago

Can insulators transfer electrons?

Insulators are materials that prevent the movement of electrons through it. However, why is it that the process of charging induction and friction electrons are transferred between them?

Also, why would you charge hand held insulators instead of handheld conductors during electrostatic experiments? answer both questions please

Update:

Plastic Comb and Hair are both insulators and they transfer electrons?

Update 2:

Plastic Comb and Hair are both insulators and they transfer electrons when rubbed together?

Update 3:

Plastic Comb and Hair are both insulators and they transfer electrons when rubbed together?

3 Answers

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  • Simon
    Lv 7
    7 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    It is the very fact that insulators do not readily transfer charge that allows the two phenomena that you mention. However, you can charge an object that is made of a conducting substance by rubbing it with an insulator. But -- in answer to your second question -- the charge would not be retained if the object were hand-held because you would serve as a "ground" and neutralize the charge.

    It is more complicated than could be explained here, so I refer you to this very informative discussion:

    http://www.staticsmart.com/esd-static-control-arti...

    Enjoy!

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  • 7 years ago

    Induction charging is not caused by electron transfer, but by electromagnetic induction. An oscillating magnetic field in the charger induces currents in a coil in whatever's being charged, which charges its battery. When electrons are rubbed off materials through friction, electrons TRANSFER, not FLOW (which cannot happen in insulators under normal conditions.)

    However, if a high enough potential is applied between two electrodes (about 3 million V/m for air), electrons are compelled to leave their atoms and flow with the electric field. In other words, it turns into a plasma which DOES conduct electricity (because of the free electrons) and creates an arc. More details here: http://hypertextbook.com/facts/2000/AliceHong.shtm...

    I'm sorry, but I do not understand your second question.

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  • 3 years ago

    they are able to, it rather is how a capacitor works. case in point say you have 2 metallic plates one turns into charged certainly one turns into charged negatively, there'll come a element while those plates discharge the place extra value will flow from the advantageous plate to the destructive, and electrons will from from the destructive to the possitive.

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