Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureReligion & Spirituality · 7 years ago

Do any mormon missionaries regret going on your missions?

I'm almost 19 and considering going on a mission now but I'm afraid of a lot of things to keep a long story short. What if I hate my mission? At the same time though everyone here is like " hey why aren't you on a mission"? I hate people who get in my face like that. But anyways yeah, what are your answers? I need help with this decision.

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  • phrog
    Lv 7
    7 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    you "need help with this decision" and thought the internet was the place to go for that? talk to your family - your parents - your bishop. talk to real people who know you.

    a mission may not be for everybody...but of those friends of mine who went - none have regretted it. they said it was hard and some days they just wanted to quit and come home...but the growth they gained by sticking it out (even if they later lost their faith) was worth it to them. and a mission is NOT about YOU...it's about doing the Lord's work. you either believe that or you don't.

    like joshsy..said - if you ask enough people somebody will complain about it and tell you no and then you will have the justification you are searching for to abandon the idea and blame it on someone else. (why else would you come to such a hateful place to ask?)

    good luck to you.

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  • 7 years ago

    I loved my mission. It wasn't always--or even often--easy, but it's made all the difference in my life. I'm sure you've heard the phrase "best two years of my life," but while that was true (or best eighteen months, anyway), I think it would be far more accurate to say "best two years FOR my life."

    The lessons you'll learn while in the field will change your life. You'll gain confidence, both in yourself and in God, a far better understanding of the gospel, a stronger awareness of God and the spirit. You'll get your priorities in order, learn how to work hard, learn how to dedicate yourself to worthy tasks, learn how to handle relationships. The things you'll learn from your companions will make you a better spouse and parent, better employee, better friend. And many of your companions will become closer than siblings to you. My best friends are still my former companions, and I've needed them over the years.

    And far, far more importantly, you can help change lives. You'll watch those struggling with doubts or misery gain peace. You'll see the joy that comes to their lives as they learn who they are and what this life should be. There are so many people ready to embrace the gospel, so many who just need to be found. It's truly incredible.

    That said, I have known a handful of people who regretted going. Without exception, at least in my personal experience, all of those were people who went for the wrong reasons, who didn't want to be there or didn't necessarily believe themselves. Missions change our lives, but they don't change who we are. They only make us more of what we already were. The doubter will only keep doubting. The one who only wants to go on a mission to please others will continue focusing only on what others think and not on why they're there or what they could be accomplishing. Before you make this decision, make sure you can look someone in the eye and tell them there's a God, that we have prophets on the earth today, and that the gospel can make them happier. If you can't do that, then you're not ready to go.

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  • Elsie
    Lv 6
    7 years ago

    I've never gone on a mission, but I listen to those who have gone and it sounds like the experience is more than one thing. They have spiritual experiences of course, but they also experience new cultures, develop new skills and broaden their horizons in many ways. So it seems it is an enriching two years in many ways. My brother who left the church decades ago still talks about his mission. It was a good experience for him. Some disgruntled ex-Mormons may say they regret it, but they are usually the kind that won't admit anything positive about the church anyway, so I don't know how reliable their opinions are. I do know a few who left their missions after a few months, but I think they were glad that they had at least tried.

    A lot of people are like you, they have fears and doubts about serving a mission. Some just go anyway, others don't and some go later. My advice is to live as though you are preparing to go, and make efforts to conquer your fears. Maybe you will come to a point where you feel confident enough. If you never get to the point that you can't bring yourself to go, you can feel good that you made a sincere effort in preparing to go.

    If anyone gets in your face in a judgmental way, just politely tell them that you appreciate the encouragement, but to please stop asking you about it.

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  • 7 years ago

    You should talk to your bishop. If you are suffering from severe psychological issues, then a mission might not be right for you. If you have ever been sexually intimate with another person, then you may not be worthy to go. If you are struggling with your faith, then perhaps a mission isn't the right place to find it.

    I was very shy, but wanted to go on a mission so I could share the gospel. It has been a great blessing in my life. I owed it to the Lord to not be miserly with my good fortune. I had some difficult times, but they were interspersed with great spiritual experiences. It was the greatest time of my life. I would do it again in a second. I also had one or two companions that didn't want to be there, and they were like poison. Their lack of the spirit of the Holy Ghost was a great detriment. If someone loves sin more than they love righteousness, then perhaps they are not ready to serve a mission. Like I said, talk to the bishop.

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  • 7 years ago

    I enjoyed my mission. I no longer believe Mormonism is true, but my mission was a really interesting experience in which I learned a lot about myself and about other people. So I would say if you believe in Mormonism, it is a good thing to do. if you don't believe, I would say don't go just to please other people or to meet the expectations of your family and friends. But as tapirrider said, if you want to go out and have an experience, there are other, probably more worthwhile, ways to do it, such as the military, the peace corps, etc. Why do I say that? Because most thoughtful people eventually come to the conclusion that I have - that Mormonism's core claims are demonstrably false.

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  • Kerry
    Lv 7
    7 years ago

    The most important thing to consider about your mission is that is it not about YOU. That may sound harse, but it really isnt. Its about sharing the gospel of Jesus Christ and serving the Lord. If you can forget about your own wants and wishes as a missionary, and focus on serving others, the work of missionary work goes forward, AND as a nice little side benefit, you grow up as a human being and loose a lot of childhood selfishness.

    The key then, is the "loose yourself" in the work; that is, not worry and stress and focus of your own needs and wants, but focus on serving others, and being an emissary of Christ and an instruement in his hands.

    As you do this, it really would not matter at all if "you hate your mission," and it would not matter what other people say. You are there for a singular reason: and that is to serve God with all of your heart, might, mind and strength. All personal matters can and should be put aside for two years. It can wait.

    Source(s): Lifelong member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
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  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    You could enlist in the Armed Forces. You are 19 years old. If you don't want to serve a mission then don't do it just because people are pressuring you to. After 4 years in the military you will be your own man and the religious pressure you are getting from family and friends will not bother you as much. Also, if they criticize you for not serving a mission you can throw it back in their faces that they must not be very patriotic and they aren't supporting the troops.

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  • 7 years ago

    Just remember - comfort, peace and love come from your Heavenly Father.

    Feelings of doubt, fear and confusion, don't.

    I have never talked to anyone who has regretted their mission. I am sure it is very hard, but nothing is impossible with the Lord's help.

    Satan knows you could lead people to the gospel, that's why you are feeling the way you are. He doesn't want you to succeed.

    But the Lord DOES.

    Source(s): LDS
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  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    if you ask enough of us you'll find a few who will say yes and complain about it. Just wait, after my comment searchery will tell you that it's a waste of time and some other guy will turn the topic to racism.

    MOST missionaries lover their missions and it meant the world to them.

    What if you hate your mission? It's your choice to love it or hate it. It's hard, and you'll have very hard moments - but if you have a good attitude you'll love it.

    You'll get out of it the experience that you expect - so go and forget yourself and your worries and love it.

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  • ?
    Lv 7
    7 years ago

    Of course there are mormons who have regretted their mission. Some have even committed suicide over their "failures". Most don't. They leave the LDS instead.

    Don't feel guilty even if you do go and like it, or even fail. You are not alone.

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