Republicans are here claiming to have passed the 1964 civil rights act, when Republicans just CANCELLED large?

...large portions of the Voting Rights act this year, passed as part of the same legislation!

Do you think they'll ever grasp the concept of "irony" in their claims?

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  • 6 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Heck, many still claim that they are the party of Lincoln while being staunch advocates of state's rights and the Confederate flag.

    The mental gymnastics they play is truly amazing.

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  • 6 years ago

    It's a matter of historical record that Republicans, then in power, cut a deal with Senate Democrats to invoke the rule of cloture and allow the legislation that became the CRA of 1964 to be brought up for voting on the Senate floor. As for the Voting Rights Act, which was a separate piece of legislation altogether, we suggest that it be modified so its provisions apply equally to ALL States to remove the punitive and discriminatory aspects many of us Southerners find objectionable.

    Republicans have historically championed equality and will continue doing so, We simply object to any efforts to declare some groups more equal than others.

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  • 6 years ago

    Smoking, the facts cannot be disputed. Republicans made a deal with Democrats to break the Democrat filibuster and pass the CRA. It also cannot be disputed the some of the CRA is being pulled back. The reason is that it is not needed anymore. Yes, there can be irony in this action.

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  • 6 years ago

    Just because government of all groups calls a thing "good" doesn't mean there's any good in it at all.

    Is the Patriot Act, in any way, patriotic? NO!

    Does the Homeland Security Act promote homeland security? ABSOLUTELY NOT!

    And the CRA doesn't do much for civil rights, nor does the voting rights act do anything for voting rights.

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  • Gary F
    Lv 7
    6 years ago

    What’s in a name? Everything is you are an intellectually lazy and dishonest Republican.

    The claim is an incomplete truth, but a deliberate lie.

    They conveniently fail to acknowledge that Republican and Democrat philosophies have changed over time and try to sell the idea that Republican = conservative and Democrat = Liberal.

    The take credit for Lincoln, but look at the 1860 election map:

    http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:ElectoralCo...

    The conservative states voted against Lincoln.

    They claim credit for women’s right to vote (1920), but, during the early 20th century, Americans held a generally progressive liberal philosophy. Look at the national demographics for the decades during which the suffrage movement developed

    1904: Roosevelt was a “Progressive” (not a conservative Republican)

    http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:ElectoralCo...

    1908: Taft, a Progressive

    http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:ElectoralCo...

    1912 and 1916: Wilson, a Progressive

    http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:ElectoralCo...

    http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:ElectoralCo...

    The Civil Rights Act was passed in 1964. The only states that voted for Goldwater were the “southern Democrats” (soon to become Republicans when Reagan appealed to their racism and bigotry):

    http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:ElectoralCo...

    And, in 1980 there was a shift in party membership after the Republican Party courted – and then married – southern conservative racist democrats (today’s republican core region and voter base).

    http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:ElectoralCo...

    Republicans who try to take credit for being the driving force behind socially progressive accomplishments are shameless liars. Here is the current political demographic – and we all know which regions of the country have histories of bigotry, racism, and opposition to guaranteeing all Americans equal civil rights:

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/44...

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  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    Everyone may still have the right to vote. Then why are the repubs trying to make it so difficult to vote, by canceling early voting days, and eliminating voting locations from poor neighborhoods that normaly vote democratic.

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  • > They in fact DID pass it and in fact are the ONLY party ever to bring Civil rights legislation to the floor.

    > The Voting rights ACT was and remains SEPARATE legislation

    Do you think at some point - ever - you might base a point on facts?

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  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    The vote count is online and clear. As to canceling portions of it, as people say, "times change".

    Much of the logic of the CRA and VRA was, to promote rights and Liberties, rights and Liberties must be limited or restricted.

    We're finding more equitable ways of doing that.

    Why is the voting rights act no forcefully enacted... equally... in ALL States?

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  • 6 years ago

    Rational people have been forced from the Republican party by religious fanatics and Jim Crow Democrats, jumping ship. Dems today are much more like Eisenhauer Republicans that the current day GOP. Present day Republicans today are far more like Jim Crow Dems than present day Dems.

    They are both just political machines, anyway, not ideological bodies defending principals.

  • 6 years ago

    Southern Strategy is a myth.

    "Coulter shreds 'southern strategy' myth as GOP successfully runs more blacks in conservative districts"

    http://www.washingtontimes.com/blog/watercooler/20...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_Rights_Act_of_1...

    "Vote totals[edit]

    Totals are in "Yea–Nay" format:

    The original House version: 290–130 (69–31%).

    Cloture in the Senate: 71–29 (71–29%).

    The Senate version: 73–27 (73–27%).

    The Senate version, as voted on by the House: 289–126 (70–30%).

    By party[edit]

    The original House version:[19]

    Democratic Party: 152–96 (61–39%)

    Republican Party: 138–34 (80–20%)

    Cloture in the Senate:[20]

    Democratic Party: 44–23 (66–34%)

    Republican Party: 27–6 (82–18%)

    The Senate version:[19]

    Democratic Party: 46–21 (69–31%)

    Republican Party: 27–6 (82–18%)

    The Senate version, voted on by the House:[19]

    Democratic Party: 153–91 (63–37%)

    Republican Party: 136–35 (80–20%)

    By party and region[edit]

    Note: "Southern", as used in this section, refers to members of Congress from the eleven states that made up the Confederate States of America in the American Civil War. "Northern" refers to members from the other 39 states, regardless of the geographic location of those states.

    The original House version:

    Southern Democrats: 7–87 (7–93%)

    Southern Republicans: 0–10 (0–100%)

    Northern Democrats: 145–9 (94–6%)

    Northern Republicans: 138–24 (85–15%)

    The Senate version:

    Southern Democrats: 1–20 (5–95%) (only Ralph Yarborough of Texas voted in favor)

    Southern Republicans: 0–1 (0–100%) (John Tower of Texas)

    Northern Democrats: 45–1 (98–2%) (only Robert Byrd of West Virginia voted against)

    Northern Republicans: 27–5 (84–16%)"

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