Anonymous
Anonymous asked in PetsDogs · 7 years ago

What are the pros and cons of neutering my dog based on his circumstances?

I have a 8 month old Blue Nose Pit / Labrador mix breed. I haven't had him neutered and am finding it difficult to decide if I even want to or not. He is already extremely well house trained and wont "mark" his territory and doesn't even mark things when we go out for walks. He is not aggressive at all with other dogs or people. I know that sometimes they have a higher chance of having diseases that relate to their prostate and/or scrotum if it's not removed, But realistically what are other risks that I'm looking at? Could it be possible that based on the circumstances of my dog that I may not HAVE to have him neutered, or is he really still too young to tell?

Any information would be greatly appreciated! :)

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  • 7 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    The problem is that if he is intact and encounters an in season female,he will be 100% trying to mount this female. I have 3 full pits myself , and they are all spay or neutered. The best reason is the world doesn't need any more puppies as 9000 dogs are euthanized every day in this country. I work at our city shelter and we get 70% pits and pit mixes in all the time. The females are alphas, and they are the ones that decide what is going to happen in the interactions with males, and all these dogs are altered by state law. They come in intact and are kind of freaked out by the surroundings but Have an in heat female in the kennels and we have cage fighting between males and will until 2 or 3 weeks have gone by. After that their testosterone level drops, and you get a very human oriented dog. It is safer for these guys to not want to fight over females, as the damage they cause when they do go at it, is terrifying to witness. I work around all types of dogs and the Pit can be a fantastic family dog, but uncut is a potential time bomb. It is the same for any male dog, but there are certain breeds that you want to keep as dog friendly as possible. We adopt out hundreds of males and females but we don't adopt to people with an uncut dog at home. as they are more aggressive than these that are altered. I socialise dogs when they come in, and they learn that no one is trying to hurt them. I show Pits to people everyday, and they are quite surprised at how calm and smart they are. They think the Pits will bite them or their kids, until they are around them, and I can show them a good number and most are surprised to see their kids laying on the dog, on the floor in our meet and greet rooms. So they get adopted, but You always have to inform them to be careful around other dogs. As they can be goaded into a fight by an aggressive dog. Haven't had any problems with my 3. They were dogs no one would adopt, and now people look at them and comment on how calm and lovable they are. They are great with kids, they keep licking the kids faces, and people that didn't know they were Pit Bulls are very surprised to have their kids laughing their heads, off petting my dogs. It is best to go with the things that make dogs more calm and friendly with everything they encounter, and males are 3 times as likely to have prostate cancer if they haven't been neutered. Females are much more likely to have breast cancer if not spayed. So it's a pretty good thing and it's safer for your dog, and others to be spay or neutered. One is puppies not being spewed out like so much garbage, and the healthier the dogs are.

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  • Kate M
    Lv 7
    7 years ago

    He is still young, so you might not want to make a decision yet. He can change as he matures.

    You need to be able to control an intact dog. It is not for everyone and you can be held liable if he does breed. Many dog day cares, boarding kennels, groomers, and cities restrict intact dogs or have higher fees for them. Some off leash areas prohibit intact dogs as well. An intact dog is more likely to wander and go looking for a female in heat, you must have a proper fence to contain him.

    There is a procedure where the dogs is rendered sterile, but still has about 50% of the testosterone. It is an injection into the testicles and has a quick recovery time with not actual surgery. It is fairly new and not all vets will be doing it, but could be a good option.

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  • T
    Lv 6
    7 years ago

    Personally, i'd get him neutered, just to reduce the possible health risks.

    HOWEVER.

    Some people (very, very few people) can handle an intact dog. I know of several people who have an intact male or an intact female and the dogs have never been pregnant or gotten another dog pregnant. If you don't plan on purchasing or housing any intact female dogs, then I don't see much of an issue if you choose not to neuter him, so long as you aren't going to breed him on purpose. It's your own personal decision. I don't much like the look of an un-neutered dog, so that is another reason why mine are all snipped, lol. Nobody can truly answer this for you.

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  • 7 years ago

    Too young to tell. He's not even an adult yet. He's hardly even an adolescent.

    By a year old, he's hitting full dog-puberty. He will change based on the added male hormones.

    Neuter him. There's no reason NOT to.

    You stated he's a "blue nose", which already tells me he's not a real American Pit Bull Terrier, he's a common pit-mutt with the "blue" gene. There are enough pit-mutts in the world, there's no reason to even risk the possibility of your dog adding to that.

    Just neuter him. He won't change. In fact, he's more likely to stay the way he is right now.

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  • Ocimom
    Lv 7
    7 years ago

    IMO while you seem responsible, the chances are high that in a few months your male dog WILL end up marking and he WILL end up wanting to get outside and breed any female he smells that is in heat.

    The fact that he is a mutt/mixed breed dog is all the more reason you SHOULD neuter him to prevent not only cancers, but him breeding more mutt dogs.

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  • Amber
    Lv 7
    7 years ago

    Neuter to prevent unwated puppies. Health is a whole different problem. You should always neuter unless you have a pure breed, tested for health issues, and a good line of dogs. Just like females.

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  • 7 years ago

    I believe it's too young right now, but I would definitely suggest neutering. There are so many puppies that are homeless and in shelters. Sometimes, dogs are killed because there are too many without homes. Neutering/spaying is the right thing to do. Good luck!

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  • You can sell his pups for a chunk of change if trained right. No need to fix what isn't broken.

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