Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Games & RecreationVideo & Online Games · 6 years ago

Should I let my 13 year old play Call of Duty?

Hello

My son recently turned 13 and we have a used Ps3. It came with many games, including Call of Duty:Black Ops 2. It also came with GTA V, and I let them play, as I played it, and they use it to joyride around. My 13 year old says all of his friends with a ps3 play, and he feels left out. I have an 8 and 11 year old as well, and I am not sure if I want to have them watching him play.

He brings up that my 8 and 11 year old play through GTA V missions, where you torture a man, use guns and gun down people. He says that they shoot civilians, so why can't I shoot people that are shooting at me?

None of them have any mental illness, and the 13 year old is ranked "Gifted" for his IQ level, so he has done research projects on Terrorists attacks, and sadly, school shootings and capturings.

I want to know if I should let him play. I let him once while his brothers were out with me, and he enjoyed it. He also suggested buying a headset, so only he hears the game, and possibly a monitor , but i turned it down. (he was going to buy it)

Thanks

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  • 6 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Well, when I was littler, I played games as such, and I too was mentally inclined (gifted). The stereotype that bad/violent games is just that, a stereotype, probably set by parents who were ignorant to video games, and didn't know how to raise a child with common sense. Every child knows you don't go out on the street and shoot someone for their car, just because they played GTA. In fact, if I DID have a child that would want to go out and do something like that, letting them play those games would help satisfy that want. Now let's step away from beliefs and talk more about these games.

    Call of Duty is not gory whatsoever since Call of Duty: World at War (which was drastically gory -representing the 1st world war and its brutality). The Call of Duty franchise is made up of designers and developers who know and respect war, and since most of them have actually been in the service of some kind they make these games to represent what each war is about (fiction or non-fiction), and focus mainly on the story of each war, focusing mainly on a main character who is very talented in the art of war, not just by killing, but by being stealthy (helps your child with puzzle-based problems), making the right call during the heat of battle - such as, do I shoot the 2 guys way in the back to minimze enemy numbers, or shoot the guy that's closer with a clearer view on my position to lessen threats (increased problem-solving skills and problem-reaction speed). The developers want you more to understand what it feels like to be in war rather than just going around mindlessly shooting bad-guys.

    More into the mechanics of the game, it's honestly not that violent. The game is so high-paced that you don't even pay attention to the killing of those enemy soldiers. When you are in the heat of the game, you are focused on racking as many points as you can, or collecting dog-tags, the actual objective of the game, not killing. During this time, enemy soldiers might as well be bubbles, and your just going around popping them, because I can say that I actually forget I'm going around shooting enemy soldiers, because I'm so focused on getting points.

    Let's move on to perhaps the most important part of this entire situation. A child is learning all the time (which as a mother, you obviously know). They are experimenting with what the like, and vice versa. Which means, you're child might not even like the game, and you making a huge deal about it (not accusing you of this) is going to make that child want to rebel and play it, and even force themselves to like it more. The less of an issue you make it, the less the child even thinks about the "bad-stuff" in the game. If your son asks why he cannot play, and you say, "Because there's grown-up things in it." He's going to start focusing on what actually makes this game "grown-up" to understand how it is. Just make it clear to them that just because they are allowed to play a violent game, doesn't mean they should be disrespectful and talk about crude and unmannerly things, etc; you're a mom, you know how to do it.

    And lastly, this is also important. There are parental controls and restraints that can be set through your Playstation Console and the game. You can restrict certain things to better shield your children, as to what can be shielded is solely based on the parental control options available to you, so you must do your best with them, and if they are not enough, you will have to find another solution.

    The worst, and perhaps the most crude or nasty thing about playing online games, such as Call of Duty, is not the game itself, rather, the players who play it. There are an incredibly staggering amount of bad-mouthed players (equally adolescent and adult) who ruin the online experience for both children and adults. That is why I would refrain from buying them a mic, unless you can insure he has only verbal access to his friends only.

    Sorry for the mouthful. As far as GTA goes. That is pretty much THE Prime example of what not to let children play because of violence. If you find that okay for your children to play, Call of Duty is a pebble to GTA's boulde-like status in this matter. Just watch out for the online vulgarity from other players that make Call of Duty not just a pebble, but a boulder itself.

    I hoped I helped, and good luck. Mother always knows best when it comes down to it.

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  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    I am going to tell you this as an 18 year old having no experience with parenthood, but a ton of experience with the two games. Call of Duty isn't a game that you can take seriously since it isn't that realistic. It has more of an arcade like feel to it. I would let my 13 year old (if I had one) play. 10 would probably be the youngest for me. As for GTA V I would wait until at least 15-16. There is intense violence, sexual content, and other obscene acts in basically every GTA game.

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  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    Being a current 16 year old, I have played many FPS games (First Person Shooter) throughout my youth thus far. I started when I was around 10 years old with the Call of Duty series and continue to play to this day.

    I did used to think that guns and that were very 'cool' and I really got immersed into the games, however I soon matured and just treat it normally now. Provided your son is able-minded, he should be able to work out that actions within the game should stay in the game and by all means not be enacted in real life (its called having a moral judgement).

    A lot of parents have a dilemma like yourself (including my own), being afraid that their child's mind will be twisted by violent games. In my opinion, this 'scare' has been brought about by countless numbers of news articles that have reported children being involved in violent acts, having been influenced by such media. However, that is just news and that reported are very rare and specific cases (although tailored to make it seem like every single child is at risk). I can tell you that I originally started to play due to all my friends doing so and I am quite sure that they are all harmless :)

    Anyway, in the end it is just your decision; of course your child could be that 1 in a million who will be influenced by the games and commit heinous crimes, but I'm sure that he will be fine (also he is 13 and he probably should have a grasp on the danger of firearms). As for me, I was equally addicted to playing 8 Ball Pool when that came out on Android but I still have 0 ambition to even take up pool in real life.

    Hope this helps~

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  • 6 years ago

    It's your choice. But boys as they grow up these games become popular and whatnot. It increases their skills and reactions , also how quick they can think. When they play online they can also chat to other people across the world , whilst this could be dangerous , it could teach them many life lessons , introduce them to more languages and improve their social skills. Just make sure that you lay the rules out flat to them first and clearly define whats right and wrong by comparing what you can do in the game to what you can do in the real world. Also if he's going online tell him not to give any of his personal information away.

    About the "feeling left out" thing , it's true. Im roughly his age and even though im a girl , i see that the boys that don't get involved with popular video games get singled out.

    Source(s): I have 3 brothers
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  • 6 years ago

    Ultimately it's your choice, but I started playing COD when I was thirteen. It has some swearing in it, blood, and killing/violence. The only reason he shouldn't play it is because people from all over the world can put on a headset and talk to anyone playing in the same game, and they might say very inappropriate things, but COD is a good game because it can quicken reaction time in real-life situations.

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  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    A game is a game really. Let your children have some freedom to have fun and experiment games! I get that you worry about them taking to the too much and becoming addicted and taking bad behavior from it but most children just use it to have fun and laugh with their friends as they learn to work as a team and find many other skills. If things don't work out just take it off them for a while, they'll soon learn not to do it.

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  • 6 years ago

    Oh heck, I've played some pretty bloody and violent games since I was what, 6? (quite literally I must say)

    It's been 8 years. I personally think he's fine. Too many kids already play CoD, why not add another?

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  • 6 years ago

    Yes it is not that bad. There are pg 13 movies that are worse. Violence is not that bad besides a little bit of blood. If you really want to you turn it off but it's not that bad anyway. Language is tame except the two black ops games . But the language can be turned off too.

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  • 6 years ago

    Call of Duty is fine But GTA 5 have topless girls

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  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    Its up to you, but if you let him play online i suggest you try mute people for him,because some people like to be jerks and like's to curse all the time. but everything's is up to you, he's your responsibility.

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