Do you always have to replace a toilet supply valve when you replace a toilet?

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  • paul h
    Lv 7
    6 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    I'd agree with Shorty....in a 7 year old house, there should be little corrosion that would affect the shutoff valve or cause it to leak. More likely a leak might occur if he doesn't tighten the supply line properly as it should be done...always check for leaks after any plumbing work or repairs for a week or so.....lay a paper towel under the shutoff valve area and check every day or so for drips. The guy is just trying to make a huge sum of money for a simple job. Most shutoff valves can be swapped in 10 -15 minutes or less and cost less than 10.00. The supply line might have to be changed since the height of the new toilet differs from the old one so that would be a reasonable extra charge although he may still overcharge for the cost of the new line. A good quality, braided steel flexible line only runs around 5 -10.00 at most at home centers. I just installed one when replacing the water inlet valve for a customer of mine.

  • 6 years ago

    I am replacing a toilet in a 7-year old house with a comfort height ADA-compliant toilet. The plumber is charging $100 through one of the big-box hardware stores to do the work. He just left for an hour or two (he didn't read the order, and forgot that he was supposed to pick up the toilets at the store). He said there might be a mandatory extra fee, if the comfort height toilet doesn't fit the existing supply line. Even if he can use the existing supply line, he said that I should replace the supply valve because otherwise he won't be responsible if it leaks later. There will be a $90 extra fee to replace the supply valve.

    Does this make sense for a 7-yr old house? I'm only going to be in this house for another 2-3 years.

  • 6 years ago

    The valve doesn't really have to be replaced if it shuts the water off like it should, but they usually cost less than 10 dollars and corrosion could be setting in if the present valve is 7 years old. Look at it as a little bit of insurance. However $90 for this is a big rip-off, it takes maybe 5 more minutes to change. If it were me I would find another plumber if it isn't too late, otherwise tell this one just do what the original job called for.

    Source(s): I do my own house maintenance.
  • 6 years ago

    I would tell the plumber NOT to change the valve. The valve on our toilet is 30 years old, and it still shuts off fine. The supply line is also fine, no leaks.

    Also, if you choose to change the valve and/or the supply line later, because there are leaks, or for cosmetic reasons, it's easy to do. A handyman or friendly neighbor can help you do it if you don't feel comfortable doing it, yourself. All that's needed is a wrench, and the parts are about $5 each. Takes about 10 minutes, and the toilet does not need to be removed.

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  • XTX
    Lv 7
    6 years ago

    == that "" plumber "" is ripping you off for an extra $90.00 === most likely it is a good idea to replace the tube/line/plastic hose that supplies water to the toilet tank but as far as replacing the little shut-off valve that is located at the wall -- I would doubt that it needs to be replaced ... report him to the big box store where you bought the china throne ...... now=a=days that valve has plastic internal parts and that valve will last for about 20 years .... there is nothing in the valve to rust ..............

  • 6 years ago

    if it works don't fix it.. good advice for just about everything

  • ?
    Lv 4
    6 years ago

    No..

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