Why do people bother to vote?

Government has proven itself to be a profit-making industry that only assists the rich in getting richer. If they all have to follow the same rules, why bother to vote for any of them? Is there a way to run the world without giving all the money and resources to an empire, allowing them, (government) to allot the resources to whoever they choose?

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  • DR
    Lv 6
    6 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    You are right, but there is a way out of this mess.

    The perpetual corruption results from almost everyone either not voting or voting for Democrat or Republican mainstream candidates. Why do we just jump back and forth, voting one or the other into office? By now it's clear that that won't change anything.

    Why should we forget about the past harm they've done? That harm was not accidental; it was the result of both responding to lobbying and acting based on party ideology. We should assume that politicians of both parties will repeat some of their past harmful actions.

    Enough people voted for Republicans in 2010 to give them a House majority, while we were still suffering from the economic consequences of policies pushed by Republicans. We got rid of them only two years before that. What about Republicans had changed in two years, that we should trust them? Nothing. Their bad deeds merit their permanent banishment from public office, unless they stop taking special interest money. And voting for Democrats in 2008 was questionable also, because they contributed to those same problems. So I think we should not be too satisfied with just these two choices.

    Some voters were seduced by Obama's charisma or saw his election as a chance to break down a racial barrier; they did not consider that he is just as compromised by special interests as previous candidates were.

    I hate it when people dismiss a candidate early in the election cycle by saying "he can't win". We're supposed to vote according to our beliefs. We are not supposed to look at who other people support, and on that basis join in to support one of those candidates. The election isn't a high school popularity contest where we're scared of not being in the "in group".

    Some of us are not content to accept only candidates whom the influential people (whoever they are) say have a chance, nor to abandon those who allegedly have no chance. Some of us will not accept the usual bought-by-corporate-interests candidates who are presumed (so early in the campaign) by the corporate media to have the best chance of winning. ANY candidate has a chance of winning public office if enough of we voters choose that person. The people we see on TV say who can win, but really WE decide.

    Because no special-interest-influence-free candidate wins at the conventions of either major party, my voting strategy requires choosing neither Democrats nor Republicans. Other parties' candidates still appear on ballots. It does not matter which candidate, because that candidate will not win the election this time around. It's OK to vote for a goofball or crackpot. I would rather vote for a random minor party candidate I don't believe in than give consent to my abuse by voting for a bought candidate.

    If more people start protest-voting for those minor party weirdos you see on ballots, then sensible independent candidates will notice that and try running in various elections. And then we can vote for those people. As a bonus, this will pressure the two main political parties to adapt to voter preferences more than big campaign donors would like.

    That third party strategy has a risk of splitting the liberal vote between two candidates (as happened with Ralph Nader in 2000) or the conservative vote between two candidates (as happened with Ross Perot in 1992). The best outsider candidate would be a non-weird centrist who can steal votes equally from both parties; if that centrist belonged to a party, the party would have to refuse all special interest money.

  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    Don't get me wrong a large amount of politics is about money, however it is also about change. Voting equals representation and if people want a change voting for the change should bring it foreword and create a better society. Also not all parties believe in the rich getting richer so if you share those views you should vote for them and be represented for wanting this change. Those are more left wing parties.

  • 6 years ago

    Because as much as it might suck our system is still the best last hope of mankind is why. Self determination and representative democracy is messy but still better than North Korean alternatives.

  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    Mainstream media manipulates the masses of the importance of voting to make it appear like they actually have a say in politics. It's all a hustle and a decoy to hide that the elections are rigged and leaders are choosen behind the scenes propped into place.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sR2wR4vp_ao

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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ISprIUmx7o

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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=boEtTA0mCHY

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  • 6 years ago

    They pulled this question out, and I fought back. I see it has been posted again. Thank you for allowing me to have freedom of speech, this time.

  • 6 years ago

    Because they want a voice in who governs them.

  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    They often give out suckers.

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