Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureReligion & Spirituality · 6 years ago

How do atheists explain all the bible predictions that came true?

That is evidence for the bibles legitimately and follows the scientific method because it can be tested and has been repeated many times.

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  • 6 years ago
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    No, honey. LOL. The Bible is like any mythology or even a broken clock-- it's right occasionally, simply due to odds.

    But predicting wars, famine, etc. is not an amazing feat, since these things have been occurring since long before the Bible was written.

    To use science as a test we have to look at the whole Bible:

    - it says bats are birds

    - it says insects have 4 legs

    - it says rabbits chew cud

    - it says donkeys and snakes and burning bushes talk

    - it says the earth is flat (a disc held up on pillars)

    - it says Jesus would return before his generation passed

    Taking into account all the thing the Bible gets wrong you have to scientifically conclude it's no better than guess work.

  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    The Bible does not use scientific method. It's a book of stories and myths, not a scientific theory. There is no way you can test the Bible in a scientific manner, to even suggest this indicates you don't know what science is.

    If you make 1000 random guesses, a few of them will hit the mark - that's statistics and probability at work, nothing more.

  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    The prophecies written in the Bible are incredibly vague and can be stretched to be made to apply to just about any modern day event. The few that mention specific names and events that seem, at first glance, to be fulfilled prophecies are written down after the fact. For example, the "prophecy" that Cyrus the Great, founder of the Achaemenid Empire would free the Jewish exiles after decades of captivity in Babylon, as per Isiah chapter 45. What most Christians are unaware of is that the book of Isaiah was written in three or four distinct parts, in three or four different time periods, and that the part containing this prophecy was written around the time of the return from the Babylonian Exile (approximately 530BCE).

    To long didnt read version: the prophecies of the Bible to not meet burden of proof and are not evidence for either the existence of god or the validity of the Bible.

  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    The Bible is a book, not unlike a Stephen King novel but a lot less believable and certainly less exciting. There are a lot of things wrong with this ancient tome, not the least of which are the many assertions, or prophecies claimed by the authors as absolute. These ancient desert dwellers claimed they originated with God himself, and must therefore never be questioned. Well, the fact is, like many things the ‘Old Man’ was alleged to have said, many have been just plain wrong. After all if the Bible were true it would not contain any failed prophecies, yet it does.

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  • 6 years ago

    And what about the ones that didn't? That is evidence for the bible's fallibility for not following the scientific method. The bible as been tested, and always manages to come up Fail.

  • 6 years ago

    How do Christians explain all the unfulfilled prophecies in the bible. As far as the bible using scientific method, do you have any idea what you're talking about? It really doesn't look like it.

  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    What about Jesus's supposedly returning so soon yet it's been over 2000 yrs? Lol the Bible is just a bunch of myths put together. Whoever wrote it must have a been a sadist.

  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    Explain the mechanism by which the monk writing a passage that eventually found its way into bible could foresee events that would happen years in the future? There is none. No one has EVER been able to tell the future beyond using intelligent guess. There is simply no mechanism for doing so

  • 6 years ago

    You mean things like "there will be wars and rumors of war" and "people will run to and fro" and "men will be lovers of themselves?" Stuff that's true all the time? Or do you mean the stuff that was specifically written to make it sound like prophecy was being fulfilled, like the authors of Matthew and Luke getting Jesus born in Bethlehem but raised in Nazareth through two completely different and incompatible stories?

    We're not gullible enough to fall for that stuff.

  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    Yeah, it's easy to make it appear your fairy tale is true if you write it AFTER the "miracle" has already occurred...and that's what happened in EVERY instance of a prophecy being fulfilled that's written in your Bible.

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