Alarmists, SHALE DRILLING SET TO BEGIN IN BRITAIN, doesn't this show the lack of confidence that CO2 is causing Global Warming?

“With the decline of North Sea gas and our ever increasing reliance on gas imports, including shale gas imported from the United States, developing an indigenous source of natural gas is critical for U.K. energy security, our economy, jobs and the environment,” Cuadrilla CEO Francis Egan said in a statement. “We are proud as a Lancashire company to be at the forefront of that effort.”

The British government estimates shale basins in the country may hold more than 1.3 quadrillion cubic feet of natural gas, a level the government said could help an economy with natural gas imports on pace to increase from 45 percent of demand in 2011 to 76 percent by 2030.

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  • JimZ
    Lv 7
    3 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    You get a lot of anti-science from people like Steve S who suggest fracking is destroying our water supplies. These sorts of hysterical warnings are the same thing the usual suspects do for every source of energy (as they are currently doing with CO2). They pretend to be all for "renewables," solar and wind, lately (no doubt some alarmist faithful treat those energy sources with borderline religious adoration) but that is only as long as they can use them to attack more important energy sources.

  • 3 years ago

    NO. Nothing & no one originally from earth was & is the cause of Global Warming. A species NOT from our Universe has implemented their Organism that creates global Warming. As is these species left earth but are returning since in the last 40 years have implemented a city underneath Antarctica & their organism is keeping the freshwater melted in the western part for incoming UFO'S. That's why ice is still melting in Antarctica. Mike.

    Source(s): Simple Logic
  • 3 years ago

    No. Britain needs oil as do most nations. As for global warming, climate change, extreme weather conditions you can blame this on the sins of the people who occupy earth. As sin has increased, man has always, always suffered for sinning against God.

  • 3 years ago

    No. The US managed to reduce its CO2 emissions by around 8% largely as a result of fracking. What happened in the US was that their coal industry largely collapsed and cheap gas replaced it. The bottom line is that gas-fired power stations produce less CO2 than coal-fired stations.

    What the UK and other nations are trying to do is reduce their CO2 emissions while simultaneously trying to provide enough power for industry and homes and keep an economy growing. Changing from coal to gas is one way of doing that.

    Your question suggests that you believe that 'alarmists' like me are arguing that we just stop using fossil fuels. We're not. That's impossible. What we do believe is that we need to reduce our CO2 emissions. Switching from coal to gas isn't a perfect solution, but then perfect solutions only exist in fantasy-make-believe worlds. In the real world, gas is better than coal in terms of CO2 emissions.

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  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    Are you talking about fracking? You'll regret doing it when you have no drinking water left.

    Frack off

  • 3 years ago

    No, it shows that money trumps common sense (which, incidentally, is not all that common).

  • S
    Lv 7
    3 years ago

    no

  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    1

  • Kano
    Lv 7
    3 years ago

    No it does not, it only shows a need for more energy.

    In the UK wind has not been successful solar never stood a chance in the first place, that leaves coal gas and nuclear,

    These obsolete monster nuclear stations have run into problems, with permits, thousands of regulations which means they are too costly and take too long to build, the UK does not like coal even though it built Britain into a great industrial nation, so that leaves gas. so we better find some of our own.

  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    A survey by the Business and Energy Department showed just 16% supported the controversial process of shale gas extraction, down from 21% last year and the lowest since the study was launched five years ago.

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