I have a question about a lien on a title in North Carolina. Yesterday I purchase a motorcycle it had a lien on the title but the owners?

Showed me the documents Indicating that the lien is clear and it was also notarized by a notary. I get to the DMV today and they said there was an error on one of the sections indicate the lean portion of the title in which they put none instead of writing the information down from the documen.. I have tried to contact the people I got it from. But unfortunately they will not answer the phone for me Nor none of my messages. So I went back to the DMV and told the lady that I couldn t get in touch with them so she process the title and gave me a registration but said the title maybe on hold .. my question is it possible in the state of North Carolina to register a bike that has a lien on it. wouldn t they would have seen it in the computer. I was still giving a registration?

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  • 3 years ago

    As she wrote none in the lien space your title she didn't give you a title with a lien on it. but it looks like they are going to check it out to see if it is indeed clear. I hope you get through this with a bike. Never again but a vehicle without a clean title. This is very suspicious that they won't talk to you. If you know who the lien holder is contact them.

  • 3 years ago

    The posters are correct. You should contact (or write) the seller and advise them they are still liable for the car and if you're in an accident they are the ones that will have to pay.

  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    Simply wait to see if you get a title. If you do, problem solved. If you don't, visit your seller in person and demand they get a valid title for you.

    Grammar matters

  • 3 years ago

    You got scammed. I believe the proper wording in your case is "hook line and sinker".

    You fell for the "it's notarized" trick, because you thought that notarized must actually mean something in court. When a document is notarized, it means an official notary public asked someone if the document in question was their own document, and the person said yes under oath. That's all notarized means. I could write up a statement claiming that I am next in line for the Crown of England and all her domains and commonwealths, and any notary public would be happy to notarize my document. But guess what, having my statement notarized doesn't mean I'm the next British monarch. It just means someone verified that I said so in writing. That's all a notarized statement means.

    Unless the registered lienholder will provide a written release of interest, that vehicle will never be legally yours. Don't look for a legal way around it, because there aren't any.

    Note: You're not totally helpless here. Leave a message for the seller of the bike, saying you might have maybe parked in a handicap spot for a few minutes, then you rode off quickly before the ticket could be handed to you. And during your hasty departure, you might have possibly knocked over a pedestrian. You didn't run away from that accident, in fact you gave them the VIN number of the bike. But then you looked this stuff up, and you found out that the registered owner (not the driver, not the almost-buyer) of a vehicle is 100% legally responsible for stuff like parking fines and injury lawsuits. And since the bike can't be legally transferred to your name, because of that lien and stuff, you just thought they should know in case any warrants or lawsuits are issued.

    Say that, and I'll bet the seller will call you back that very same day.

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  • Anonymous
    3 years ago

    It is likely you got scammed. Never trust anyone except your dog whenever you are parting with your hard earned money. If the title is not clear, the registration will be revoked. See a lawyer.

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