Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureReligion & Spirituality · 1 year ago

Jehovah's witnesses and Trinitarians: Who are the gods mentioned in Psalm 82:6 and John 10:34 and why are they not in block letters?

Update:

And, why didn't Jesus reiterate what the Jews say and clearly state that he is God instead of specifying that he is God's SON in John 10:36?

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  • TeeM
    Lv 7
    1 year ago
    Favorite Answer

    This Psalm calls the human judges of Israel "gods" and children of the Most High. They were called gods because they represented God in executing judgment and thus have the power of life and death over God's people.

    Jesus used this passage to defend his claims to be a god and a son of God while denying he is God.

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  • 1 year ago

    You mean JWs and Christians. If Jesus had gone around saying he was God the Son, his ministry would have been extremely SHORT.

    @ spectacles & Teem -- Why are you playing silly games? Or are you just "slow minded"? All Christians are Trinitarians.

    Source(s): Greek Orthodox Christian
  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    Psalms 82:6-8

    Earthly gods abased and brought down, v. 6,7. The dignity of their character is acknowledged (v. 6): I have said, You are gods. They have been honoured with the name and title of gods. God himself called them so in the statute against treasonable words Ex 22:28, Thou shalt not revile the gods. And, if they have this style from the fountain of honour, who can dispute it? But what is man, that he should be thus magnified? He called them gods because unto them the word of God came, so our Saviour expounds it (John 10:35); they had a commission from God, and were delegated and appointed by him to be the shields of the earth, the conservators of the public peace, and revengers to execute wrath upon those that disturb it, Rom 13:4. All of them are in this sense children of the Most High. God has put some of his honour upon them, and employs them in his providential government of the world, as David made his sons chief rulers. Or, "Because I said, You are gods, you have carried the honour further than was intended and have imagined yourselves to be the children of the Most High," as the king of Babylon (Isa 14:14), I will be like the Most High, and the king of Tyre (Ezek 28:2), Thou hast set thy heart as the heart of God. It is a hard thing for men to have so much honour put upon them by the hand of God, and so much honour paid them, as ought to be by the children of men, and not to be proud of it and puffed up with it, and so to think of themselves above what is meet. But here follows a mortifying consideration: You shall die like men. This may be taken either, 1. As the punishment of bad magistrates, such as judged unjustly, and by their misrule put the foundations of the earth out of course. God will reckon with them, and will cut them off in the midst of their pomp and prosperity; they shall die like other wicked men, and fall like one of the heathen princes (and their being Israelites shall not secure them anymore than their being judges) or like one of the angels that sinned, or like one of the giants of the old world. Compare this with that which Elihu observed concerning the mighty oppressors in his time. Job 34:26, He striketh them as wicked men in the open sight of others. Let those that abuse their power know that God will take both it and their lives from them; for wherein they deal proudly he will show himself above them. Or, 2. As the period of the glory of all magistrates in this world. Let them not be puffed up with their honour nor neglect their work, but let the consideration of their mortality be both mortifying to their pride and quickening to their duty. "You are called gods, but you have no patent for immortality; you shall die like men, like common men; and like one of them, you, O princes! shall fall." Note, Kings and princes, all the judges of the earth, though they are gods to us, are men to God, and shall die like men, and all their honour shall be laid in the dust. Mors sceptra ligonibus aequat—Death mingles sceptres with spades.

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  • 1 year ago

    They accuse Jesus of making himself "God". In v 36, he translates their allegation as equivalent to the accusation that he's the "Son of God".

    So: he himself uses "God" and "Son of God" as interchangeable labels in that context. He's not denying anything. If anything, he's helping them see a personal distinction between him and the Father. But the point is the title "Son of God" is a title of deity nonetheless.

    The Psalms says that God mocks the rulers of that day and "calls them gods" (I said), but in reality they are not "gods", but they are humans who will die.

    Jesus says that word of God is true in that God called them "gods' mockingly, but Jesus is saying that He is the true Son of God, whereas they just think they are "gods", being deluded.

    • TeeM
      Lv 7
      1 year agoReport

      Actually he uses, 'god' and 'Son of God' which is what Ps 82 describes the human judges at verse 6.

      He actually tells the scribes and Pharisees 'you are gods', so how can he be blaspheming by saying he is God's Son.

      Jesus is actually denying the false claim, you are making yourself 'God'.

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  • 1 year ago

    This Psalm calls the judges of Israel "gods" and children of the Most High. They were called gods because they represented God in executing judgment. Jesus used this passage to defend his claims to be God.

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