I'm Auditioning as a Guitarist for an Ozzy tribute band any advice?

so they sent me some songs which are Crazy Train and I Don't Know, so I went on Youtube and listened to both and they seem fairly hard.

My friend said to not be nervous and to avoid playing Black Sabbath songs cause they want to see what I can do as a guitarist in general.

From what I heard I have to pay:

Something Melodic

Something Fast

Something like a Ballad

Something Complex.

These are the Randy and Jake years. So we will see. I am using an Ibanez RG 550.

If I played Eruption do you think they would be impressed? That tops almost anything they can get.

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  • Andrew
    Lv 7
    3 months ago
    Best Answer

    I've been playing guitar for many, many years. And I happen to be a huge Ozzy Osbourne fan. In fact, Randy Rhoads was my primary inspiration for picking up a guitar to begin with.

    Just because you can play something that's difficult, that doesn't mean that you've got the chops to be able to hold down your end in a band playing cover songs. So what if you can play "Eruption" note for note? Big deal. That's Van Halen, it's not applicable in the least to anybody playing in an Ozzy tribute band.

    There are plenty of guitarists out there who can play a few difficult pieces. If you're wiling to put the time and effort into something, it's likely that it will eventually pay off. I could play Randy Rhoads leads before I could strum chords decently because that's what I focused on learning.

    Ozzy songs are not easy. They're fairly intricate. They're not like Black Sabbath songs where the same plodding riff is present throughout. There are lots of changes, there are lots of fills, and the leads aren't easy. Each guitarist that appeared on an Ozzy record had a different style, and if the band you're interested in playing with incorporates songs from each era of the band, you're going to have to learn songs that were written by people who approached the composition of a song very differently.

    "Crazy Train" and "I Don't Know" aren't all that difficult by the standards of Ozzy songs on the whole. In fact, they're very similar. Both use an A pedal tone to drive the riff along and even many of the fills are quite similar.

    If you're going to be the sole guitarist in the band, then you can likely forget it. If you don't know how to play two of the easiest, most famous and most iconic Ozzy songs he has to his name, then it's likely that you're not familiar enough with the material to be able to slide into the role as sole guitarist.

    Ask the other members what songs they'd like to rehearse with you during the audition. If the two that you mentioned are the ones they're looking to hear, then you had better learn them; however, if there are a few other songs that you feel you'd like to try, ask them if that would be acceptable to them.

    Live staples would likely include:

    "I Don't Know"

    "Crazy Train"

    "Goodbye to Romance"

    "Suicide Solution"

    "Mr. Crowley"

    "Flying High Again"

    "Believer"

    "Bark at the Moon"

    "Secret Loser"

    "Shot in the Dark"

    "Miracle Man"

    "Crazy Babies"

    "Mama, I'm Comin' Home"

    "No More Tears"

    And possibly tracks from the sub-par records Ozzy released after "No More Tears", if the band is willing to delve into that pile.

  • 3 months ago

    in crazy train you have to learn to gallop which is really hard and the solo isn't that hard just the galloping parts and if you can play eruption i think you'll be able to play crazy train if you can't learn crazy train you should do eruption.

  • Danny
    Lv 7
    3 months ago

    Dear DTS, don't worry about it.

    If you're responding to an internet site, Craigslist, or a hunk of paper on the 'board at the music store, it's as much of you auditioning them as the other way around. You likely got some chops, but have you worked with a band before? Odd stuff like timing, getting in the zone with the bass & drums, etc. can kill you if you can't fit riffs/shredding into it.

    Mess with a set list if you can get one. Nobody, at that level, is gonna get anybody who smokes the whole list. Just try for a couple done right. The rest of your specs are in no way special for a tribute band - they're more like what any good band wants in a #1 guitarist.

    Plus being in some understandable age limits, showing up on time and reasonably straight, having giggable gear (and not needing like an hour to set it up), boring stuff like that.

    All the while, you check them out. Off to a scheduled start, like within say a half-hour? Or nobody really ready, endless yakking about how to do stuff, the guy who's garage you're in seems to run things regardless of his lack of real musical chops, beer & reefer use in play or in a break like every fifteen minutes, etc., etc. This **** goes on and on. Sure, give it a couple of hours, but bail.

    If it's a really good band, hell, they should have already heard you. You don't need to reinvent yourself. Relax, give it a good shot, see what happens. If the experience is cloudy, but you get accepted, sure, go for it. Any working band/stage work can make you better.

    Lots of bands out there, so just keep going.

    Source(s): Retired performer after maybe fifteen bands.
  • Anonymous
    3 months ago

    Tribute band?

    Schit bra I thought you meant the real thing. You got to be clear on details like that otherwise people will be jamming you up for paperwork and calling you a troll and schit.

    My bad bra.

    Truth be told it's a cover band. You should be fine with eruption but go ahead and try to learn crazy train to.

    Source(s): 7
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  • Tony B
    Lv 7
    3 months ago

    I'd have thought if they sent you recordings of two songs they are the songs they're going to want you to play at the audition.

  • 3 months ago

    What good are you to them if you can't play Crazy Train or I Don't Know and those songs are on their set list?

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