masslady asked in PetsRodents · 9 months ago

Is a 4-5 month old rat easy to tame?

I found a hard ware store that just got 4 male 4-5 month Dumbo rats are they easy to handle?

8 Answers

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  • 8 months ago

    Answers Depends on the rat's personality

    Before I answer that I need to give you some more information. Rats will die of depression if they aren't in pairs or groups and require 2 cubic feet of... Before I answer that I need to give you some more information. Rats will die of depression if they aren't in pairs or groups and require 2 cubic feet of space in a cage (the critter nation is a popular choice) aswell as the entire thing fikled top to bottom with toys. Their startup cost is around £500 but they also need at least £100 saved for vet bills as most need a vet throughout their lifetime (especially ones from shops and not ethical breeders as they have been severely inbred). Thry require at least one hour outside the cage freeroaming in a room. You can not use a ball unless you want a dead rat. As long as you go through the taming process correctly it should be easy. Leave them alone for a few days and spread your scent on all their stuff. Start offering food from your hands and letting them come up to you. Never pick up a rat that has not been tamed because their bites hurt - and they will bite. Youtubers such as Emiology have great videos on this.

    Well, they can be tamed, easier if the taming started at two weeks. 4-5 month old would be considered full grown, and how easily they would tame depends on... Well, they can be tamed, easier if the taming started at two weeks. 4-5 month old would be considered full grown, and how easily they would tame depends on the socialization they had before this.

    Individual personalities play a roll also.

    How easy to handle and tame, more your background with rodents and small animals.

    Sooo totally, completely depends on 2 things. First, were they handled and interacted with everyday? Second, depends on their parents and genetics. Baby... Sooo totally, completely depends on 2 things. First, were they handled and interacted with everyday? Second, depends on their parents and genetics.

    Baby rats should be handled at least once between being born and their eyes opening for health purposes and identifying. Baby rats should be individually identified when first born to keep track of their health and growth.

    I very highly doubt your average pet store rat will have any special breeding done, identification, or health records. This is why so many people recommend true rat breeders. Aka rattery's

    Yes, as weird as it sounds, they exist. Expect to pay $50 or $60 bucks for a truly well bred and pedigreed rat. These lines are known to be cancer and aggressive free. They've been bred with health and temperament in mind. As well as appearance and body shape kept in mind.

    Yes. If they have been handled already, they are already tame; but you can make them more friendly by handling them more. But if they have never been... Yes.

    If they have been handled already, they are already tame; but you can make them more friendly by handling them more.

    But if they have never been handled before, you have to be aware, the first time, that they may not know the difference between your hand and food. Imagine the rat's point of view: whenever the hand goes into the cage, there is food. If you don't actually give them food, they will think the hand must be the food. They don't know that people can be companions, only that food comes from them.

    In that case, put your hand around the rat's body and pick him up right away, without letting him smell your hand first. Then he won't think you are feeding him. Or you can hold a big piece of solid food like apple or carrot or breadstick for him to nibble on. Put it in your lap or on your shoulder and within minutes he will understand that you are a friend, not food.

    This of course will not work with a wild rat. But pet rats are, for the most part, born docile.

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  • 8 months ago

    Depends honestly. If the previous owner had, probably. If not, then probably not. Doesn’t take too long for rats to adjust to owners though!

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  • 9 months ago

    Depends on the rat's personality

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  • Nathan
    Lv 4
    9 months ago

    Before I answer that I need to give you some more information. Rats will die of depression if they aren't in pairs or groups and require 2 cubic feet of space in a cage (the critter nation is a popular choice) aswell as the entire thing fikled top to bottom with toys. Their startup cost is around £500 but they also need at least £100 saved for vet bills as most need a vet throughout their lifetime (especially ones from shops and not ethical breeders as they have been severely inbred). Thry require at least one hour outside the cage freeroaming in a room. You can not use a ball unless you want a dead rat. As long as you go through the taming process correctly it should be easy. Leave them alone for a few days and spread your scent on all their stuff. Start offering food from your hands and letting them come up to you. Never pick up a rat that has not been tamed because their bites hurt - and they will bite. Youtubers such as Emiology have great videos on this.

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  • 9 months ago

    Rats are extraordinarily easy to train; much easier than a hamster or even a cat! They're extremely intelligent; some saying more than most Dogs! Rats are incredible animals and become very attached to their caretakers (or as I call myself, the "Rat servant" 😂). The only issue that could potentially effect how easy it'll be for taking them is how well they were taken care of. If they were abused, they will likely not be very easy to tame. If they were neglected or never handled or taken out of their cage, they will likely not be easy to tame. If they're Snake food and not treated as pets, they will likely not be easy to tame. However, this is not always true. I've had many abused, neglected Rats that were very skittish as scared when they came in (I ran a rescue/foster home for 3 years), but working with them and providing what they need (and more lol) allowed them to warm up to me very easily. It all depends on the Ratties! I really hope this helps!! Good luck! 😉

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  • 9 months ago

    Well, they can be tamed, easier if the taming started at two weeks. 4-5 month old would be considered full grown, and how easily they would tame depends on the socialization they had before this.

    Individual personalities play a roll also.

    How easy to handle and tame, more your background with rodents and small animals.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    9 months ago

    Sooo totally, completely depends on 2 things. First, were they handled and interacted with everyday? Second, depends on their parents and genetics.

    Baby rats should be handled at least once between being born and their eyes opening for health purposes and identifying. Baby rats should be individually identified when first born to keep track of their health and growth.

    I very highly doubt your average pet store rat will have any special breeding done, identification, or health records. This is why so many people recommend true rat breeders. Aka rattery's

    Yes, as weird as it sounds, they exist. Expect to pay $50 or $60 bucks for a truly well bred and pedigreed rat. These lines are known to be cancer and aggressive free. They've been bred with health and temperament in mind. As well as appearance and body shape kept in mind.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 9 months ago

    Yes.

    If they have been handled already, they are already tame; but you can make them more friendly by handling them more.

    But if they have never been handled before, you have to be aware, the first time, that they may not know the difference between your hand and food. Imagine the rat's point of view: whenever the hand goes into the cage, there is food. If you don't actually give them food, they will think the hand must be the food. They don't know that people can be companions, only that food comes from them.

    In that case, put your hand around the rat's body and pick him up right away, without letting him smell your hand first. Then he won't think you are feeding him. Or you can hold a big piece of solid food like apple or carrot or breadstick for him to nibble on. Put it in your lap or on your shoulder and within minutes he will understand that you are a friend, not food.

    This of course will not work with a wild rat. But pet rats are, for the most part, born docile.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
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