So I'm working for a new company and they want me to design their logo. I have some versions of the logo already. How much should I charge?

Should I charge 7 dollars an hour or something? & should I patent it before showing them?

Update:

I'M NEW TO BUSINESS, SO I REALLY DON'T KNOW!

18 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago
    Best Answer

    DO NOT PATENT THE LOGO.

    You want to be paid right, so do what I said above!!!

    The only way I would consider making a patent, or do anything else from a legal perspective with whatever I make is if I think one of my ideas is going to either

    make ---> ME <--- a millionaire, multi millionaire, billionaire, or multi billionaire, or trillionaire, or multi trillionaire etc.

    "The cost of a logo design is anywhere from $0 to tens of thousands of dollars, but if you're a small business or startup looking for quality design, a good logo design should cost between $300-$1300."

  • Eva
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    You don't patent a logo, you trademark it. You can't trademark a logo that you sell to someone else, they have to trademark or copyright it. If you are their employee, you should charge them the amount of time it takes to do it. If you are an independent contractor, you'll give them a flat rate.

    • Nuff Sed
      Lv 7
      2 weeks agoReport

      In theory, a logo in the form of a decorative article of manufacture could be subject of a "design patent", giving slightly different (and short-lived) federal rights against imitators.

  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    If you are working them for them, it's likely going to be considered part of your job and not subject to more pay.

    • Nuff Sed
      Lv 7
      2 weeks agoReport

      "working for them" can mean either freelance or employee.

  • 3 weeks ago

    If you are working there as an employee, anything you create while on the clock belongs to the company. You do not charge them additional amount for what you produced while they were paying you an hourly wage.

    If you are doing this as a contract on the side - not acting as an employee of the company - then you can charge whatever you believe your services are worth. Since you are new to this, I can't imagine charging more than a few hundred dollars for creating a logo. In fact you may want to do a few for free so you can build up a portfolio of work to show to future clients.

    As for how to protect your images to ensure you get paid the agreed fee - you simply do not allow your client to have a copy of a usable image until you have been paid. You should watermark all copies of images that you show them with something like "draft image, owned by bob's graphic design, not for public use" or something like that. After they agree to a final version AND pay for it, you provide the customer with high resolution digital images which they can reproduce for their advertisements.

    • Nuff Sed
      Lv 7
      2 weeks agoReport

      Yes, it is important to lay out the employee/contractor relationship PRIOR to creating the work, including how you get paid (if at all). Copyright ownership arises the moment the work is created, not when the artist get paid. YOU want to be the one who owns the copyright, not as a "work for hire".

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  • 3 weeks ago

    Are you an employee?  If not, then you need to agree on any pricing before you start.  

    Keep in mind, someone on fiverr would probably design a logo, but there are also dedicated websites for this sort of thing:

    https://www.designcrowd.com/crowdsourcing

    • Nuff Sed
      Lv 7
      2 weeks agoReport

      Yes, ask him. Or, better yet, tell him you consider yourself an independent contractor who automatically owns the copyright of the resulting work product, which you then agree to license to him or his company...

  • 3 weeks ago

    How big is the company. If it’s a mom and pop store then maybe a few hundred. If it’s a big company, tens of thousands if not hundreds of thousands. Think about it. Your logo will be displayed everywhere so if it’s a company like Honda it’ll be displayed worldwide. 

    Intellectual property has no value. It’s however much you and your client agree it’s worth. 

    The company pays you so they own the rights unless it specifically states that you own the rights and the company is renting it from you. It’s like marvel vs Todd McFarlane. McFarlane created a bunch of characters for marvel and since he was paid by marvel, everything he created belongs to marvel. I believe he created venom (the form we know. But the alien costume was created by somebody else). Venom is worth millions today and McFarlane got nothing. 

    • Nuff Sed
      Lv 7
      2 weeks agoReport

      Under  US copyright law, if the client of an independent contractor wants to own the copyright, they have to prove a properly written and signed agreement for a "work made for hire" of a qualifying type of work, or a written transfer of the legal ownership inherent in the artist's original creation

  • 3 weeks ago

    Patent is for an invention. Copyright is for drawn or written stuff.

    Your contract with the new company should have laid out the pricing.

    • Nuff Sed
      Lv 7
      2 weeks agoReport

      More to the point, if you have not yet agreed to do the work, in a written contract, you need legal advice to make sure you get the copyright ownership correct -- i.e., the way you want.

  • 3 weeks ago

    As an employee, you are already being paid for your work.  You don't charge them any additional amount.  I read your additions.  Sounds like you were just hired by a start-up company.  DO NOT charge them anything.  Unless you were hired "under contract", then you will be paid as an employee.  The work you are asked to do is what you were hired for, and what you will already be paid to do. 

    • Nuff Sed
      Lv 7
      2 weeks agoReport

      You could have an oral contract to be an employee, or a partner, or an independent contractor. If the "company" wants to own the original copyright, it's up to THEM to make sure they get it right BEFORE the work is created.

  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    These logos that you already created...did you do that while you were at work?   If yes, you've already been paid. 

    • Nuff Sed
      Lv 7
      2 weeks agoReport

      Begs the question: "at work" for whom? In the USA, working for yourself or as an employee result in different copyright ownership, absent signed documents to the contrary. 17 USC § 201.

  • John
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    If you are working for a company you don't "charge" them.  They pay you and they own everything you do on the company dime. But you knew this, didn't you?

    • Nuff Sed
      Lv 7
      7 days agoReport

      Another angle: If you're not an employee, but you're working "together" on a new company, you might even be considered a "partner".

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