Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Food & DrinkVegetarian & Vegan · 8 months ago

Would you class vegainsm as a starvation diet? ?

Me and my bro were discussing it. We're both meat eaters and very health concious we wanna learn more about nutrition and health. With veganism, you're quite limited in nutrient dense foods, without taking some sort of supplement. That's not ideal to be popping pills as your food replacement. What are your views? 

24 Answers

Relevance
  • Anonymous
    8 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    Yes I would personally, that's why I'd never become a vegan. If begin a vegan is someone's thing, then more power to them, people should eat according to their own preferences. As long as they don't try to moralize or shame people for eating meat, or protest restaurants and farms. Once they cross that line they just make people hate vegans.

  • John
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    Of course not, its taken a bit of research but I find natural protein sources to be my diet most of the time.

  • Todd
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    - The vegan diet is fraught with a lot of issues, but can be handled. I'd be mostly worried about missing amino acids, some vitamins and minerals, and there's also the gut ecosystem problem. Those little helpful microbes need to eat too :)

    - Upshot, not a starvation diet, but bordering on a malnutrition diet, especially if it's a pious diet (no product of animals, which leaves out most mass produced vitamins and minerals)  Accoriding to nutritionists, even meat eaters have a hard time getting all the nutrients they need, so it's a sure bet vegans with a very strict diet much less so.

  • Jane
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    I am not vegan, however I work in a vegetarian kitchen that regularly serves vegan dishes that are very popular.

    As I understand it, the only essential nutritional deficiency in a balanced and healthy vegan diet is Vitamin B12, that may require supplements. 

    https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/eat-well/the-vegan-di...

  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • Daisy
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    No, not a starvation diet.

    It's an incomplete diet, but if one eats a LOT, they won't starve. They may feel like crud, but they won't starve.

    They need to take pills, get shots or eat highly processed foods to get the nutrients not found naturally in meat, eggs and dairy.

    Research has shown almost 90% of them will eventually go back to eating animal products again anyway.

    https://www.curezone.org/forums/am.asp?i=1728051

    https://reason.com/2019/10/07/can-vegetarianism-st...

    https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/article/going-vegan-...

  • Anonymous
    8 months ago

    No, I wouldn't class veganism as a starvation diet - that's a very odd idea!

    A person following a vegan diet needs to ensure they get the nutrients present in a standard omnivorous diet and that they still consume a balanced, nutritious range of foods.

    So far as I am aware vitamin B12 is the only thing completely missing from a vegan diet unless supplements are taken or fortified foods consumed. I don't see this as a problem. I'm not a vegan and yet I see that my breakfast cereal is fortified with vitamin B12. That's the case with many “ordinary” foods and drinks we consume.

    I reject the notion that a vegan diet is “more healthy” than a standard omnivorous diet - either of these diets (and a vegetarian diet) can be “healthy” or “unhealthy” depending on what's in them, but nor is there anything “unhealthy” about being vegan. 

    There are many people following an ordinary diet who take supplements and pills and there are plenty of non-vegans who are desperately unhealthy largely because of their diet!

  • 8 months ago

    It’s pretty labor-intensive. I know there are vegan bodybuilders. I also know that there are a lot of people who are not vegan who are probably less healthy than those who are if  the calories non-vegans  are taking in are not very nutrient dense. If you’re going to be a vegan you have to know how to combine amino acids in your meals to get complete proteins, like combining legumes with rice for example (rice and beans) because one lacks the amino acid that the other one has. So combining them gives you a complete protein. And you don’t necessarily have to eat them at the same meal either to get that benefit. Going vegan just requires more thought and more work sometimes, which is not always a bad thing.. Just takes more self-discipline. But if you do it right you can be very healthy I imagine. Some people also fund big  benefits in a raw food diet,because cooking foods can destroy many of the enzymes . Also, I’ve read that intermittent fasting puts your body into a state of ketosis which actually helps build muscle. It sounds counterintuitive but a lot of things that might seem that way actually work in reality. I used to do juice fasts, and just recently tried to do a semi-fast mainly eating salads, which I had to break,  but when I started doing it I actually started feeling much stronger, mentally alert and had more vitality in general  than I normally do. Sometimes eating in general, particularly the wrong foods which you might even be allergic to, can actually slow you down and make you weaker. It’s been proven that one of the most reliable ways to extend your lifespan and even improve your brain function (Because fasting stimulates something known as BDNF or brain derived neurotrophic factor) is by intermittent or more extended fasting. They say it even helps people with Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and other neurodegenerative conditions

  • Anonymous
    8 months ago

    You can get a lot of calories on a vegan diet. Carbs and fats are very dense in calories, certain fruits and veggies are really high in vitamins. However, vegans are just as unhealthy as the fatties who eat nothing but hamburgers. The Mediterranean diet is really good. Trout and salmon have 90g of protein per lb, but very little calories. However, you can make up for that with carbs. I prefer rice. Hot peppers are loaded with vitamin c, yams are loaded with potassium and beta carotene, squash has a bunch of carbs, but is low on the glycemic index. All of these foods are super light, but you can make high calorie meals with them that don't fill you up. If you're trying to clean bulk, I think it's the way to go.

  • 8 months ago

    no, but you will lose fat weight.

  • Pearl
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    i dont think so

Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.