Anonymous
Anonymous asked in SportsOutdoor RecreationHunting · 8 months ago

Stupid or Smart? I have a pathological fear of getting lost when I hunt. So I don't hunt so much as I backpack with a rifle?

I step out of the truck, I have tent, down bag, week's food, water filter, 2 gps, and 4 ways to make fire. Problem: Most hunters are walking around with what's in their pockets and rolling their eyes at me like I'm missing a chromosome.

10 Answers

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  • Robin
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    your phone has GPS

  • Anonymous
    8 months ago

    You are not stupid. Anybody can be a victim of ignorance. Maybe you have experienced getting lost which could mean you were ignorant of the danger at that time and didn`t have a "spare". However, to repeat the event, knowing from previous experience that you could get lost again, yet venturing into the same situation as unprepared as the first...that becomes stupidity!

    Maybe your peers are lacking a chromosome.

  • JOHN B
    Lv 6
    8 months ago

    You don't have a chromosomal problem. You have a psychological problem. I think it's called Paranoid Schizophrenia or nervous paranoia but I'm not a shrink. Better to be safe than sorry.

    You can also tie little strips of plastic to the tree branches as you enter and do away with the paraphernalia

    Of course, then you'll worry that someone is behind you altering your strips to purposely mislead you. You're damned if you do and damned if you don't.

  • 8 months ago

    Well, there are those that can get disoriented traipsing the woods, but you do enough of it, you can at least read the sun and stars and know to go thatta way to get back.

    Yea, I guess it could be like a phobia, but easy to overcome if you just get out there and do it. A liter of water, some health bars, jerky, or trail mix, a survival blanket, you can go as long as a week, But I do use a small pack with stuff like a 2-way radio, a collapsible rifle, a survival knife,magnesium fire starter and some fish hooks and line, still under 20 pounds and could go a few weeks if need be.

    I have not even been camping over a decade for failing sight and hearing. Can't drive, but at least can still fly til my next medical, anticipate getting grounded.

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  • 8 months ago

    You don't have a mental problem.  You have an outdated equipment problem.

    My current wife was a mountain climber.  Her tent, sleeping bag, stove, RO water maker and 90% of equipment - took up the same area as my military cold climate sleeping bag that I loved - and - to add insult to injury - all of her stuff was much lighter than that sleeping bag.  I did several successful caribou hunts with her in Alaska.  

    After I got rid of all my military surplus equipment and moved into nice new stuff - I did a hunt with two friends.  My ATV had a totally empty rear rack.  Those guys?  Had both the front and rear ATV racks full of stuff piled high - they looked like overloaded Sherpa trucks in Napal!!!!  We have a 6 hour drive across high tundra to get into prime hunt area.  I asked, "Where are you going to put the caribou if you get one?"

    "Oh, we'll be eating and using things - there will be plenty of room"

    15 hours later it is 5:30am and both have 400 pound dead caribous to deal with.  It's raining freezing spray at this high altitude. No time to bone all the meat.  Because I had half of one guys boo on my ATV and half of the other guys boo on my ATV - I had not room to put one if I wanted to shoot one.  Moving very slow we proceeded out of there - on the way there were 4 opportunities for me to nail a caribou, small mini-groups of 4-7 caribou some we passed at 10 yards and they watched us go by.  Easy pistol shot.

    Because of their ineptness - or being cheap - I got both friends into my favorite caribou hunting area but I could not get a caribou for my own families because their equipment took up too much room - too bulky and way too heavy.  This is why they look at you funny. Having your old military stuff is fine when you drive to the beach or drive to a campsite.  When you are way off the beaten path, all on your own, that old crap can get you killed. Instead of brining the equipment designed to last 40 years - the stuff that is tough, light, reliable, - you have the cheap, questionable gear that might get you hypothermic or killed.

    Yes, it cost money...But.... Imagine the 100lbs of crap you brought last time reduced to 9lbs of nice new stuff.  Now image what cool goodies you could bring that you would have never had room for?       

  • Anonymous
    8 months ago

    Never really lost but had to stop and scratch my head and get my bearings.

    In a large National Forest it could be easy to get turned around and become 

    disoriented. 

  • 8 months ago

    Knowing some basic wood/survival skills means you won't need to carry so much equipment. Being aware it IS easy to get lost is a good mindset, but being obsessive about being lost isn't. I suggest being more aware of how to read maps, especially topographic maps where you can identify roads, streams, peaks and other landmarks. Knowing how to read maps can point you to areas where there could be saddles and chokepoints others may not notice, which can help with hunting in many ways. 

    I take survey tape with me hunting, simply because I hunt in tough terrain sometimes and if an animal can move past my immediate line of sight or into thicker brush after the shot I can mark my shooting position, last known spot for the animal and I can follow the blood trail if I can see the animal down AND be able to re-establish my start points. I know people who use thumbtacks with the reflective heads so they can spot ingress routes they've scouted before. You could use markers similar to tapes or tacks for marking/blazing trails. I also plot my hunting day through mapping/planning so I know I'll use a square or rectangular hunt scheme or point to point because hunting means scouting when you don't see game sign. Going into new terrain is normally the hardest aspect for hunting because you haven't scouted and you have to rely on your maps and dead reckoning. I normally hunt higher on slopes in the mornings and lower in the day because of thermals changing. Now, if you're swamp hunting in the south it's a little different because there is pretty much just brush and you need a compass sometimes just to see where north is. Same basics apply, mark spots as needed and establish your comfort zone and expand off that.  

    GPS waypoints are your best insurance these days, but knowing you can find your truck at the end of the day or survive a night out if needed are both good things. 

  • Adam D
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    It sounds like perhaps you should consider some sort of professional advice regarding this phobia.  It's a bit extreme to carry all of that out of fear of getting lost.  Phobias aren't rational, and it may help you to get to the root of where this fear comes from.

    I feel like if I had the 2 GPS units, I could probably leave the rest at the truck and go anywhere, even someplace completely unfamiliar, without worrying about getting lost.  I normally only carry a backpack with water, my lunch, and a spare phone charger pack.  I should probably add a first aid kit and fire started before I head out again.

  • BBean
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    You are not stupid. Anybody can be a victim of ignorance. Maybe you have experienced getting lost which could mean you were ignorant of the danger at that time and didn`t have a "spare". However, to repeat the event, knowing from previous experience that you could get lost again, yet venturing into the same situation as unprepared as the first...that becomes stupidity! 

    Maybe your peers are lacking a chromosome.

  • TB12
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    So what do you care what other hunters think, hunters have been known to get lost,

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