Sonia asked in PetsDogs · 2 months ago

Chinese herb for my dogs failing vision.?

To any TCM on the internet, my dog is a 12 year old miniature pinscher 12 lbs. She has failing vision due to aging. Nothing special or specific. I was thinking of getting her the herb called Visex or by it's Chinese name, Ming Mu Di Huang Wan.

Do you think this is fine? If so what dose? If not, what do you recommend?

4 Answers

Relevance
  • Maxi
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    TCM is not going to help 'failing vision due to aging', you need to take the dog to the vets to see if anything can be done, (which is highly unlikely) or if you prefer to a trained/qualified homeopathic vet

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 2 months ago

    Absolutely NOT. Chinese herbs are not regulated and NEVER should be given to pets. If your dog is losing its sight GET IT TO THE VET. There could be things that could be done.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 2 months ago

    Before you give your dog any thing like that, check with your Vet. Don't ever give your dog anything that you haven't run past your Vet first. Always.

    If you don't know anything about it, don't give it. Go to an Herb shop & ask the employees.

    • ZotsRule
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      Seriously?  You think the people SELLING these products are going to be honest about their safety for pets?  REALLY? So weird you first say to go to the vet - which is correct - then tell them to talk to shop employees.  What an irresponsible person you are.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • *****
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Do not do this unless you clear it with a holistic vet that's well-versed in herbal medication for dogs. Dogs can metabolize substances differently than humans, and many products that are safe for human use are not safe for dogs. 

    Additionally, most vision problems in older dogs are the result of cataracts forming, which is not a condition that herb is claimed to help treat (it only claims to help prevent them). Cataracts, once formed, are irreversible physical damage to the lens that can only be treated surgically. 

    • Login to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.