are surnames of non english origins anglicized in Usa?

for exapmle trump from drumpf if I am not wrong

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  • Speed
    Lv 7
    2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    Yes, many "foreign sounding" names were anglicized, often without the knowledge or consent of the people whose names they were, right at Ellis Island.

    In my family's ancestry, Trompater became Trumpeter, Mac Auley turned into McCauley, and Tremaine was now Truman.

    I have an acquaintance whose family name Campbell turned into Camwell due to a speech impediment of the first forebear to arrive at Ellis Island.

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  • 1 month ago

    You lost me points two

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  • Marli
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Some were in the immigration shed at Ellis Island.  Imagine standing in a barn-sized room where everyone has to shout. Your "papers" are inspected by a man who can't read Greek or Russian, and German "schrift" is almost as baffling to read. He asks for your name.  You, perhaps half comprehending, say what sounds like Kalbfuss. He writes down something that sounds like Coldfoot or Codfish or Calboose.

    Or you go to court and "Americanize" your name because "real Americans" can't pronounce your name or they laugh at it.  You want to pass as an American, not an immigrant, because people with "American" names are less likely to be approached by fraudsters and more likely to be hired to good jobs. 

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  • 2 months ago

    Rarely. Usually it's the actual person that goes to a judge and changes it. My grandparents were from Austria, they had an umlaut over the "o" in the last name. We don't do umlauts here, they had it changed to an 'oe' instead.

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  • Mike
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Frequently the original names are translated into English. Schmidt, Braun, Weiss, Schwarz, Stein, Johannsen, Marechal, Blanc, Boulanger, for instance.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Some are. Some aren't. Trump is a German surname derived from either the word for "drum" or for "trumpet".  The name is on record in use in Europe from the 17th century. It has not been  Anglicised.

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  • Ludwig
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    Yes. Trump is one example.

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  • martin
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Certainly, everyone tries to blend in, once they know that their family will live permanently in the USA.

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  • 2 months ago

    yesssssssssssssssssssssssss

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