Do other planets experience "Northern Lights"?

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  • 8 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    They do... pretty much any planet with a magnetic field and an atmosphere can. Jupiter's aurora have been photographed by Juno, Saturn's were as well by Cassini:

    https://youtu.be/7AmyfuJDMlY

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  • 8 months ago

    The ones with a strong Magnetic Field do

  • 8 months ago

    they should do if they meet the correct orientations.

  • Mike
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    Any planet with an atmosphere and a magnetic field has aurorae.

    Jupiter and Saturn both have aurorae.

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  • 8 months ago

    Yes. They can be seen around the poles of any body with a substantial magnetic field, for instance Jupiter.

  • Clive
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    Yes, as long as they have all the same requirements for us to get them on Earth, which are an atmosphere and a significant magnetic field.  So all the gas giants do.  The other rocky planets don't because of - you guessed it - no significant atmosphere, no significant magnetic field, or neither of those.

    What forms an aurora is charged particles from the Sun being funnelled down towards the poles by the planet's magnetic field and then hitting the atmosphere, where the collision with molecules in the air creates light.  So if you've got the magnetism and the air, this is going to happen from time to time.

  • Anonymous
    8 months ago

    Islam provides the answer to your question. Uman bin Al-keen (may Alah be pleased with him) explains in the hadith that Allah subhanahu wa ta'ala controls the sun, moon and stars using His two great sceptres: alqamar and shams. One sceptre governs the moon, and the other governs the sun. When Allah (may His name be praised) holds out a sceptre, the said star will rise to greet its Creator. (Uman bin Al-keen 2205)

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  • 8 months ago

    Yes, some do. About the only requirement is some level of atmosphere or gas that can ionize with solar radiation. Add some element of geomagnetism, and aurora can happen.

  • 8 months ago

    Yes, they do. Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune all have global magnetic fields much stronger than and thick atmospheres Earth's relatively weak global magnetic field with a relatively thin atmosphere, so they all have auroras, northern and southern lights.  

    Venus does not have auroras because it rotates too slowly to maintain a magnetic dynamo effect to create a global magnetic field despite probably having a liquid outer core. Mars doesn't have a global magnetic field because too much of the outer core has cooled off and crystallized and Mars has a very thin atmosphere. Mars DOES have regional remnant magnetic fields.  Mercury has a global magnetic field , but no atmosphere. It is unknown whether Pluto has a global magnetic field, but it probably does not. The magnetometer was sacrificed to cut down on mass and the mass of the fuel needed to launch New Horizons. 

    https://www.discovermagazine.com/the-sciences/what...  

  • 8 months ago

    On some of them, thery have been seen: https://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/34778784

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