Donald Chump asked in PetsHorses · 1 month ago

To steer a horse does the rider kick it on the side they want it to go or on the opposite side?

I thought they pulled on its mouth with the reign but I just seen a thing where it looked like they banged their boot into it and it went the other way, Is that right?

16 Answers

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  • 1 month ago

    You use your reins to make them turn, and then you give em a kick to tell them to "go," otherwise the horse just turns their head in that direction but you're still sitting in the same spot, and maybe thought you just wanted them to look that way. Unless you and your horse are telepathic, you gotta give them a nudge or something additional to know what you want them to do next, i.e., to turn and then go that way.

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  • 1 month ago

    Pull the reins the way you want them to go and bump them with your foot on the opposite side. Think of it like pushing them to the right direction 

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  • 1 month ago
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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Use a shock collar.

    • LindaL3 weeks agoReport

      WELL THAT'S AN ASSHOLES ANSWER!!!

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  • 1 month ago

    Nobody bangs or kicks, you nudge your heel into the side, a light touch. You also lay your rein against the side of the neck they need to move away from. Pulling on the mouth can cut the mouth sides, it's not a proper way to guide a horse. You pull back to have them stop, but not to the point where it injures the mouth.

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  • Eva
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    A good rider does not kick. They squeeze with the leg on the same side they want it to turn. To go left, they squeeze with the left leg. In general, the reins control the front end and the legs control the hind end.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Riders who are well trained have no need to "kick" any horse to get it to move, Donald. I can get the horse I ride to do as I want him to by simply squeezing gently with the calves of my legs. I don't wear spurs, because he doesn't need them- he's sensitive enough that they only upset him. Which leg signals I use depends on what I want to do and on the direction I am moving in. 95% of the rider's control of any horse is in their legs, back, and seat. Less than 5% is in their hands. And you never "pull" the reins. Instead, you close your hands and fingers around them, and sit down when you want to stop or change gaits. If your horse is trained and has a soft mouth the way my horse does, simply closing your fingers around the reins is more than enough to get the horse to stop. You can stop a trained horse by using your back to stop your own motion, too.

    People who resort to kicking are usually poorly trained riders on badly trained or mistreated horses. And I hate to see riders that haul on their horse's face like it was made of rubber. That teaches horses really bad habits, and even worse, they learn to ignore the bit or they become afraid of it.

    Source(s): I'm a horse owner and dressage enthusiast, and have been so my entire life.
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  • 1 month ago

    A well trained horse can be guided with pressure from the legs.

    Reins attached to a bit are not needed nor are spurs.

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  • 1 month ago
  • Frank
    Lv 5
    1 month ago

    The horse is guided left and right by the reins. Using spurs, the horse is prompted to move forward. The horse is typically told to stop by pulling back on the reins and saying “whoa”.

    • They still use spurs? Is that only in America? If I saw someone kicking a horse with spurs I'd damn well call the cops.

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