Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsAstronomy & Space · 2 months ago

Mathematicians: could the value of pi have been different?

If our universe were just slightly different than the one we live in now, could the value of pi ended up different, or is this the only value of pi that there could possibly ever be, no matter what the universe was like?

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  • 2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    Yes.

    Logic in mathematics seeks to avoid circular proofs. In order to accomplish this, it has to begin from a base with statements which are presumed to be true. These statements are known as axioms and postulates.

    The geometry most of us studied in high school is Euclidean Geometry: It is based on a set of postulates, proposed by Euclid.

    There are other geometries that start with other postulates. In these geometries, the value of π could be different.

    Before the 20th Century, most people believed the universe was flat, and Euclidean geometry held everywhere at every scale. But, along came Einstein, who proposed that mass could bend space-time. This lead to people thinking the universe might not be Euclidean. If that is the case, π might have a different value.

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    • duke_of_urls
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      In any universe, Euclidean pi has the same value. If you're in a non-Euclidean universe, your non-Euclidean 'pi' would be a dependent value, but even in that situation, you could recognize that you're in a non-Euclidean universe and still calculate Euclidean pi.

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  • 2 months ago

    Pi is the constant value of a perfect circle. as long as the universe posses circle ,then the value of Pi remain constant . Unless any universe do not posses any circle or become linear universe , then there would be no value of Pi. either.

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  • ANDY
    Lv 5
    2 months ago

    Let's look at it this way. If 2 + 3 is 5,   5 x 2 is 10,   2 ÷ 1 is 2.  Now, had the universe been "slightly different" as you say, would 2 + 3 be 9  etc...etc.? I doubt it. Measurements would be the same on another planet of a slightly different universe. However, numbers could have different values, but the calculations would give a same result. Pi could be different in its value as a number, but at the same time you'd get the same "results" that would coincide as its being 3.142.... but written with other numbers. In brief, it's always "circumference divided by diameter".

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  • 2 months ago

    No. Pi is the circumference of a circle divided by the diameter in euclidean geometry. Pi is also the sum of many different infinite series. It could not be any other number. Pi is defined by mathematics, not by nature or experiments.

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  • 2 months ago

    Some people will try to tell you that pi is a man-made number, but not even a god could've made a universe with pi having a different value.

    Also, no god could make a universe with a different series of prime numbers, such as: 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 13, 15, etc. 

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  • 2 months ago

    only when

    a = sqrt [(c-b)*(c+b)]

    is not true.

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    • neb
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      Different states of motion and/or different positions in a gravitational field have different constant time slices and thus different geometric space measurements. That’s why the volume of a black hole is meaningless. Different observers within the BH will have radically different measures of volume

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