Max
Lv 5
Max asked in Arts & HumanitiesPhilosophy · 1 month ago

Why does the universe have so many galaxies?

Apparently their are 100 billion- 2 trillion galaxies in the universe. I’m sure the total number is even higher. Do you think that’s enough? The Heat Death Paradox has me thinking the universe is finite; but the length and width is so absurdly large, that to our minds; it might as well be infinite. Now I know that nature doesn’t have to do anything we want; but I don’t understand why such an enormous number of HUGE structures formed. Philosophically speaking;  if humanity had a purpose; why was it put in a universe with numbers our minds can not comprehend?

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  • Jimbo
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    I dont think we need to, or are able to understand the purpose. But something interesting to consider, is that at the edge of the observable universe, objects are moving away from us at faster than the speed of light. This means no matter whether we have the telescopes to see that far, we will never be able to see them, ever.

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  • Humanity doesn't have a "purpose" in the sense you describe, but let's say it does.  What does the physical space humanity occupies have to do with it?  Your body has millions of cells in it, most of which you could do without if it were to disappear instantly.  However, there are a few cells that, if removed instantly, would kill you or alter your body permanently.  If somehow humanity was like one of THOSE cells ("a purpose"), the physical traits aren't even relevant.  By the way, same argument over our short time in this universe compared to the vast expanse of time we aren't around for.

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  • 1 month ago

    I think galaxies mimic universes that are just as numerous, but we can't see them, just as planetary systems mimic galaxies. Physicist said that the egress point of the universe back to the beginning could have had more than just one universe coming out of the void.

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  • j153e
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Another point of interest re the continuously expanding Universe, which is presently believed by science to be destined to continue expanding until its "heat death" trillions of years hence, is about 1/2001th of the original matter-antimatter of the creation or originary event.  Most of the mass of matter and antimatter apparently collided and became energy again, and the reason for the imbalance of 1,001 matter particles for every 1,000 antimatter particles is likewise unknown.  It is also unknown how so much mass was all together in a region smaller than a proton.

    Another interesting area is dark energy and dark matter; they are not anti-matter, as far is observed, yet according to NASA and other sources, the total visible mass of the Universe is about 1/20th of the whole (dark matter = 25%, dark energy = 70%).

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    <  if humanity had a purpose >

    We happened, there was no 'purpose'.

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  • Liz
    Lv 4
    1 month ago

    Vastness of Universe. The galaxy within which Earth is located, commonly called the Milky Way, is believed to measure some 100,000 light-years across and to contain over 100,000,000,000 stars like our sun. The closest star to Earth, one of the Alpha Centauri group, is over 40,000,000,000,000 km (25,000,000,000,000 mi) away. Yet this immensity seems relatively small in view of the estimate that there are 100,000,000,000 galaxies throughout universal space. About 10,000,000,000 of these are within the range of modern telescopes.

    The vastness of the stellar creation adds infinite force and meaning to the Creator’s statement at Isaiah 40:26: “Raise your eyes high up and see. Who has created these things? It is the One who is bringing forth the army of them even by number, all of whom he calls even by name. Due to the abundance of dynamic energy, he also being vigorous in power, not one of them is missing.”

    The reverent psalmist was led to say: “When I see your heavens, the works of your fingers, the moon and the stars that you have prepared, what is mortal man that you keep him in mind, and the son of earthling man that you take care of him?”—Ps 8:3, 4.

    Something to think about.

    Source(s): jw.org
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  • ?
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    It would seem that at least on some points Einstein wasn't entirely correct. As quantum physics developes and technology enables more detailed and accurate experiments we may come to a very different understanding of the universe which surrounds us. Currently the tools we have available to us are being developed and enhanced and this takes time. Study of dark matter suggests that the the 2 trillion galaxies are indeed not enough to explain what we observe. In this respect quantum computing should provide a significant step forward into new fields of technology which ultimately will lead us to a unified theory of the universe.

    While we're waiting we'll just have to stick with the view that nature abhors a vacuum

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  • There are games out there with multiple galaxies in them. Our own universe, on an observable scale, is quite immense. Why? Could it be any other way? Also, have you heard about dark matter galaxies? They are made up of mostly dark matter. Pretty cool, to think of how advanced civilizations might exist in such places. But, all in all, there really isn't a good answer to why energy would exist at all. Our top physicists are working on it.

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  • Sam
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    This might help grasp the concept of universe expansion.

    Think of our universe as a speck of dust accumulating on the tip of a needle of a much larger dimension of giant beings. 

    Source(s): I don't like to think about the awesomeness of the universe for too long, it gives my finite limited human brain a headache. If a brain expands too fast, it will explode, there'll be a big bang and splat, but evolved over billions of years, the skull that contains the brain slowly expands to compensate. That's the best I can come up with, to understand a concept of the universe in a container. Humans always want to build walls to contain what they do understand and keep out what they don't understand. We don't understand a universe without walls. Maybe if we tear down all the walls, we might find the universe easier to understand. Have fun ;)
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  • 1 month ago

    Perhaps it's not about us. Any planted stalk of corn in a field might ask the same thing.

    • Sam
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      lol, have you been talking with stalks of corn much?   ;) 

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