Who is responsible for the repairs?

I have a 2015 Hyundai Sonata Sport 2.0T has 83,423 miles Purchase in August 2018 from a local Ford dealer. Fast forward to Monday of last week. Started hearing a whining noise that got louder and more consistent. Seemed like I was losing power with the car. Had it towed to Hyundai because I thoughtI had a warranty. Well the powertrain warranty is non transferable. So they looked at the car. The Intake Air boot that goes from the air filter box to the turbo had come off. Well that boot is a recalled part. They tell me now I need a new turbo, that the turbo is coming apart internally. They're quoting me almost $3,000 to fix this. I do not have $3,000. I would think somebody should be responsible for this repair because the recall part failed. the mechanic tells me that from that boot coming off did not cause that turbo to be damaged. crazy but I did not have any problems with my car until that recall part came off. Could you tell me who may be responsible.

Update:

I guess what I'm asking or trying to figure out is since this part that caused the damage was recalled part would that not be the dealers responsibility? Either Hyundai or the person I bought it from the dealer I bought it from? Had the recall work been done already I would not be in this situation. 

28 Answers

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  • ?
    Lv 7
    1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    The rubber boot on the air intake DID NOT cause damage to the turbocharger.

    It kind of sux that the 10 year/100k mile powertrain warranty is only for the original owner, but... If they won't honor the warranty, then it's YOUR car and YOUR problem!

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  • zipper
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    Yes you are> That is what happens when you buy a non-American car from an American Dealer, A bad costly lean-son, I know but live and learn!

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    You are.

    < I have a 2015 Hyundai Sonata Sport 2.0T has 83,423 miles >

    You purchased a used car with a reasonable number of miles over a year ago.  No one is going to pick up the repair costs unless it was sold with a used car warranty.

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  • 1 month ago

    You are responsible. I checked Consumer Reports, which lists all of the NHTSA recalls. The 2015 Sonata shows no recall for an intake boot. Other years had problems but not 2015. And it is unlikely that a leaking boot would cause the turbo to fail. It would be upon you to prove that the recall item was the cause of the failure.

    If you were the original owner, you wouldn't have to prove anything and Hyundai would repair/replace the turbo. It is covered under the 10yr/100k warranty, but only for the original owner.

    You can try fighting with the national company, but I don't think you will get anywhere. My 2012 Accent had a factory paint defect, improperly applied primer that wouldn't hold paint - the dealer cited the specific problem and told me that this year had paint problems. But the first flaking away didn't show until one month after the 3 year bumper to bumper expired, and the national company would not stand behind their product. I like the Sonata, drove an electric hybrid rental on vacation, but I will never buy another Hyundai. They had one chance to show me how they stand behind their product and they failed.

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    • Coquihalla
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      curtisports2-The 2012 paint defect was not the fault of the Hyundai company but of the paint manufacturer of the PRIMER.  affecting Chevs, Fords, Toyotas, Dodge, Mitsubishi, Honda, Hyundai & more(the grey primer was garbage) that were silver or white.The other colors took red primer.No problems.FYI

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  • hart
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    it is a lubrication problem

  • 1 month ago

    Tell the service manager you want to speak with the Ford District Representative.

    Source(s): Mitsubishi Master Tech
    • Edna
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      It's not Ford's responsibility. Ford Motor Company didn't manufacture the used Hyundai; that he bought from a Ford dealership when the car was already 5 years old. If anyone is responsible for repairs due to a recall, it would be Hyundai - and NOT Ford.

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  • 1 month ago

    I keep seeing people on this site saying how wonderful Korean cars are these days, and it makes me laugh.

    Your FIRST mistake was buying a Hyundai from a FORD dealer. (Why did the former owner change brands?)

    NEXT, why did they trade in a car that's still relatively new? All I can say is good luck.

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  • 1 month ago

    The timing is a coincidence . The turbo was actually already failing, but didn't get bad enough for you to notice. The dealer is correct.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    You are 100% responsible it's your car.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    It’s a five-year-old piece of **** to begin with. It’s out of warranty, so there’s no motivation for the dealer to fix it.

    You do have an option to simply ignore the dealer and have someone else repair the problem. Maybe you could repair the problem.

    Dealer pricing for their service is astronomical.

    Start plastering craigslist and Facebook and see if you can come up with someone who can help. There are mechanics everywhere. They don’t like the dealer pricing anymore than you do.

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    • Nuff Sed
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      @Edna: it might be a dealership's responsibility to make (or pay for) certain types of repairs on a used car, depending upon your state's lemon laws. E.g., MA law for whatever it needs to pass "inspection".

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